D&D Movie/TV Here's The D&D Movie Trailer!

"Who needs heroes when you have thieves?" The movie arrives March 3rd, 2023. Here's the trailer! When they said it was inspired by Guardians of the Galaxy, they weren't kidding! We have dragons, owlbears, mimics, gelatinous cubes, quips, and more!



There was also a clip shown at San Diego Comic Con where the party cast speak with dead, and got to ask five questions. Also, apparently, the D&D cartoon characters from the 80s have a cameo!
 

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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey

payn

Legend
I feel this is going to be the blockbuster of 2023, because this movie has been produced not only to promote the D&D brand, but also to offer the crown is asking, heroes vs monsters, fun and spectacule. It is the movie for the audence who loves fantasy & sci-fi franchise, and "ready to taste a new recipe served in the restaurant". It may work better than even Maverick.
I like the enthusiasm, but matching or topping Maverick is the tallest of orders. I'm still amazed at how well it has done.
 

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The Top Gun sequel - it's Top Gun: Maverick around here at least, don't know if it has a different name internationally.

(True story though - I thought for a second I'd missed a new film release based on the classic James Garner television series before I remembered the Top Gun movie).
It's also the 9th highest grossing US film of all time, already, while still in theaters. There's a reasonable chance it hits two billion. It's already at 1.6 worldwide
 

Mannahnin

Scion of Murgen (He/Him)
It's funny - I always ran things that way when I ran BECMI/BX games back in the day. When 3e came out I ran a campaign for a new group of players who I'd never played with before and who pretty much came from AD&D after a lapse in playing. I got called out by one of the players for an NPC using a spell that wasn't in the game - it was in the game, just the description didn't match the text in the book (he was a dark wizard type whose magic missiles came in the form of black light skulls that bit into character when they hit instead of just being force bolts). They said they thought it was unfair for NPCs to have abilities that PCs didn't have (to which my response was "well, you can make your spells look how you want too" and they told me that wasn't the point).

Since then I've always made it clear that the flavor text in the book is just flavor - it's the rules text that matters. If you want your magic missiles to be purple flowers and when they hit there's a hint of lilac scent in the air I'm not going to say no so long as you aren't trying to get some kind of extra game effect out of it (and even then we can talk). But it didn't even occur to me before then to think I had to. Just another way that everyone's experiences with the game were different.
It's not even a new idea, though I definitely still underuse it. Dragon issue 200 (1993) had a prominent article (The Color of Magic) about making (mostly) cosmetic changes to spells to make them more interesting and mysterious.

The existing D&D spells from the D&D Cyclopedia cover most magical effects already. New spells are often just minor variations of old ones. Bardolph’s electromagnetic barrier sounds novel, but if it measures 20' x 60', prevents the passage of creatures with fewer than four hit dice, and does 1-6 points of damage to all others, then it's not very different from a wall of fire or wall of ice. At least, it's not very different in terms of game mechanics. In terms of game atmosphere (how the players perceive it), it could be very different indeed!

This is the key to creating hundreds of new spells to suit any kind of spell-caster: make cosmetic changes to existing spells. Describe spells differently. Magic missile need not be a shimmering arrow. It could be a telekinetic fist, a jet of flame, or a steel pin stuck into a voodoo doll. The game mechanics remain the same. All that changes is how these effects are brought about. Hence, a magic missile variant will still do 2-7 points of damage, with a rangeof 150' and a duration of one round. A shield spell still grants a saving throw. As for the rest, use your imagination. Maybe Maximus the Black casts magic missile by momentarily enchanting his dagger, then making a pass at a distant enemy with it. A cut, doing 2-7 points of damage, opens up on Maximus' enemy, mirroring the swipe Maximus made with his dagger.

When you redefine how spells work, you may need to make some additional, minor changes for the sake of consistency. Maximus the Black, for instance, will always need a dagger or some other sharp implement with which to cast his version of magic missile. Such changes require careful thought from the DM and ought not to affect the overall power of the spell too greatly.

