OGL DnD Shorts final video

Haplo781

Legend
Not at all, if his firing is incredibly public and harmful to his career, in the sense that it destroys it. Of course, the real prizes would be Hasbro CEO Chris Cocks and WotC president Cynthia Williams. Not just a firing like "okay, our visions didn't match and we need to amicably part ways" but scorched earth. If the thing the next guy hears is "yeah, the last time we tried to mess with D&D, the CEO, WotC president and person who came up with the plan all lost their jobs and are now working as sales assistants because no company will put them anywhere near an executive position" then that may be enough to make that executive think twice.
Yes maybe you misread a word in my post.
 

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Xyxox

Hero
Explain how you arrived at this conclusion.
Forums are poor places for extended explanations. Suffice it to say, there is far much more at work here than Chris Cao. This is easily evidenced by the fact that he was unaware of the D&D Beyond acquisition until it actually happened.

Chris Cao is a small minor piece on the chess board of actors that brought things to this point.
 

Haplo781

Legend
Forums are poor places for extended explanations. Suffice it to say, there is far much more at work here than Chris Cao. This is easily evidenced by the fact that he was unaware of the D&D Beyond acquisition until it actually happened.

Chris Cao is a small minor piece on the chess board of actors that brought things to this point.
I think you just can't.
 


doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
Why do people take Wizards at their word.

They seem to lack confidence in their ability to win in a fair contest.

Alternately, don’t use the fancy features of VTTs.

Or use discord, video or voice chat, and theater of the mind. This is a perfectly viable means to play.

It’s the bells and whistles that they’re trying to monetize. Bells and whistles are extraneous to play, not necessary to play.
He more this develops the more I find it funny that they chose this route rather than building a platform where the main page is D&D but every publisher that signs on has thier own “nexus”, it’s own tools and marketplace, using shared tools that can be modified to suit different games but have an easy default setup for publishers that aren’t tech savvy.

Wotc could have been getting (let’s say) 2% of most of the digital transactions in the TTRPG space within a few years of launch, if they had maintained a decent reputation.

No need to change the OGL, just have rules for using the platform. 🤷‍♂️
As long as those rules aren’t garbage, and the percentage is small enough, most publishers would sign on.

And now that they might possibly see how bad an idea this all was, it’s too late to go the other way. Just wild.
 



darjr

I crit!
Yes, it does. We have been in talks to full turn it on to monitor the employees at my work. We have also set it for various client so they can track their workers.
Whats more it has a statistical analysis mode to try and discover things like disgruntled employees and/or who is spreading rumors.

It's not called that.
 

Steel_Wind

Legend
No kidding. How many good game franchises have been wrecked by seeking to become the next WOW?

One fact that is forgotten is a not all D&D players are MMORPG players. In fact, most of the people I have played with no not like MMO. Otherwise, would the two D&D MMOs be bigger then they are?
It is easy to get carried away here. There have been two significant contractions in terms of the player base -- mostly in people by-passing even entering the game (as opposed to leaving it), but it's happened twice.

The first was M:TG. That new game sucked out the wallets of players and many kids who might have played AD&D instead played M:TG and then moved on to something else. That disruption in player acquisition was fatal to a brand that was already wounded. AD&D died -- and the makers of M:TG ended up buying it.

The second occurred vaguely in 2006 through 2010, at WoW's height. There were a LOT of gaming groups that died or were dissolved at that time as players moved to WoW. There were DOZENS of those threads here on ENWorld at the time, some with MANY posts. Many others, who might have become D&D players? They simply did not. They were too busy playing WoW. What effect this had on 4th Ed? We'll never really know, but it certainly inspired aspects of its design. And in the end, 4e didn't turn out well for anybody.

Indeed, WoW was large enough at its height that it sucked the very life out of the rest of the computer games business (except for WoW itself). Retailing of all computer games came to an end in 2008 in virtually every retail point of sale in North America and most of Western Europe. It took another ~18 months and Steam to save that industry. (See "the Domedness of PC Gaming" threads from that era). Many computer game developers went under because of it and it changed the entire computer game publishing industry, from top to bottom. Those changes persist to this very day.

You are projecting your own social circle and personal experiences here in a way that is unwarranted and inaccurate.

tl;dr: WoW was disruptive AF.
 


Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
I think you just can't.

Mod Note:
I think you are getting reported for various reasons far too frequently. You are making yourself into a good example of a disruptive poster.

It is past time for you to reel in your tendencies to be snarky, and make discussion about the speakers, instead of keeping to what you are saying. Stop making it personal, and stop with the insulting potshots.
 

ECMO3

Hero
Why are people treating this video as fact?

You can only make decisions based on the a available information and we do know for a fact WOTC has lied multiple times and there is strong indications that even the newest apology obfuscates the real reasons for the move to deauthorize.

So when you have someone caught in a bald-face lie that makes further efforts and an apology that seems to skirt the real reason, then you just don't trust that company and tend to trust alternative explanations.

I think the tone in the new OGL 1.2 "playtest" is a lot better than the original statement from a week ago, but even here he talks about things like NFTs and hate as being the reason when all indications are the new license is to better WOTC's bottom line.

If WOTC was being completely 100% truthful they would come out and say "We need to deauthorize OGL 1.0a to improve our revenue and the profitability of the brand so our shareholders can make more money"

They didn't say that though, even in the newest apology.
 


raniE

Adventurer
It is easy to get carried away here. There have been two significant contractions in terms of the player base -- mostly in people by-passing even entering the game (as opposed to leaving it), but it's happened twice.

The first was M:TG. That new game sucked out the wallets of players and many kids who might have played AD&D instead played M:TG and then moved on to something else. That disruption in player acquisition was fatal to a brand that was already wounded. AD&D died -- and the makers of M:TG ended up buying it.

I think that contraction had already happened at that point. AD&D 2e did not sell as well as AD&D 1e or Basic D&D had. Magic came out in 1993, by that point AD&D 2e was already way behind 1e and Basic in sales.
 

Enrahim2

Adventurer
I think that contraction had already happened at that point. AD&D 2e did not sell as well as AD&D 1e or Basic D&D had. Magic came out in 1993, by that point AD&D 2e was already way behind 1e and Basic in sales.
There was multiple factors i play. While magic might have gotten a lot of the competative fantasy audience, White Wolf very agressively targeted the role players. And AD&D1 was still in use by their loyal fan base. It is likely hard to measure these factors agai st each other.
 

demoss

Explorer
D&D Shorts has been wrong several times. So I don't put stock in what he puts out.
I know of one instance of him having been wrong. That error was publicly acknowledged by him, and apologized for.

Please substantiate your claim of being wrong several times, or correct your statement.

Yes, he is not a reporter, and that shows - but that is a different kettle of fish.
 

demoss

Explorer
I think that contraction had already happened at that point. AD&D 2e did not sell as well as AD&D 1e or Basic D&D had. Magic came out in 1993, by that point AD&D 2e was already way behind 1e and Basic in sales.
During 2e era there was also significant leakage into other RPGs.

It was the age of MANY games with principal feature of "this game has a unified rule system instead of a bazillion different ones", which was a very appealing prospect after having wrestled with 2e. None of them became as huge, but the big ones are still alive and kicking.

(Big in comparison to their competition, not in comparison to D&D.)
 

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