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D&D General Let's Share Our Alternate Lore

Lanefan

Victoria Rules
@GnomeWorks - that's a cool document!

The only thing I found confusing is that under "character alignment" on page 1 it states you have advantage on saves (among other benefits) vs your beam's opposites, but there's no clear diagram or list* that shows which beams are opposed to which. The coloured list to the left also doesn't specify which beams oppose which.

There's some guidance in the "Other Beams" section of each write-up, but even there it only says which beams are friendly to the one being written up and doesn't state whether those not mentioned are neutral to that beam or opposed to it.

* - or if there is a list it's buried deep enough in the text that I didn't see it.
 

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GnomeWorks

Adventurer
The only thing I found confusing is that under "character alignment" on page 1 it states you have advantage on saves (among other benefits) vs your beam's opposites, but there's no clear diagram or list* that shows which beams are opposed to which. The coloured list to the left also doesn't specify which beams oppose which.

That... is a suprisingly good point. I'm not sure how I managed to write out all that and not mention how and which beams oppose one another.

I'll address that in the next editing pass, thanks.
 

I like to take inspiration from pre-D&D and non-D&D sources when reimagining monsters. Sometimes I like to mix stuff together from a variety of sources.

For example, I decided to reinvent the illithid-githyanki war using other monsters instead. The illithids I replaced with a combination of inspirations from Slavelords of Cydonia, Dreamscarred Press’ psionics, Call of Cthulhu, Frictional Games’ SOMA, etc. These became the Cult of Cthulhu, a generic mix of seafood monsters, brain parasites, fish people cultists, and hybrids thereof. The githyanki I replaced with dark elves, who I syncretized with inspirations including Everquest, Raging Heroes, Glorantha, WarCraft, Warhammer 40k, Monte Cook, Tolkien, etc. The dark elves were originally normal elves, who are a dryad-like race that shares their soul across animal and plant symbiotes. Then a fire war devastated their race, and the mutilated survivors became the dark elves by using a combination of migrating to the shadowfell, hunting/eating demons, developing psionics, chaositech/biotech, generally mutating, pacting a Tiamat/Ungoliant-expy, etc. Their travels brought them into contact with the Cthulhoids, who they naturally started a war with in order to steal Cthulhoid chaositech/biotech and resist enslavement. Oh, and the dark elves ride dragon-spiders into battle.

The idea is very embryonic right now, but someday I’d like to write short stories or something.
 

Fenris-77

Small God of the Dozens
Then a fire war devastated their race, and the mutilated survivors became the dark elves by using a combination of migrating to the shadowfell, hunting/eating demons, developing psionics, chaositech/biotech, generally mutating, pacting a Tiamat/Ungoliant-expy, etc. Their travels brought them into contact with the Cthulhoids, who they naturally started a war with in order to steal Cthulhoid chaositech/biotech and resist enslavement. Oh, and the dark elves ride dragon-spiders into battle.
That's ... quite a combination. Just wearing black and going a little emo for a while wasn't going to cut it, eh?
 


Bohandas

Adventurer
My favoritte homebrew entities are what I call the "Nowheres." The hang out in the temporal realm (in this campaign every thing has a temporal strand, similar to its soul, that can be perceived and manipulate from the temporal realm, one can imagine that you can see everyones silver chord from this realm and some creatures, the Nowheres, manipulate these strands which directly affects which objects interact with which....

If two objects temporal stands cross or intersect that JUST MEANS that thos eobjects causally interacted with one another in a substantive way (what counts as substantive is for the philosophers of the world to figure out, but one can imagine that these temporal strands are quite literally bunched together in intricate ways and its the Nowheres task to move these strands around... They seem to be singularlyl and mindlessly and endlessly moving these strands about in some seeminlgy random way..

They are the size of galaxies, nay universes themselves... being somewhat of an inverse to the Astral plane, the temporal plane is a 'space of no spaces' where spatial dimensions seem to be altogether and essentially different than any other plane of existences..... The Nowheres resemble beholders in the sense that their body just is a massive 360-degree-seeing eye encased in a transparent diamond like skin/flesh with untold numbers of transparent arms stretched out constantly moving objects temporal strands about....

