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Mad at Paizo?

S'mon

Legend
It’s not just nerfdom. People get very attached to their football teams and get pretty passionate about every aspect of them. Luckily in nerfdom, thugs supporting Critically Role don’t go around getting drunk and beating up Matt Coleville supporters at conventions.
Well the Matts are pals I'm sure, but we have seen some nerd-on-nerd violence recently as part of the Culture Wars.
 
It’s not just nerfdom. People get very attached to their football teams and get pretty passionate about every aspect of them. Luckily in nerfdom, thugs supporting Critically Role don’t go around getting drunk and beating up Matt Coleville supporters at conventions.

Let’s be honest, this unhealthy attachment is used and relied upon by those subjects to make money. In advertising, in merchandising, in subscriptions. Money money money.

Critical Role is no different. It taps into a part of human nature. The fact that it’s streamed live, the ability to commentate on twitch, the YouTube comments, forum posts etc all designed to make us feel connected to our subject.

As with all things there are pro’s and cons.
Wow, are you actually comparing football (soccer) hooligans to fans of Critical Role? Because that's just wrong. This analogy is crass and, frankly, very offensive.
 

Haffrung

Explorer
I think what some people are taking issue with is your saying certain ways of roleplaying is wrong. And contrived.
I never said any kind of roleplaying is wrong. I said I found Critical Role comes across as contrived to me. All sorts of things strike me as contrived. Heck, every single podcast of live stream is contrived to the extent that everyone acts differently when there's a mic or camera in front of them. Some are just more contrived than others.

And I didn't come in here 'ranting' about CR. I don't give a shit about CR. But it came up in a thread and I expressed an off-hand critical comment about, no different from how I might make an offhand about The Big Bang Theory, Destiny 2, or any of the other hundreds of entertainment properties that aren't my jam. But I should have known better to make even that passing comment about that particular property in this particular place.
 

cmad1977

Explorer
I understand that American soccer fans are a very civilised bunch who rarely get emotionally over-invested in their team.

...Just like CR fans. :p
You obviously never been to an LAFC game. Civilized? Yes.
Dispassionate....

No.

;)
 

Xenonnonex

Explorer
I never said any kind of roleplaying is wrong. I said I found Critical Role comes across as contrived to me. All sorts of things strike me as contrived. Heck, every single podcast of live stream is contrived to the extent that everyone acts differently when there's a mic or camera in front of them. Some are just more contrived than others.
Did you not say the CR cast are actors theatrically playing D&D? So in your eyes their style of roleplaying is wrong. And similarly then people theatrically playing RPGs is the wrong way to go about roleplaying. Because that comes as across as contrived and is not real roleplaying.
I am sure all of the results from dice rolling is contrived. And all of the reactions to the dice results are contrived.

And I didn't come in here 'ranting' about CR.
Just ignore it dude.
 

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
I think I have a worry that whatever the intention of the Matt Mercer, Critical Role becomes seen as the correct, standard or best way to play D&D.

I don’t personally like the show, but choose not to watch more than the 3 or 4 episodes I have. I have that ability and can choose to ignore.

However it seems to have turned into a VERY big part of how d&d is promoted, perceived and referenced. That I have no control over and can’t avoid.

This doesn’t seem to be the case for other streams like Matt C or Dice Camera Action.
Matt Coleville's Strongholds & Followers was the biggest RRG kickstarter in history. Perkins has run Acq. Inc. games before many thousands of live and live-stream audiences, including games live streamed to live audiences in movie theaters around the USA. In terms of material actually used at the table I feel safe betting that Colveville's book is much more widely used than Mercer's setting book.

Even in the Hollywood scene, Joe Maganiello probably has had a greater impact on the how D&D is promoted and perceived than the other as he's talking about it on the top talk shows.

Critical Role certainly has a huge impact on the hobby and its popularity, but don't discount the influence of better selling game authors and better known celebrities.

That's not discounting the CR teams amazing accomplishments but we are in a golden age of D&D where A-list celebrities are promoting it, tie-ins with major TV shows (Stranger Things, Rick & Morty) are happening, and third-party fans are creating large fan bases and turning their home-brew rules, settings, and stories into franchises worth millions.
 

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
Maybe its because I'm running third-party material (Rappan Athuk mega dungeon, set in the Lost Lands, by Frog God Games), but I have to seek out Critical Role. I don't use syrin scape, and the You Tube channels I follow that are focused on D&D (mainly Coleville, Web DM, and Animated Spell Book mostly) only very rarely mention critical role and You Tube just isn't putting CR content in my feed. The only time I hear anything about CR is when they are brought up in forums, but it is hardly common enough to be off putting. I guess I am not finding it too hard to ignore CR.

Not that I have anything against them. I backed the Kickstarter for their animated series and bought the setting book. But I just don't have the time and interest to listen to their streams.

Lets lay the cards out... I find CR and Matt Mercer’s style pretentious and overly theatrical. I’m not a fan of the players that take part. Neither do I like the soap opera like discussion and debriefing of the sessions after. I don’t doubt that a lot of people like it. However it isn’t my cup of tea. It’s possible that I find it off putting because I’m British and I prefer things a little more understated. Or perhaps the accent jars. It doesn’t really matter the reason. It is my opinion. I wouldn’t normally share the details because it can be seen as negative and doesn’t do anything to change the minds of those that are already fans. However those who find it impossible to believe some might find it off-putting, believe me, it is.

However like it or not MM is now seen as the Ambassador/Paragon of DMing. There are you tube blogs, endless forum posts, product lines discussing and referencing CR. He even appears on my Syrinscape downloads as character voices. It is ubiquitous and you can barely google a D&D topic without CR or MM popping up somewhere. I do not blame them for being popular. Neither do I expect them to do anything different. They are a brand and influencer and they do what they do very effectively. Please allow me to feel uncomfortable as I feel the effect of that influence.

Edited: brand and influencer.
 

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
Do you guys feel threatened by the rising popularity of being geek in the mainstream?
Nope. I think it is great. But I still am uncomfortable discussing it outside of my little gaming cocoon. I keep my gaming hobby very compartmentalized and never discuss it at work or in non-gaming social circles. I think this is generational. Had an attorney I was meeting for coffee start to talk about his and his boyfriend's gaming hobby. Didn't bat an eye to learn he was gay. Was much more surprised to have someone out themselves as a geek in a professional context.

I've also noticed that geekdom isn't really relegated to any specific cliques in my sons' school. The jockey kids, the brainy kids, the theater kids, all like video games, superhero movies, and the gaming groups don't seem to be specific to any one group.

D&D just doesn't seem to have much of a stigma to folks in their 20s and younger.

I think its wonderful.
 

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