D&D Movie/TV More information about Honor Among Thieves

What follows is a list of snippets of recent information about the upcoming D&D movie from a range of sources across the internet. Special thanks goes to CinemaBlend and Collidor!

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  • They hired a language team for all the D&D languages that appear in the movie, including the guy that did the languages.
  • They also have a spell casting geasture team including the guy the designed the geastures for Wandavision.
  • They built 120 sets for the movie.
  • Paramount has the distrubtion rights for the whole world except for Canada and the UK, Hasbro/Eone has ths distribution rights for the UK and Canada.
  • They shot an active volcano.
  • People got so caught up in the movie, folks were in tears at times.
  • It did as well among women as men during test screenings, same with none D&D fans & D&D fans.
  • Led Zepplin songs are hard to get, you can't just throw money at them, they have to like the thing enough to let you use their songs, so this movie already has Led Zepplin seal of approval.
  • The movie has a lot of Easter Eggs.
  • They used D&D Beyond & FR Wiki a lot.
  • Justin Smith was really hard core into the D&D details for his sorcerer character.
  • Jean's paladin required a lot of training and apparently gave him the best butt his ever had (his words).
  • They made the characters contempory in some ways, like some times they question why certain things are the way they are, but not in ways inappropriate to the genre and setting.
  • This movie was clearly made by D&D fans.
  • They didn't design this movie with an eye towards future movies, beyond the fact of making as amazing as possible.
  • This was inspired by ironically the MCU where the foundation was created by 3 solid self contained movies. Latcham insisted on it.
 
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Whizbang Dustyboots

100% that gnome
Man, I can't do voices and now I have to learn multiple languages to run a game. Ugh.

Oh, and I'll have to rename a whole lot of locations in my home brew that I used Parf Edhellen to make Quenya place names.

;)
Nah, we just take the book that WotC or whomever creates and put it into an online translator. All the orcs in my game speak Klingon (don't @ me for being too basic; it works for me) and I just translate the text online.

Online tools that let us create Dwarvish, Elvish and, I don't know what the next in line would be, Celestial*, Abyssal and Infernal would be a great additions to gaming.

* I use Latin for Celestial, which I assume a lot of other people do. I know this is Catholic-centric, but so is D&D's view of the celestials.

(Also, I pick one NPC per game to do a voice for, and the rest sound like me, although maybe with different vocabulary. Everyone seems to appreciate me going 100% for the quasit familiar, or whatever, and no one is demanding I Matt Mercer the rest up.)
 

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Nah, we just take the book that WotC or whomever creates and put it into an online translator. All the orcs in my game speak Klingon (don't @ me for being too basic; it works for me) and I just translate the text online.

Online tools that let us create Dwarvish, Elvish and, I don't know what the next in line would be, Celestial*, Abyssal and Infernal would be a great additions to gaming.

* I use Latin for Celestial, which I assume a lot of other people do. I know this is Catholic-centric, but so is D&D's view of the celestials.

(Also, I pick one NPC per game to do a voice for, and the rest sound like me, although maybe with different vocabulary. Everyone seems to appreciate me going 100% for the quasit familiar, or whatever, and no one is demanding I Matt Mercer the rest up.)

You forgot Draconic. And Halfling. Gnomish. Various human FR languages.
 




In order to use a language, you need at least two characters who can speak it. At this point there only appears to be one tiefling and one druid.

I think we are more likely to hear Thayan and Dwarvish.

That assumes a conversation is the only possible use. She could swear at someone in infernal, talk to herself in infernal, she would translate documents in infernal to common.
 

That assumes a conversation is the only possible use. She could swear at someone in infernal, talk to herself in infernal, she would translate documents in infernal to common.
Yeah, one would imagine infernal is a good language for swearing in! I never really bought the idea of "racial languages" though. Language depends on where you are brought up, not your genetics. I doubt she will speak infernal or abyssal unless she was raised by fiendish parents! As for druidic, I tend to think of that as being more about secret signs. I can't see it having swear words.

We might have her speaking with animals.
 

Yeah, one would imagine infernal is a good language for swearing in! I never really bought the idea of "racial languages" though. Language depends on where you are brought up, not your genetics. I doubt she will speak infernal or abyssal unless she was raised by fiendish parents! As for druidic, I tend to think of that as being more about secret signs. I can't see it having swear words.

We might have her speaking with animals.

Its supernatural language so she might not have to learn it anymore then devils have to be taught it.
 

Nah, we just take the book that WotC or whomever creates and put it into an online translator. All the orcs in my game speak Klingon (don't @ me for being too basic; it works for me) and I just translate the text online.

Online tools that let us create Dwarvish, Elvish and, I don't know what the next in line would be, Celestial*, Abyssal and Infernal would be a great additions to gaming.

* I use Latin for Celestial, which I assume a lot of other people do. I know this is Catholic-centric, but so is D&D's view of the celestials.

