D&D Movie/TV Here's The D&D Movie Trailer!

"Who needs heroes when you have thieves?" The movie arrives March 3rd, 2023. Here's the trailer! When they said it was inspired by Guardians of the Galaxy, they weren't kidding! We have dragons, owlbears, mimics, gelatinous cubes, quips, and more!



There was also a clip shown at San Diego Comic Con where the party cast speak with dead, and got to ask five questions. Also, apparently, the D&D cartoon characters from the 80s have a cameo!
 

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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey


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TwoSix

Unserious gamer
I'd say that is definitely YMMV. Class certainly means something in-universe in my games.
Of course. It's just one of those concepts that players often have implicit assumptions about and might not realize there's other perspectives that exist, so I find it useful to call out so people are aware.

In my own games, I just like to make it clear that a NPC labeled as a "druid" or a "wizard" can easily have abilities that the PCs aren't familiar with; likewise, a PC of a certain class is often the only person in the setting to have access to certain abilities.
 


Micah Sweet

Legend
Of course. It's just one of those concepts that players often have implicit assumptions about and might not realize there's other perspectives that exist, so I find it useful to call out so people are aware.

In my own games, I just like to make it clear that a NPC labeled as a "druid" or a "wizard" can easily have abilities that the PCs aren't familiar with; likewise, a PC of a certain class is often the only person in the setting to have access to certain abilities.
I prefer not to have PCs be that unique mechanically. No reason two druids have to have exclusionary powers from each other, especially if in-universe they received similar training.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
Huh. I've always found that class is too artificial a construct to be an in-universe concept for me.
The 3E DMG assumed not only that Class was very concrete in the world, but provided detailed population demographic algorithms to dwteine how.many Fighters or Druids would be in a city or kingdom, and their Level.

I think D&D has been wise to move away from that approach.
 


payn

Legend
The 3E DMG assumed not only that Class was very concrete in the world, but provided detailed population demographic algorithms to dwteine how.many Fighters or Druids would be in a city or kingdom, and their Level.

I think D&D has been wise to move away from that approach.
I dont mind this as GM prep for running adventures, but yeah its not something I'm going to call out and role play at the table.
 

Micah Sweet

Legend
The 3E DMG assumed not only that Class was very concrete in the world, but provided detailed population demographic algorithms to dwteine how.many Fighters or Druids would be in a city or kingdom, and their Level.

I think D&D has been wise to move away from that approach.
Yeah, 2e did that too. I loved it. Made it easy to determine how many adventuring types were in a given area.

Happy for you that the gaming world continues to move in your direction though.
 

Jer

Legend
Supporter
Huh. I've always found that class is too artificial a construct to be an in-universe concept for me.
Depends on the game for me. I've run games where both class and level were in-universe things, and I've run games where its all more abstract.

I lean more abstract these days - having them be in-universe things tends to inject humor into the mix IME and you can get humor in other ways that don't tie down the the way the world works quite so narrowly.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
Yeah, 2e did that too. I loved it. Made it easy to determine how many adventuring types were in a given area.

Happy for you that the gaming world continues to move in your direction though.
I don't think either direction is right or wrong, but I think leaving it more openended, so a PC Cleric maybe is the only Cleric in the world who knows, is good for tables.
 



TwoSix

Unserious gamer
I prefer not to have PCs be that unique mechanically. No reason two druids have to have exclusionary powers from each other, especially if in-universe they received similar training.
Sure. For me, it comes down to the fact that I like to throw NPCs with weird and unexpected powers at the PCs, and I don't want those NPCs to be bound by the expectations of "this is what a wizard is capable of". So I make it abundantly clear the NPCs aren't bound by PC building rules.

Running high-level 3.5/PF broke me of the idea that NPCs having to follow PC build guidelines is ever a good idea.
 

Jer

Legend
Supporter
Sure. For me, it comes down to the fact that I like to throw NPCs with weird and unexpected powers at the PCs, and I don't want those NPCs to be bound by the expectations of "this is what a wizard is capable of". So I make it abundantly clear the NPCs aren't bound by PC building rules.
It's funny - I always ran things that way when I ran BECMI/BX games back in the day. When 3e came out I ran a campaign for a new group of players who I'd never played with before and who pretty much came from AD&D after a lapse in playing. I got called out by one of the players for an NPC using a spell that wasn't in the game - it was in the game, just the description didn't match the text in the book (he was a dark wizard type whose magic missiles came in the form of black light skulls that bit into character when they hit instead of just being force bolts). They said they thought it was unfair for NPCs to have abilities that PCs didn't have (to which my response was "well, you can make your spells look how you want too" and they told me that wasn't the point).

Since then I've always made it clear that the flavor text in the book is just flavor - it's the rules text that matters. If you want your magic missiles to be purple flowers and when they hit there's a hint of lilac scent in the air I'm not going to say no so long as you aren't trying to get some kind of extra game effect out of it (and even then we can talk). But it didn't even occur to me before then to think I had to. Just another way that everyone's experiences with the game were different.
 



I feel this is going to be the blockbuster of 2023, because this movie has been produced not only to promote the D&D brand, but also to offer the crown is asking, heroes vs monsters, fun and spectacule. It is the movie for the audence who loves fantasy & sci-fi franchise, and "ready to taste a new recipe served in the restaurant". It may work better than even Maverick.
 

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