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Dune: Adventures in the Imperium is Now Available!

The most anticipated tabletop RPG of 2021... and 2020! ... is anticipated no more! You can now pick up the PDF of Dune: Adventures in the Imperium! It's 336 pages, powered by Modiphius' 2d20 System, and also includes a starter adventure.

dune.jpeg


You can also pre-order the hardcover, or various accessories.

 

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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey

Paragon Lost

Terminally Lost
Supporter
I own a lot of Modiphius' basic rulebooks (Conan, John Carter, Star Trek Adventures, and now Dune). Dune seems to be the most and best organized of these. They really managed to address the issues of rules organization, and also - as far as I can tell - indexing. I don't now if this is an effect of the rules being the most streamlined yet available, or if it's really evidence of a learning process on Modiphius' side. The book also includes a rules summary at the end that an experienced 2d20 gamemaster could use to start running the game right away. I am very much impressed by the PDF release so far.
That's great to hear. I planned on buying the game, I just was waiting until the physical books also were released. :) thanks for letting us know this.
 

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Yaztromo

Explorer
"powered by Modiphius' 2d20 System,"

For the ignorant, like myself, what does this system (at least or best) compare to?
Modiphius adapted the 2d20 system to different settings in slightly different ways, but the basics are the same.

Your character has six characteristics (for example, Cunning, Might, Passion, Empathy...) and for each test you have to pick the two of them that make more sense in that context (for some tasks, like attacking in a melee or ranged attacks, etc. you may have already that indications by the book, but for other tasks you can make up our mind on which two are the most relevant and if they make sense it will be easy to agree that with the GM. Then you roll 2d20 and you have to roll under your characteristics. If your dice was under the lower characteristic you get one success, if the roll was under the sum of your characteristics you get another success, etc. then you add the successes of both dices (and of the potential additional dices that you may be able to roll) and, depending on the difficulty of the task, you need to check if you had enough successes to pass or not.
In general the basis of this ruleset is quite a nice system, very flexible and open to creativity.

The problems (in other 2d20 settings by Modiphius) are that sometimes the rulebook is very thick and it is not easy finding what you want when you want, and sometimes character generation has some gaps in describing some option (maybe there are too many, or too fancy, options and some detail is not described). On top of this, the full combat rules are a bit too crunchy for somebody (they involve also momentum and threat and other kind of game mechanics), making fighting a bit too long and mechanical (as crunchy rulesets usually do).

Maybe for managing these issues, Modiphius progressively modified and (in general) simplified the generic 2d20 ruleset in time, when applying it to new settings.
Hopefully on this occasion they will find the perfect balance and the most suitable adaptations to this specific setting, that is very interesting and full of roleplaying possibilities.
 
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Modiphius adapted the 2d20 system to different settings in slightly different ways, but the basics are the same.

Your character has six characteristics (Cunning, Might, Passion, Empathy...) and for each test you have to pick the two of them that make more sense in that context (for some tasks, like attacking in a melee or ranged attacks, etc. you may have already that indications by the book, but for other tasks you can make up our mind on which two are the most relevant and if they make sense it will be easy to agree that with the GM. Then you roll 2d20 and you have to roll under your characteristics. If your dice was under the lower characteristic you get one success, if the roll was under the sum of your characteristics you get another success, etc. then you add the successes of both dices (and of the potential additional dices that you may be able to roll) and, depending on the difficulty of the task, you need to check if you had enough successes to pass or not.
Cunning attribute is only found in the John Carter of Mars 2d20, and is a very different 2d20 from most others in that there are no skills in use by characters in John Carter of Mars RPG.
 
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Paragon Lost

Terminally Lost
Supporter
Cunning attribute is only found in the John Carter of Mars 2d20, and is a very different 2d30 from most others in that there are no skills in use by characters in John Carter of Mars RPG.
I was very confused when I read their post, thanks for replying to what they posted and clearing that up. What they posted wasn't matching up to my Conan material. I did snag the John Carter PDF's on a Bundle of Holding some time ago but hadn't read through them yet. Too many books and not enough free time.
 

I was very confused when I read their post, thanks for replying to what they posted and clearing that up. What they posted wasn't matching up to my Conan material. I did snag the John Carter PDF's on a Bundle of Holding some time ago but hadn't read through them yet. Too many books and not enough free time.
Thanks. I did mistype one of the 2d20 into a thirty. Ha ha ha!

By the way, the Japense langauge has a beautiful word for this problem of having too many books with many unread.

"Tsundoku".
 

Paragon Lost

Terminally Lost
Supporter
Thanks. I did mistype one of the 2d20 into a thirty. Ha ha ha!

By the way, the Japense langauge has a beautiful word for this problem of having too many books with many unread.

"Tsundoku".
Yep, I wasn't going to call you out on a obvious typo when we all knew what you meant. :) Also, that word, soo much awesome. Have to mention it to my wife, knowing her she probably already had heard the term.
 

Modiphius adapted the 2d20 system to different settings in slightly different ways, but the basics are the same.

Your character has six characteristics (Cunning, Might, Passion, Empathy...) and for each test you have to pick the two of them that make more sense in that context (for some tasks, like attacking in a melee or ranged attacks, etc. you may have already that indications by the book, but for other tasks you can make up our mind on which two are the most relevant and if they make sense it will be easy to agree that with the GM. Then you roll 2d20 and you have to roll under your characteristics. If your dice was under the lower characteristic you get one success, if the roll was under the sum of your characteristics you get another success, etc. then you add the successes of both dices (and of the potential additional dices that you may be able to roll) and, depending on the difficulty of the task, you need to check if you had enough successes to pass or not.
In general the basis of this ruleset is quite a nice system, very flexible and open to creativity.

The problems (in other 2d20 settings by Modiphius) are that sometimes the rulebook is very thick and it is not easy finding what you want when you want, and sometimes character generation has some gaps in describing some option (maybe there are too many, or too fancy, options and some detail is not described). On top of this, the full combat rules are a bit too crunchy for somebody (they involve also momentum and threat and other kind of game mechanics), making fighting a bit too long and mechanical (as crunchy rulesets usually do).

Maybe for managing these issues, Modiphius progressively modified and (in general) simplified the generic 2d20 ruleset in time, when applying it to new settings.
Hopefully on this occasion they will find the perfect balance and the most suitable adaptations to this specific setting, that is very interesting and full of roleplaying possibilities.
Thanks for the stepped breakdown!
 

mykesfree

Explorer
I own a lot of Modiphius' basic rulebooks (Conan, John Carter, Star Trek Adventures, and now Dune). Dune seems to be the most and best organized of these. They really managed to address the issues of rules organization, and also - as far as I can tell - indexing. I don't now if this is an effect of the rules being the most streamlined yet available, or if it's really evidence of a learning process on Modiphius' side. The book also includes a rules summary at the end that an experienced 2d20 gamemaster could use to start running the game right away. I am very much impressed by the PDF release so far.
100% the Index is awesome and well laid out compared to the other 2d20 games.
 

Modiphius adapted the 2d20 system to different settings in slightly different ways, but the basics are the same.

Your character has six characteristics (for example, Cunning, Might, Passion, Empathy...)
Wrong. You're describing only one of the flavors. (JCOM, IIRC)
Dune has 5 skills and 5 beliefs, one from each column.
STA has 6 atts and 6 "disciplines", again, one from each column.
Conan has more than a dozen skills, and 6 attributes. One from each.
 

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