If it's the DM's job to make sure the players have fun...What is the PLAYER'S job?


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Desdichado

Adventurer
Most of the things I want my players to do are nicely covered in basic "Socializing With Friends for Dummies" type of behavior guides. There's not actually a lot that's unique to gaming that I need them to do.

Although I don't expect to tell players how to play their characters from a mechanics standpoint, unless they're new. And I really appreciate characters who are kinda "drivers" in the group, making stuff happen. I also appreciate characters who have some kind of quirk or other interesting trait that makes them fun to watch in action as a GM.

But I don't really so much require those things as I just really appreciate them.
 


Starman

First Post
To:
  • Clearly communicate which spells they have cast.
  • Know what color their character's eyes are.
  • Know where to find the Mountain Dew.
  • Know where their character is in relation to the other characters.
  • Cast magic missile at the darkness.
  • Creep out any girls in the area (in the game or not).
  • Not get in the way of any other players as they move along the path to El Diablo.
[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHdXG2gV01k]D&D Done Right[/ame]
 

Henry

Autoexreginated
If it's the DM's job to make sure the player's have fun...What is the PLAYER'S job?

What's the players' job? To make sure the DM has fun, duh! ;)

The theme of the social contract for RPGs, and the Star Wars movies as a whole, can be summed up in one acronym:

D.B.A.D.

(for those who don't get this one, Google will help)

Just like it's the DMs job to learn what his players want out of a successful game (Robin Laws helps with that immensely) it's the players' job to give the DM some stuff to work with -- don't hem and haw at choices for too long, bite on the obvious plot hooks, help a fellow player who is struggling but without taking away their freedom of choice, and compliment the DM when he does run a session that you enjoyed. Hell, if you do compliment the DM when you do enjoy a session, then when you don't the faint praise is often pretty noticeable to him or her.

Truth to tell, it's really the same rules for most all other social conduct...
 



Hejdun

First Post
The player's job is to take whatever the DM throws at them and make it entertaining and interesting for everyone, even if the DM's clearly struggling or winging it.

The player's job is to be involved. When the DM describes a scene, do something with it. When the DM pulls out an NPC, interact with it. When the DM throws out a plot hook, investigate it. The worst thing a player can do is nothing.
 

Bullgrit

Adventurer
Hejdun said:
The player's job is to take whatever the DM throws at them and make it entertaining and interesting for everyone, even if the DM's clearly struggling or winging it.

The player's job is to be involved. When the DM describes a scene, do something with it. When the DM pulls out an NPC, interact with it. When the DM throws out a plot hook, investigate it. The worst thing a player can do is nothing.
Quoted for truth! God, this would help so many games of D&D.

Bullgrit
 

The Shaman

First Post
The player's job is to take whatever the DM throws at them and make it entertaining and interesting for everyone, even if the DM's clearly struggling or winging it.

The player's job is to be involved. When the DM describes a scene, do something with it. When the DM pulls out an NPC, interact with it. When the DM throws out a plot hook, investigate it. The worst thing a player can do is nothing.
Everything you describe is the players reacting to the referee. To me, that's still just sitting around waiting for something to happen.

How about being proactive? How about taking the initiative and making the referee react instead?

To me, that's the hallmark of a good player.
 

Merkuri

First Post
At a bare minimum, I just want all of them to wear pants.

Damn, my bunch were doing great until this one.... :heh:

In our defense, we play online with no webcams, so if I don't want to wear pants I'm not gonna wear pants. :p

Everyone's job at the table is to try to maximize fun at the table. If you think of something fun to do that won't ruin other people's fun, do it. Don't wait for fun to come to you.

And if something is ruining your fun, you, as a player, have a responsibility to let someone know. If you're not having fun, don't just sit there and bear it. DMs need feedback. If the DM doesn't know you're not having fun then he doesn't realize anything needs to be changed. Just be nice about it, and give suggestions, when possible. Just saying, "I'm not having fun," isn't very helpful. Saying, "I'm not having fun because..." is better, and saying, "I'd have more fun if..." is probably best.
 

Wolf1066

First Post
Well, since - as GM - it's my job to make the players have fun, it must be their job to jump on the train, go where I send them, react according to my script and bloody-well have fun. ;)

Now, seriously:

My biggie is that the players do not behave like the game is The [insert player name] Show with all the other players and any NPCs they encounter being, at the very best, supporting actors - if not merely bit-players.

