D&D (2024) How Does Greyhawk Fit In To The New Edition?

Dungeon Master’s Guide contains a sample setting—and that setting is, indeed, Greyhawk.

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According to Game Informer — “the surprising importance and inclusions of what is arguably the oldest D&D campaign setting of them all – Greyhawk.”

So how does Greyhawk fit in? According to GI, the new 2024 Dungeon Master’s Guide contains a sample setting—and that setting is, indeed, Greyhawk. Not only that, but the book will come with a double-sided poster map with the City of Greyhawk on one side and the Flannaes on the other—the eastern part of one of Oerth’s four continents.
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Even as the multiverse of D&D worlds sees increased attention, the Dungeon Master's Guide also offers a more discrete setting to get gaming groups started. After very few official releases in the last couple of decades, the world of Greyhawk takes center stage. The book fleshes out Greyhawk to illustrate how to create campaign settings of your own. Greyhawk was the original D&D game world crafted by D&D co-creator Gary Gygax, and a worthy setting to revisit on the occassion of D&D's golden anniversary. It's a world bristling with classic sword and sorcery concepts, from an intrigue-laden central city to wide tracts of uncharted wilderness. Compared to many D&D campaign settings, it's smaller and less fleshed out, and that's sort of the point; it begs for DMs to make it their own. The book offers ample info to bring Greyhawk to life but leaves much undetailed. For those eager to take the plunge, an included poster map of the Greyhawk setting sets the tone, and its reverse reveals a map of the city of the same name. "A big draw to Greyhawk is it's the origin place for such heroes as Mordenkainen, Tasha, and others," Perkins says. "There's this idea that the players in your campaign can be the next great world-hopping, spell-crafting heroes of D&D. It is the campaign where heroes are born."
- Game Informer​

 

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I remember in 3e when Kingdoms of Kalamar got semi-official status, I was excited because it was described as a richly detailed fantasy setting. And it was, but God it was so detailed that I could not absorb any of it! It was the driest read I've ever done for pleasure.

There is a thing as "too much lore" apparently!

I'm guessing that was sort of an unofficial mandate in early 3e - to give detailed, "realistic" demographic, historical, and economic data. Not only did Kalamar and the LGG do so, but even the lauded 3e FRCS did it to an extent as well.
 

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Voadam

Legend
I'm guessing that was sort of an unofficial mandate in early 3e - to give detailed, "realistic" demographic, historical, and economic data. Not only did Kalamar and the LGG do so, but even the lauded 3e FRCS did it to an extent as well.
These seem to generally match the 1e World of Greyhawk format.

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Compare to the 3e LGG entry:
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Or the 3.0 FRCS

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Parmandur

Book-Friend

Micah Sweet

Level Up & OSR Enthusiast
I'm guessing that was sort of an unofficial mandate in early 3e - to give detailed, "realistic" demographic, historical, and economic data. Not only did Kalamar and the LGG do so, but even the lauded 3e FRCS did it to an extent as well.
Yup. I really miss that priority, which came up a good bit in 2e as well.
 

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
I think this is something I struggle with when I'm doing write-ups of my campaign worlds, they end up being a catalog of places and things that are somewhat dry.

Asking everyone, what campaign setting(s) write up (book specifically) has been the most engaging, both in being enjoyable to read and inspiring you to run a game in the world? I know the grey box FR has been mentioned for the "adventure seed on every page" are there others?
But if you are not writing for an audience, this is the way to do it, I'd think. You want content that is easy to reference and quick to write. It is just cliffsnotes to help you build plots and adventures from.
 


teitan

Legend
I think this is something I struggle with when I'm doing write-ups of my campaign worlds, they end up being a catalog of places and things that are somewhat dry.

Asking everyone, what campaign setting(s) write up (book specifically) has been the most engaging, both in being enjoyable to read and inspiring you to run a game in the world? I know the grey box FR has been mentioned for the "adventure seed on every page" are there others?
The 3e FRCS is another great example, Kingdoms of Kalamar as well. Golarion is well done in original Pathfinder. Wildemount, Taldorei are also great examples. Pretty much the majority of the 5e setting books, including the SCAG. I really like the SCAG.

Usually though it is the smaller gazetteer that I think explain a setting best, concise, simple, a couple hooks.
 


Parmandur

Book-Friend
The 3e FRCS is another great example, Kingdoms of Kalamar as well. Golarion is well done in original Pathfinder. Wildemount, Taldorei are also great examples. Pretty much the majority of the 5e setting books, including the SCAG. I really like the SCAG.

Usually though it is the smaller gazetteer that I think explain a setting best, concise, simple, a couple hooks.
I would say the Explorer's Guide to Wildemount is one of the best balanced Setting books I've ever seen: concise when it should be, but chockablock full of hooks and useful information, and fun to read.
 


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