5.5E/One D&D Is the 5E player base going to split?


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It isn't that they can't, it is that they should expect some attrition. They should also, hopefully, elicit feedback and if enough people feel a certain way, adjust their design.
People who will purchase the 2024 revision
  • some % of core fans, either people who just purchase everything or most everything dnd, or because they like the revisions ("finally, a good ranger!" etc)
  • new players: after 2024, the new core books will be the version available for purchase, and thus the main audience for these books are not existing players, but new ones

People who will not purchase the 2024 books
  • existing casual players who at most currently own a phb. This is a large segment of the player base. For example in my group, maybe half of the players actually own a phb, and I'm probably the only one who has a few other books. These players may very well end up playing with the revised rules, but only because the invested members (e.g. the DM) will have bought the new version
  • core fans who are unhappy or unimpressed with the (probably minimal) revisions

In sum: the main audience is a) brand new players and b) existing DMs.

I think it is pretty common a reasonable for people to feel a little put out when they realize the thing they have loved is changing in a way that makes it not that thing anymore. it doesn't mean that person is demanding anything. It's just an expression of grief or frustration or disappointment.

Sure...but it is a bit curious with something as low tech as a ttrpg. As you mention, there are people happily playing OD&D, Basic, 1e-4e, which is easy to do because all you need are your old books, which are still available in a variety of formats. I mean, every few years apple introduces new ports on their computers, which means that you have to get dongles for all your peripheral devices (and eventually new devices). Or, entire software platforms disappear or change in a way that makes it so that you have to spent a ton of time migrating all your data elsewhere. Comparatively, a ttrpg edition change is not much of an inconvenience.
 


Reynard

Legend
Sure...but it is a bit curious with something as low tech as a ttrpg. As you mention, there are people happily playing OD&D, Basic, 1e-4e, which is easy to do because all you need are your old books, which are still available in a variety of formats. I mean, every few years apple introduces new ports on their computers, which means that you have to get dongles for all your peripheral devices (and eventually new devices). Or, entire software platforms disappear or change in a way that makes it so that you have to spent a ton of time migrating all your data elsewhere. Comparatively, a ttrpg edition change is not much of an inconvenience.
And there you go being dismissive. "Yeah, sure, people feel that way... But they shouldn't."

I don't think we should tell people how to feel about things. Let them be mad, or upset, or sad, without telling them.whst you think about how they feel.

I have said this before but I think it bears repeating: role playing is an intimate hobby. You share your fantasies with other people. As such, it elicits more intense feelings than other hobbies and interests. It's worth noting that when we drift from judging games to judging the people playing them.

And just to be clear: I'm not one of those people that is sad or angry or frustrated in this case, but I have been with other editions or other games.
 

People who will purchase the 2024 revision
  • some % of core fans, either people who just purchase everything or most everything dnd, or because they like the revisions ("finally, a good ranger!" etc)
  • new players: after 2024, the new core books will be the version available for purchase, and thus the main audience for these books are not existing players, but new ones

People who will not purchase the 2024 books
  • existing casual players who at most currently own a phb. This is a large segment of the player base. For example in my group, maybe half of the players actually own a phb, and I'm probably the only one who has a few other books. These players may very well end up playing with the revised rules, but only because the invested members (e.g. the DM) will have bought the new version
  • core fans who are unhappy or unimpressed with the (probably minimal) revisions

In sum: the main audience is a) brand new players and b) existing DMs.



Sure...but it is a bit curious with something as low tech as a ttrpg. As you mention, there are people happily playing OD&D, Basic, 1e-4e, which is easy to do because all you need are your old books, which are still available in a variety of formats. I mean, every few years apple introduces new ports on their computers, which means that you have to get dongles for all your peripheral devices (and eventually new devices). Or, entire software platforms disappear or change in a way that makes it so that you have to spent a ton of time migrating all your data elsewhere. Comparatively, a ttrpg edition change is not much of an inconvenience.
Actually, all you need are your old books, and people willing to play with you using them.
 

And there you go being dismissive. "Yeah, sure, people feel that way... But they shouldn't."

I don't think we should tell people how to feel about things. Let them be mad, or upset, or sad, without telling them.whst you think about how they feel.
I'm simply making a claim: it's not difficult to play whatever edition of a ttrpg you like, and that will still be true in the future, in part because ttrpgs are so low tech. As players, we are much less reliant on the company producing the game than, say, video game players who have to depend on companies hosting servers, or hardware changes, or any number of other things that would make it impossible for them to play their game.
 

JEB

Legend
Wel, they are doing something with the free online Monsters. Maybe do free online Compendiums, and do illustrated collection books full of popularly used Mosnters. Who knows. But they are not limited.by traditional models.
I have a strong suspicion that subsequent volumes of the new Monstrous Compendium may not be free; just this first one, to get people hooked.
 

Reynard

Legend
I'm simply making a claim: it's not difficult to play whatever edition of a ttrpg you like, and that will still be true in the future, in part because ttrpgs are so low tech. As players, we are much less reliant on the company producing the game than, say, video game players who have to depend on companies hosting servers, or hardware changes, or any number of other things that would make it impossible for them to play their game.
Maybe, but players are reliant on companies to produce new official content and network externalities are a real thing in relation to finding groups.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
I have a strong suspicion that subsequent volumes of the new Monstrous Compendium may not be free; just this first one, to get people hooked.
They did say the series would.be free, but didn't give specifics beyond they would do more, and they would be free.
 