Noweheres have no temp[oral strand, i.e. soul... They only stop from their mission to destroy anyone or anything that succeeds or even merly forms an intention to change in any way any temporal strand (that is if that ebing actually succeeds at entering the temporal plane whreby their consiousness necessarily and inevitabl;y becomes apparent to the Nowheres (no tricking these things if you goto the temporal plane with even an intention to change time you will be attacked by one of the most dominant beings in existence..... Some say they are gods of fate or scions of fate..
They sound a bit like the sidereal exalted from Exalted but with a bit of the Monitors from DC Comics and the Kelvans from Star Trek thrown in
 

Dormammu

Explorer
My favorite personal conceit is that magic enchantment only works a single way: an item can be enchanted with qualities but not any great deal of power. The power of the item grows over time. There are no exceptions to this rule in my metaphysics.

Thus, magic items become valued antiques and artifacts. A +3 weapon is hundreds of years old and can be identified by its style in much the same way real world antiques are appraised. All magic items have runes, so finding a runed item immediately sets the hopeful mind racing: did I find a magical relic or a simple forgery?

I like it as a unique setting element, but I also like that it prevents many elements of magic items I don’t like: players can’t really make anything more powerful than a potion or scroll, items aren’t bought and sold as simple commodities but instead become prized and irreplaceable items. A lord’s power might rest on the fact that their personal guard have magical items.

Seeking them out as treasure hunters suddenly makes more sense, as lost items out in the world could be the gateway to wealth and power. It makes so much of RPG magic item interaction more interesting and plausible (for me).
 

Coroc

Hero
It is fairly common for us GMs in the process of our adventure creation and world building to incorporate alternate lore for existing D&D elements -- creatures, races, classes, items, spells and on and on.

What cool alternate lore do you have for things in your campaign? Why? How did it come about? Is it just for one setting or basically any time you run D&D? Is creating alternate lore common for you, or rare?

For my part, I like to mess with the origins of monsters. Ogres, for example, are usually the bastard children of hags and noblemen who traded their seed to the hag for some boon or spell or whatever. Sometimes the ogre comes for his inheritance when the nobleman dies. Sometimes the nobleman decides to hunt down the monster (using the PCs) and the PCs find themselves in a weird moral position. I am sure I read it in some novel, myth or other game at some point and did not create it myself, but I just like the way it gives inherent backstory to a standard dumb monster.

If some player wanted to play a tiefling in my greyhawk campaign (no one actually did chose to) it would have been mandatory that he is of devlish (lawful) origin, because that would give him additional reason to oppose Iuz (who is a demon/chaotic).

Also I do not use the elven or dwarven, gnomish or Halfling pantheon, elves usually worship Ellonah dwarves and gnomes worship Ulaa. That simplifies things.
Orcs worship Iuz, although they once worshipped Gruumsh.
 
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Coroc

Hero
Elves are formless things of mist and emphemera who seek to drain the mortal ‘substance’ from humanoid victims and form it in to new physical bodies which they are able to infuse themselves into.

Goblins are all amphibians, originally semi aquatic swamp dwellers they have adapted to thrive in urban sewers

Trolls are male Hags.

Gnomes have clans of around 101 in which there will be one breeding female Matriarch and 1 - 4 senior males. The other gnomes in the clan are all the children of the breeding Matriarch. They also have no definite gender and can remain in this juvenile state until maturity is triggered by the death of the Matriarch And which point a new female will develop and part of the clan will break off and take her to find a new burrow (and new mates). Gnomes also have a habit of using woad to dye their skins blue

Does the matriarch have a beard, like most dwarven women?
 

Here are some more lores from my mind palace:

I watched Tensei Slime and got inspired to have monsters "evolve" into other monsters like Pokemon. For example: rot grub > carrion crawler > carrion moth > carrion dragon, or tenebrous worm > gloomwing > shadow dragon.

I like to expand on the aboleth with numerous variants including parasites, hybrids, and slave races.
 


Tonguez

A suffusion of yellow
Here are some more lores from my mind palace:

I watched Tensei Slime and got inspired to have monsters "evolve" into other monsters like Pokemon. For example: rot grub > carrion crawler > carrion moth > carrion dragon, or tenebrous worm > gloomwing > shadow dragon.

I like to expand on the aboleth with numerous variants including parasites, hybrids, and slave races.

I do like the rot grub-carrion crawler-moth link, thats rather cool bit of ecology there. .
(I’m not sure how I feel about grubs evolving into Dragons though :)
)
 

Cool collection. There are a few other variants you might want to check out Lazy GM One Shots: Aboleths, Weekly Wonders - Advanced Aboleths, Lords of Madness, and Sunken Empires each have some.
I prefer OGC.

Anyway, does anybody here know how to convert 3.x statistics to 5e? I have a copy of Slavelords of Cydonia but it’s from 2004. The new aboleth variants in the appendix are cool, but I haven’t seen them reprinted and they’re not compatible with 5e.