The benefit of this method is that there is no danger of upsetting the game balance. All the spell effects have been extensively playtested already. Redefining the causes just adds color, individuality, and panache.

Spells can also be styled so that they are in keeping with the overall conception of the character. As an example, take Illfrith the Ice Queen, a 5th-level magic-user NPC who lives in the DM's Northern Wastes campaign. Ordinarily, she would not be able to use any ice magic until she reached 7th level (wall of ice). Yet she can cast fireball at 5th level. By describing her spells differently, however, she becomes a real Mistress of Ice Magic.

Here are Illfrith's spells, with descriptive notes. Unless stated otherwise, all the effects remain the same as the original spell (damage, range, duration, saving throws, etc.).

First level
Magic missile. Illfrith conjures an icicle out of thin air, then hurls it.

Shield. Her skin becomes the bluish-white color of a glacier. Intense heat, as from a fire-based spell or large, open bonfire or furnace within 10 negates this spell.

Second level
Knock. Illfrith freezes any lock or bar on the affected portal, causing it to become brittle and shatter with the first use of force.

Web. Instead of sticky strands, a layer of ice forms over the area affected, immobilizing all within. The ice can be physically broken or melted with fire (standard 1-6 points of damage in the latter case to any characters touched by the flames).

Third level
Fireball. Illfrith creates a zone of intense cold (Fimbul-winter) in an area corresponding to a fireball’s standard area of effect. The duration is one round.

If you work backward from the effects to the cause, you will find that standard D&D spells can be transformed almost infinitely. So long as the power of a spell is not increased, anything goes. You can even change the name if it suits you. The D&D game is about imagination. Use it, and bring back mystical magic.
 



Jer

Legend
Supporter
It's not even a new idea, though I definitely still underuse it. Dragon issue 200 (1993) had a prominent article (The Color of Magic) about making (mostly) cosmetic changes to spells to make them more interesting and mysterious.
You know what - I read that article. As I'm reading the excerpt I'm realizing I remember that exact example with the ice wizard.

Except I must have gotten the idea from somewhere else because by '93 I'd been doing that with spells before that. But that's the type of approach I still use in my games.
 

Mannahnin

Scion of Murgen (He/Him)
You know what - I read that article. As I'm reading the excerpt I'm realizing I remember that exact example with the ice wizard.

Except I must have gotten the idea from somewhere else because by '93 I'd been doing that with spells before that. But that's the type of approach I still use in my games.
Yeah, I'm sure there are older articles or editorials which talked about the idea earlier; maybe in less detail.
 



This time I am going to say it seriously, not kidding.

Do you think maybe in the next year we could see a collab D&D: Honor among thiefs and Fortnite to promote the movie? Let's rembember thanks Fortnite some old and forgotten IPs can enjoy a second opportunity, and famous people has become skins in Fortnite.

Other idea in my head is if the "buble" of the superheroes burts, then the replacement may be by the medieval fantasy/sword & sorcery. I guess the key is not the genre but the title itself. For example "Hercules" is a character of domain public, and when somebody says a movie about Hercules, now lot of people imagine the character played by Kevin Sorbo, the show what was the point of origin of Xena the warrior princess. If somebody mention the movie of "Conan the barbarian" we think about Arnold Swcharzenaegger and we forgotten totally the movie with Jason Momoa (and Rose McGowan as a evil sorcerer). Everybody can produce a movie about Robin Hood, but we remember Eron Finn and Kevin Costner. I mean a genre itself, or a famous IP is not enough to produce a true blockbuster. The fun fact is if the producers knew the way, they would do it always for all the titles, and then the audience would get boring and would find a different thing.

Why could work D&D where Warcraft relatively failed?

And let's add the point if this is the "year 0" of D&D cinematographic universe, then Disney should worry too much because a new franchise can become the rival for Marvel and Star Wars.
 


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