I've played with people, and had others in my games, that charge around the game universe with the attitude that they can do whatever they like and everyone else - fellow team members and NPCs alike - must just accept it... after all, (s)he's the STAR(it really needs a border of animated lights) and therefore every all the "goodies" are automatically on their side, regardless, and NPCs still have to give you the helpful information, assistance and absolute loyalty no matter how much of a prat you are...

Everyone's there to have fun, not to play second fiddle to a grandstander who wants to live out their fantasy of being the biggest meanest badass on the planet without any fear of the consequences that that sort of behaviour would attract in the real world.

I don't mind character's surprising the hell out of me with strange and unusual approaches or even doing the Big Damn Heroes shtick or doing things because it'd "be/look cool"- leaping over lava onto a flying wyvern to help the party is all well and good.

I just expect them to be "team players".

There are degrees, of course. One player delighted in playing obnoxious, unlikeable characters - but his actions were never enough to jeopardise the security and safety of the team. They all cheered when his characters got killed (and the player cheered loudest of all), but they never were moved to want to kill him themselves. The characters were "quirky" in the extreme but at least had the redeeming qualities of being useful and not being so obnoxious that they became a liability.

Compared with other players whose actions made so many powerful enemies and alienated so many potential allies that the game rapidly became unplayable - or risked getting their own characters and the rest of the team killed - much to the annoyance of the other players and the GM.

A number of them were killed by their own teams - much to the surprise and dismay of the players in question as that didn't fit their "it's all about me" attitude. After all, they're the badass anti-hero STAR of the show...

I hate having to think up ways of avoiding a TPK that would not have even been likely to occur if it weren't for one grandstander going to extraordinary lengths to honk-off everyone within 200km...
 

Hejdun

First Post
Everything you describe is the players reacting to the referee. To me, that's still just sitting around waiting for something to happen.

How about being proactive? How about taking the initiative and making the referee react instead?

To me, that's the hallmark of a good player.

If you're not doing nothing, then you're doing something which will force a DM response, which will give you fodder to react to.
 



Thornir Alekeg

Albatross!
Everything you describe is the players reacting to the referee. To me, that's still just sitting around waiting for something to happen.

How about being proactive? How about taking the initiative and making the referee react instead?

To me, that's the hallmark of a good player.
I am going to take some exception here. Proactive players are a good thing, when done well and in the spirit of the game the DM is trying to provide. Proactive players doing odd things just to "make the referee react" may just be jerks.
 

I am going to take some exception here. Proactive players are a good thing, when done well and in the spirit of the game the DM is trying to provide. Proactive players doing odd things just to "make the referee react" may just be jerks.
And surprisingly it's still better to deal with a jerk than an empty suit in a chair. A jerk at least supplies something to work with.
 

Crothian

First Post
And surprisingly it's still better to deal with a jerk than an empty suit in a chair. A jerk at least supplies something to work with.

Not always. I've run into some proactive players that hog the spot light and make it all about them. Or what they are proactive about and trying to do is against the tone and ideas of the campaign. I've played in city based campaigns were the proactive player just wanted to leave the city when it was decided by the group that the campaign was going to happen just in the city for instance.
 

Wolf1066

First Post
Not always. I've run into some proactive players that hog the spot light and make it all about them. Or what they are proactive about and trying to do is against the tone and ideas of the campaign.
That I can relate to. There are some "jerks" who turn up with the attitude that 5 other players and a GM get together so that the jerk can have fun starring in his/her own adventure show.

"I know, I'll rape the Burgomeister's daughter, that's the "way out there" kind of guy my character is... whaddya mean the whole village is advancing with pitchforks? We're the good guys. They'd better watch their attitude or we won't get rid of that bloody dragon for them. Why are you guys all looking at me like that? This is supposed to be a fun game, ferchrissakes."
 

Hussar

Legend
That I can relate to. There are some "jerks" who turn up with the attitude that 5 other players and a GM get together so that the jerk can have fun starring in his/her own adventure show.

"I know, I'll rape the Burgomeister's daughter, that's the "way out there" kind of guy my character is... whaddya mean the whole village is advancing with pitchforks? We're the good guys. They'd better watch their attitude or we won't get rid of that bloody dragon for them. Why are you guys all looking at me like that? This is supposed to be a fun game, ferchrissakes."

Hey! That's not what I said... :p

Joking aside, there is too much of a good thing. An active (or proactive if you like) player is FAR better than the wallflower. To me, it goes something like this:

Wallflower<active<proactive>douchebag

Or something like that. :D
 

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