For reference, these are the new aboleths or “lethid” in the book:
  • Mohldaleth: small parasites that burrow into a humanoid host and influence their mind. (Comparable to puppeteers)
  • Nihileth: flying octopuses that engulf a victim’s head and controls their body. (Comparable to mind flayers)
  • Rgleth: flying octopuses that attach to larger animals and manipulate their behavior.
  • Shibboleth: giant aboleth that control swarms of small animals for use as spies.
  • True Aboleth: giant aboleth whose infectious slime turns their victims into living zombies under their control.
 


Voadam

Legend
I prefer OGC.

So only check out the three out of the four that are OGC;)

Anyway, does anybody here know how to convert 3.x statistics to 5e?

Quick and dirty would be to change the stats to 5e ranges. Use their total hp as a guide for CR or assign a desired one and give them appropriate hp for it, then use the new stats and CR to recalculate their attack and save bonuses as well as their save DCs. Eyeball how tough their 3e AC is for the CR then try to place it at a similar toughness to hit in the bound 5e range. Ignore minor things like most feats and just translate important abilities and powers. That covers most of what's relevant, how tough it is to get to their bag of hp, and how good they are at getting at your PCs' bag of hps.

For a lot of stuff just apply 5e rules to the 3e descriptions so monster casters still have to concentrate but they can multiattack without being restricted to five foot stepping.
 

I prefer OGC.

Anyway, does anybody here know how to convert 3.x statistics to 5e? I have a copy of Slavelords of Cydonia but it’s from 2004. The new aboleth variants in the appendix are cool, but I haven’t seen them reprinted and they’re not compatible with 5e.

For reference, these are the new aboleths or “lethid” in the book:
  • Mohldaleth: small parasites that burrow into a humanoid host and influence their mind. (Comparable to puppeteers)
  • Nihileth: flying octopuses that engulf a victim’s head and controls their body. (Comparable to mind flayers)
  • Rgleth: flying octopuses that attach to larger animals and manipulate their behavior.
  • Shibboleth: giant aboleth that control swarms of small animals for use as spies.
  • True Aboleth: giant aboleth whose infectious slime turns their victims into living zombies under their control.
@S'mon has some experience and advice. This is some examples from other posts of how he goes about it:

"The general rule if in doubt is "divide number above 10 by 2" - so AC 25 becomes AC 17 (or 18 if that looks better). Use attribute bonus for saves, only give Proficiency if it looks really necessary. Hit Points should normally be increased +50%. Damage is trickier, but +50% generally seems to work likewise. Abilities that disable PCs for the duration should generally become save-each-round. Recalculate Attack Bonus based on Profiency (derived from CR), and Attribute bonus. "

"Converting damage and hit points - I started off doing roughly x1.5 damage and x1.5 hit points (while attack bonus is calculated off stat bonus + Proficiency bonus). This worked for a long time, but at very high levels gives excessive hit point totals, especially where AC is good, so for double-digit CR monsters it is often best to keep the PF hit points as listed."
 

S'mon

Legend
@S'mon has some experience and advice. This is some examples from other posts of how he goes about it:

"The general rule if in doubt is "divide number above 10 by 2" - so AC 25 becomes AC 17 (or 18 if that looks better). Use attribute bonus for saves, only give Proficiency if it looks really necessary. Hit Points should normally be increased +50%. Damage is trickier, but +50% generally seems to work likewise. Abilities that disable PCs for the duration should generally become save-each-round. Recalculate Attack Bonus based on Profiency (derived from CR), and Attribute bonus. "

"Converting damage and hit points - I started off doing roughly x1.5 damage and x1.5 hit points (while attack bonus is calculated off stat bonus + Proficiency bonus). This worked for a long time, but at very high levels gives excessive hit point totals, especially where AC is good, so for double-digit CR monsters it is often best to keep the PF hit points as listed."

Yup, that's about it. I'm currently running PF Spires of Xin-Shalast converted to 5e and the above still works at level 20, though as I said I normally used the listed PF hp at this level, not x1.5.

AC & DCs are always divide by 2 then add 5 (same formula as above). Cap at 30.
Damage around x1.5, though at very high level listed damage is pretty much ok.
Attributes over 20 divide by 2 then add 10, capping at 30, eg STR 25 > STR 12.5+10 = 22 or 23.
Calculate Attack Bonus off attribute bonus + proficiency bonus.

Lose all the fiddly bits, keep 1-2 cool/thematic powers and calculate as above.
 
