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Dune: Adventures in the Imperium is Now Available!

The most anticipated tabletop RPG of 2021... and 2020! ... is anticipated no more! You can now pick up the PDF of Dune: Adventures in the Imperium! It's 336 pages, powered by Modiphius' 2d20 System, and also includes a starter adventure.

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You can also pre-order the hardcover, or various accessories.

 

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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey



meltdownpass

Explorer
Dune is probably my favorite science fiction setting. The artwork here looks great, but I am not sure I am interested in Modiphius system. Will have to learn more about it.
 

Ulfgeir

Hero
"powered by Modiphius' 2d20 System,"

For the ignorant, like myself, what does this system (at least or best) compare to?
If it is like the system they use in Star Trek, John Carter, and so on, it is something like this (Going a bit from memory here, but looking at the John Carter system).

Base: Roll 2d20. It is roll low. Each die that is below the sum of two attributes is a success (I believe it is attribute + skill in Star Trek). Each die that is equal to or lower than the weakest of the attributes get an extra success. The difficulty tells how many successes you need. You can gain up to 3 extra dice to roll.

Normally you would need a single success, but you can need up to 5 for almost impossible things..
 
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imagineGod

Legend
Those of us who were not there for The Last Unicorn edition can finally get an affordable Dune role playing game, thanks to Modiphius Entertainment.

And here is a nice review of it too, especially for those still sitting on the fence.

 

If it is like the system they use in Star Trek, John Carter, and so on, it is something like this (Going a bit from memory here, but looking at the John Carter system).

Base: Roll 2d20. It is roll low. Each die that is below the sum of two attributes is a success (I believe it is attribute + skill in Star Trek). Each die that is equal to or lower than the weakest of the attributes get an extra success. The difficulty tells how many successes you need. You can gain up to 3 extra dice to roll.

Normally you would need a single success, but you can need up to 5 for almsot impossible things..
Thanks for that. I will digest it. I love Dune and read the novel twice.
 

Ulfgeir

Hero
Thanks for that. I will digest it. I love Dune and read the novel twice.
You also have a thing called momentum, which you can get by succeeding very well, and that can be used to power some abilites as far as I recall.

Note though, that you might need to roll if you are really good maybe 14 or below, and only get the extra successes if you roll say 4 or 5 or below. The systems are similar but different in their different games, and those changes will change a lot on how deadly it is.
 

You also have a thing called momentum, which you can get by succeeding very well, and that can be used to power some abilites as far as I recall.

Note though, that you might need to roll if you nare really good maybe 14 or below, and only get the extra successes if you roll say 4 or 5 or below. The systems are similar but different in their different games, and those changes will change a lot on how deadly it is.
Cool. Some innovative work there and re-imagining going on. I'd have to play a demo-game to really get the feel. I can appreciate systems that can inflate/expand and are more granular and less cut-n-dried linear. Each has its own strength and purpose. In my board game design, Magus (Dragon Magazine #147 insert), I forwarded a simple concept of modifying a 2d6 roll for movement purposes. Like I noted, I like granular mechanics as long as they don't go too far down rabbit holes.
 

lyle.spade

Adventurer
Thanks for that. I will digest it. I love Dune and read the novel twice.

This is a good overview of how the system works. I play their versions of Star Trek and Conan, and was a play tester for Dune and Achtung! Cthulhu - I love 2d20; it's a great, flexible system.

 



Grendel_Khan

Adventurer
This is a good overview of how the system works. I play their versions of Star Trek and Conan, and was a play tester for Dune and Achtung! Cthulhu - I love 2d20; it's a great, flexible system.

I'm curious about how the intrigue rules work. Were you able to use those rules during playtesting?
 

Paragon Lost

Terminally Lost
Cool. Some innovative work there and re-imagining going on. I'd have to play a demo-game to really get the feel. I can appreciate systems that can inflate/expand and are more granular and less cut-n-dried linear. Each has its own strength and purpose. In my board game design, Magus (Dragon Magazine #147 insert), I forwarded a simple concept of modifying a 2d6 roll for movement purposes. Like I noted, I like granular mechanics as long as they don't go too far down rabbit holes.
Their books are really nice, table books really. The problem lies with layout, that leaves a lot to be desired. They need better indexes, rules in the same place where it makes sense so you don't have look all over the place etc. The game mechanics as others have posted here are pretty straightforward and work. I really like them, they flow and work well.
 


Thanks for that. I will digest it. I love Dune and read the novel twice.
Give it a shot. I used to hate the idea of 2D20, and my initial attempt to read Star Trek made me kind of angry.
Then I jumped in and played it, and I'm a fan now. It's quite simple, works well, and is fun and narrative focused. The Acthung Cthulhu implementation/quick start is great.
Have Dune hardcover on preorder.
 

Their books are really nice, table books really. The problem lies with layout, that leaves a lot to be desired. They need better indexes, rules in the same place where it makes sense so you don't have look all over the place etc. The game mechanics as others have posted here are pretty straightforward and work. I really like them, they flow and work well.

I own a lot of Modiphius' basic rulebooks (Conan, John Carter, Star Trek Adventures, and now Dune). Dune seems to be the most and best organized of these. They really managed to address the issues of rules organization, and also - as far as I can tell - indexing. I don't now if this is an effect of the rules being the most streamlined yet available, or if it's really evidence of a learning process on Modiphius' side. The book also includes a rules summary at the end that an experienced 2d20 gamemaster could use to start running the game right away. I am very much impressed by the PDF release so far.
 

I own a lot of Modiphius' basic rulebooks (Conan, John Carter, Star Trek Adventures, and now Dune). Dune seems to be the most and best organized of these. They really managed to address the issues of rules organization, and also - as far as I can tell - indexing. I don't now if this is an effect of the rules being the most streamlined yet available, or if it's really evidence of a learning process on Modiphius' side. The book also includes a rules summary at the end that an experienced 2d20 gamemaster could use to start running the game right away. I am very much impressed by the PDF release so far.
Really good to know, as although I'm locked anyway after preordering around xmas, the quickstart definitely confused me a bit around combat, things like assets, etc...wasn't sure how to run that, as those things are definitely at a different level of abstraction than I'm used to. Not sure how to communicate that to players and get them into it, as well.
 

imagineGod

Legend
"powered by Modiphius' 2d20 System,"

For the ignorant, like myself, what does this system (at least or best) compare to?00

Really good to know, as although I'm locked anyway after preordering around xmas, the quickstart definitely confused me a bit around combat, things like assets, etc...wasn't sure how to run that, as those things are definitely at a different level of abstraction than I'm used to. Not sure how to communicate that to players and get them into it, as well.
If you played those Creative Assembly Total War computer games, then Dune plays at that strategic level rather than on the ground tactical.

But even closeup personal interactions in the Dune RPG still play strategic, so instead of draining an enemy out of hit points, you take away assets and maneuver for a desired outcome. This makes combat fast.

Same with social encounters. It is about end goal positions rather than a play-by-play roll of dice for each speech in a debate.
 

lyle.spade

Adventurer
I'm curious about how the intrigue rules work. Were you able to use those rules during playtesting?
They were not a part of the playtest, unfortunately. However, they're based on the same core mechanic, and so I can't imagine that they'd be difficult to understand and implement. The playtest left out that and mass combat.
 

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