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Narrative Dungeons

Retreater

Legend
I remember an article somewhat recently. I think it may have been written by Jeremy Crawford or another well regarded DM. In it, he outlined how to use note cards to describe various rooms in a dungeon and show the relative position of the characters within the dungeon.
My Google research skills have failed me. (Embarrassing to admit from a librarian.) Do any of you know what I'm talking about?
And if you have any ideas on how to make a large dungeon narratively interesting without running a dungeon crawl, I'd be happy to hear them.
 

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D

DQDesign

Guest
there are some suggestions about that in the GM section of the old Numenera core book.
 

What I tend to do when designing my dungeons, is create a list of various 'dungeon details' that I can randomly insert anywhere, at any point. These may include a fresco on a wall, a particular painting or statue, etc. I use these to fill gaps where nothing of interest seems to be happening. These details don't really rely on a specific location, but can contain plot-relevant information that is of use to the players. It adds an extra narrative layer to the way a dungeon plays out. Now instead of having some empty tunnel with non-descript walls, you have a tunnel with some sort of mysterious wall carving, that provides lore to the dungeon (or the campaign itself).
 

Caliburn101

Explorer
What I tend to do when designing my dungeons, is create a list of various 'dungeon details' that I can randomly insert anywhere, at any point. These may include a fresco on a wall, a particular painting or statue, etc. I use these to fill gaps where nothing of interest seems to be happening. These details don't really rely on a specific location, but can contain plot-relevant information that is of use to the players. It adds an extra narrative layer to the way a dungeon plays out. Now instead of having some empty tunnel with non-descript walls, you have a tunnel with some sort of mysterious wall carving, that provides lore to the dungeon (or the campaign itself).

Corridors don't have to be boring... ;P

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Retreater

Legend
What I tend to do when designing my dungeons, is create a list of various 'dungeon details' that I can randomly insert anywhere, at any point. These may include a fresco on a wall, a particular painting or statue, etc. I use these to fill gaps where nothing of interest seems to be happening. These details don't really rely on a specific location, but can contain plot-relevant information that is of use to the players. It adds an extra narrative layer to the way a dungeon plays out. Now instead of having some empty tunnel with non-descript walls, you have a tunnel with some sort of mysterious wall carving, that provides lore to the dungeon (or the campaign itself).

I'm using Raging Swan Press's "GM's Miscellany: Dungeon Dressing" to add some of those little details. It's a solid book, as are Urban and Wilderness Dressing.
 

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