(Also, I pick one NPC per game to do a voice for, and the rest sound like me, although maybe with different vocabulary. Everyone seems to appreciate me going 100% for the quasit familiar, or whatever, and no one is demanding I Matt Mercer the rest up.)

Actually no, D&D's view of Angels for example is from Theosphy (hope I spelled that right), not Catholicism, with perhaps influences of Neoplatonism. Other celestials are inspired by other cultures and religions, Empyreans are instead of ancient Greek Mythology for example.
 


Dungeons & Dragons: Honour Among Thieves is heading to MCM London Comic Con 2022.

"On October 30 at MCM London Comic Con 2022, directors Jonathan Goldstein, John Francis Daley (screenwriters of Spider-Man Homecoming) and producer Jeremy Latcham (Spider-Man: Homecoming, Avengers: Age of Ultron, Iron Man, Guardians of the Galaxy) will share some exciting, exclusive content from the new and highly anticipated film Dungeons & Dragons: Honour Among Thieves during a panel dedicated to the movie. Participants will have the chance to discover all the secrets behind the creation of this truly extraordinary and fun adventure."
 

Whizbang Dustyboots

100% that gnome
Actually no, D&D's view of Angels for example is from Theosphy (hope I spelled that right), not Catholicism, with perhaps influences of Neoplatonism. Other celestials are inspired by other cultures and religions, Empyreans are instead of ancient Greek Mythology for example.
The 3E Book of Exalted Deeds' celestial hierarchy apes medieval Catholic thoughts about angels. But yes, there's also a lot of other stuff in the mix, especially as WotC is now explicitly trying to broaden its palette.
 

The 3E Book of Exalted Deeds' celestial hierarchy apes medieval Catholic thoughts about angels. But yes, there's also a lot of other stuff in the mix, especially as WotC is now explicitly trying to broaden its palette.

Catholic/Orthodox Christian Angel hierachy is deprived from Neoplatonist heirachies.


Dionysius the Areopagite drew a lot of his inspiration from the polythiestic Proclus.
 

One piece of information from the official blue ribbon D&D twitter account is tye D&D movie got over 100 million views in 48 hours. If the D&D movie made $10 from each of those views it'd have billion dollars. I think alot of folks are under estimating how much money this movie will make.
 

Sacrosanct

Legend
Publisher
One piece of information from the official blue ribbon D&D twitter account is tye D&D movie got over 100 million views in 48 hours. If the D&D movie made $10 from each of those views it'd have billion dollars. I think alot of folks are under estimating how much money this movie will make.
Yeah, but only 2 out of 100 people who view something for free are willing to pay for it, so...

*Edit for a recent (couple months ago) comparison, I had 13,396 people view the video I had for Twilight Fables. Not how many people saw the ad, but how many people actually clicked it and and went to the site. I had 1412 total backers, and only 329 were from that ad.
 
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Whizbang Dustyboots

100% that gnome
Catholic/Orthodox Christian Angel hierachy is deprived from Neoplatonist heirachies.


Dionysius the Areopagite drew a lot of his inspiration from the polythiestic Proclus.
It seems extremely unlikely to me that Arneson and Gygax were big Proclus geeks.
 



As I remember, early D&D didn't have much in the way of Christianity-inspired "angels". The few celestials in the early stuff where from other cultures, such as coatls and ki-rin. Devas, etc, seemed to come in in 2nd edition, or at least towards the end of 1st.

Really early D&D did, briefly, but none of those Angels survived long term. I'll see if I can get the info on that.
 

As I remember, early D&D didn't have much in the way of Christianity-inspired "angels". The few celestials in the early stuff where from other cultures, such as coatls and ki-rin. Devas, etc, seemed to come in in 2nd edition, or at least towards the end of 1st.


The first Angels were completely unique individuals, not races. Armaiti, Asha, Haurvatat & Ameretat, Khathra Vairya, Mithra, Sraosha, and Vohu Manah. More angels appeared in Dragon #17 (August 1978), including the angel of healing, the angel of wrath, the archangel of mercy, and the seraphim.


But after that the next appearance of Angels was the Catholic/Orthodox/Christian Neoplatonism. "A set of angels appeared in Dragon #35 (March 1980), including the angels of the ninth order, the archangels, the cherubim, the dominions, the powers, the principalities, the seraphim, the thrones, and the virtues."

Then it was the Angels we all know and that went forward except for 4e.

"A completely different type of angelic being first appeared in two issues of Dragon in its "Featured Creatures" column. The astral deva, the monadic deva, and the movanic deva first appeared in Dragon #63 (July 1982).[3] The planetar and solar first appeared in Dragon #64 (August 1982).[4] The agathion, the astral deva, the monadic deva, the movanic deva, the planetar, and the solar appear in the first edition Monster Manual II (1983);[5] these creatures have no collective name and appear alphabetically throughout the book (with the three devas appearing together under "D")."
 

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