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So only check out the three out of the four that are OGC;)



Quick and dirty would be to change the stats to 5e ranges. Use their total hp as a guide for CR or assign a desired one and give them appropriate hp for it, then use the new stats and CR to recalculate their attack and save bonuses as well as their save DCs. Eyeball how tough their 3e AC is for the CR then try to place it at a similar toughness to hit in the bound 5e range. Ignore minor things like most feats and just translate important abilities and powers. That covers most of what's relevant, how tough it is to get to their bag of hp, and how good they are at getting at your PCs' bag of hps.

For a lot of stuff just apply 5e rules to the 3e descriptions so monster casters still have to concentrate but they can multiattack without being restricted to five foot stepping.
@S'mon has some experience and advice. This is some examples from other posts of how he goes about it:

"The general rule if in doubt is "divide number above 10 by 2" - so AC 25 becomes AC 17 (or 18 if that looks better). Use attribute bonus for saves, only give Proficiency if it looks really necessary. Hit Points should normally be increased +50%. Damage is trickier, but +50% generally seems to work likewise. Abilities that disable PCs for the duration should generally become save-each-round. Recalculate Attack Bonus based on Profiency (derived from CR), and Attribute bonus. "

"Converting damage and hit points - I started off doing roughly x1.5 damage and x1.5 hit points (while attack bonus is calculated off stat bonus + Proficiency bonus). This worked for a long time, but at very high levels gives excessive hit point totals, especially where AC is good, so for double-digit CR monsters it is often best to keep the PF hit points as listed."
Yup, that's about it. I'm currently running PF Spires of Xin-Shalast converted to 5e and the above still works at level 20, though as I said I normally used the listed PF hp at this level, not x1.5.

AC & DCs are always divide by 2 then add 5 (same formula as above). Cap at 30.
Damage around x1.5, though at very high level listed damage is pretty much ok.
Attributes over 20 divide by 2 then add 10, capping at 30, eg STR 25 > STR 12.5+10 = 22 or 23.
Calculate Attack Bonus off attribute bonus + proficiency bonus.

Lose all the fiddly bits, keep 1-2 cool/thematic powers and calculate as above.
At the moment, I'm super lazy and more interested in Mythras Classic Fantasy. If anybody wants to convert statistics, I'm posting them in their own thread. First one was the aboleth subraces from Grim Tales and Slavelords of Cydonia.
 

Ash Mantle

Adventurer
This is an excellent thread!

Some Mirrorverse Deities.
Vecna (CG): The bubbly, always cheerful, happy-go-lucky Vecna is the deity of knowledge used for the benefit of all irrespective of consequences. To those hurt by hidden or destructive secrets, he shelters and cares for; to those undone by intrigue, he creates illusions and realities that serve no other purpose but to lift the spirits of those wronged.
He teaches that happiness is sacred, that violence and force, no matter how necessary is an option that must only be used as a last resort.
His puissance is equality, and will never willingly harm another, even when so forced.
He is the Free Spirit, the Friend Between.


Boccob (N/CN): The deity of strength without focus; the drooling, babbling Boccob ranks among the most obtuse and mentally deficient of all deities. There is no clarity to his purpose, no foresight to his actions; he lives for the moment and woe betide those who gets in his way. His singular focus is near mindless; his actions as a repeating track, always looping upon itself.
He despises arcana in all forms, a near psychotic hatred that manifests itself in a null arcane field that renders all forms of magic impotent.
He is the meddler, the intruder, his petty intrigues the blind, stumbling steps of an asinine fool.
BOCCOB SMASH!!!


Corellon Larethian (LE): The oppressive Corellon organises brutal genocides against all who are not elves. Only he may command the elves to their crushing victory against Creation; only his dicta is accepted as the One, True Reality. There can be no free thought, no free actions, no free will in his infinite reign as doing so will only open the door to chaos; that which is offensive and redundant, and must be purged with violent and extreme prejudice. Such is the ineffable fate of chaos.
To Corellon, suffering is the natural state of existence, and to this end, he seeks to return Creation to this Truth by any means; manipulating both physical and spiritual matter to cause agony unending.
 

SkidAce

Legend
Supporter
I had a race of psionic based ancients, I kept revising their stats through the different editions. But I am better at tweaking than balancing.

So now I use Kalashtar stats and some fluff. My Alyn race were human(ish) and were immortal unless killed on the Astral. So, much of the spirit lore fits, and the stuff that doesn't is specific to the ones in Eberron.

This makes my race the progenitors of the Kalashtar, thanks for the assist Keith!
 

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