JEB

Legend
They did say the series would.be free, but didn't give specifics beyond they would do more, and they would be free.
Right, they're kind of vague about it - you get access to the digital MC, the first volume is free, there will be other free stuff (like the Spelljammer adventure)... but until MC Volume 2 arrives I wouldn't assume the whole stack will be free.
 

players are reliant on companies to produce new official content
How so? Not only can you make endless campaigns of your own (a long and storied tradition particularly w/ dnd), but there are massive volumes of 5e content out there, not just from wotc, but also from 3rd party and individual publishers. Again, it's not like a videogame where you play the official content and then you're done.
 

Unwise

Adventurer
I like to skip to the end of long threads like this to see what the latest discussion is. It is normally either something really odd yet heated like:

"I told you, Ferrets are a type of muskilid! and I fail to see how the breeding cycle of tortoises is even relevant to this discussion of Keats!"

Or it is Morrus telling two people to be civilised as their off-topic discussion of My Little Pony themed D&D fanfic has become a flamewar.

I was disappointed to see we remained on topic this time.

Back on topic though: I think D&D players will keep speaking the same language with any 5.5 split, it will be a minor different in accent at most I think. I can't see any significant changes splintering things in any meaningful way. We are not readopting ThAC0 or a 4e style change. I think it will be less of a difference than 4e was to 4e Essentials. They still play the exact same way, with a minor tweak to the design philosophy.
 


Parmandur

Book-Friend
Right, they're kind of vague about it - you get access to the digital MC, the first volume is free, there will be other free stuff (like the Spelljammer adventure)... but until MC Volume 2 arrives I wouldn't assume the whole stack will be free.
No, they said there would be a free series of the Monstrous Compendiums specifically.
 

JEB

Legend
No, they said there would be a free series of the Monstrous Compendiums specifically.
Oh? Where? From Wizards/D&D Beyond sources, I see the following...

This is just the first volume of monsters coming to your D&D Beyond account! You'll be able to collect more creatures from across the multiverse as additional releases of Monstrous Compendium drop!

An ever-expanding digital collection of goodies to unlock can all be found at D&D Beyond, starting with the Monstrous Compendium - Volume One: Spelljammer Creatures.

Neither promises that future volumes will be free.

All the other sources I can find are third-party news sites, some of which are interpreting it as "all free" and others as "Volume One is free." (I actually can't even find a Wizards source that promises the free Spelljammer adventure, though that I don't doubt so much.)

Was there something in a Youtube video or such?

EDIT: Sidenote, you don't even need a DDB account to see Volume One now: Spelljammer Creatures
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
Oh? Where? From Wizards/D&D Beyond sources, I see the following...





Neither promises that future volumes will be free.

All the other sources I can find are third-party news sites, some of which are interpreting it as "all free" and others as "Volume One is free." (I actually can't even find a Wizards source that promises the free Spelljammer adventure, though that I don't doubt so much.)

Was there something in a Youtube video or such?

EDIT: Sidenote, you don't even need a DDB account to see Volume One now: Spelljammer Creatures
From your first link, calling it "the first in a series of monthly drops available to all D&D Beyond users!" And they talked about it being an ongoing free series of Monstrous Compendiums in the after show for the Direct, whixh is whynall the news sites mention it.
 

teitan

Legend
Unless you don't like how they changed the monsters (particularly spellcasting ones), or removed cultural content from the race rules altogether in favor of a "make up the fluff you want, you don't need mechanics" approach to it.
That only matters to people like us, we aren’t the majority of players.
 


JEB

Legend
From your first link, calling it "the first in a series of monthly drops available to all D&D Beyond users!" And they talked about it being an ongoing free series of Monstrous Compendiums in the after show for the Direct, whixh is whynall the news sites mention it.
It being the first in a series, and it being free, doesn't make the entire series free...

And I just checked the D&D Direct, the relevant part starts at 48:48. They say the series will continue to be updated (49:40) and throughout the year there will be more (49:55). At no point do they clearly say it'll all remain free, only that it'll be available. (The video does earlier confirm the free Spelljammer starter adventure, FWIW.)

As for the after-show, if the only record we have is what's on third-party news sites, as mentioned they're also not consistent about whether or not all the installments will be free, or just this one.

I'm not saying they definitely won't be free. I'm just saying there's no definitive statement, which leaves room for future installments to cost money. And it wouldn't surprise me if that's exactly what they do.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
It being the first in a series, and it being free, doesn't make the entire series free...

And I just checked the D&D Direct, the relevant part starts at 48:48. They say the series will continue to be updated (49:40) and throughout the year there will be more (49:55). At no point do they clearly say it'll all remain free, only that it'll be available. (The video does earlier confirm the free Spelljammer starter adventure, FWIW.)

As for the after-show, if the only record we have is what's on third-party news sites, as mentioned they're also not consistent about whether or not all the installments will be free, or just this one.

I'm not saying they definitely won't be free. I'm just saying there's no definitive statement, which leaves room for future installments to cost money. And it wouldn't surprise me if that's exactly what they do.
I'm pretty certain they clarified in the aftershow that this is a free series.
 

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