TSR NuTSR Sells Rebound 1E Core Rulebooks For $650 Each

Despite being embroiled in ongoing legal disputes with WotC regarding use of the TSR trademark (amongst other things), NuTSR has posted images of leather-bound compilations of AD&D 1E books they say are rebindings of old material, complete with the disputed logo. They're selling these books for $650 each.

The Deities & Demigods book (middle top in the image) has a typo on the front cover.


rebound1e.jpg


About these books, NuTSR says "Look what just came in. Sorry, we didn't have these in for TSR CON. (in the beginning, WotC said similar to what people below are saying. We said they are rebound of old material. Long story short, WotC said ok no problem, we have it in writing)"

As rebindings, these would be existing books simply being resold. However, the covers with the disputed logo are new.

In early March WotC launched a lawsuit -- (PDF attachment of filing) -- naming TSR, TSR CEO Justin LaNasa personally, and the Dungeon Hobby Shop museum. WotC seeks a judgement that TSR hand over all domains, take down all websites, pay treble damages and costs, hand over all stock and proceeds related to the trademarks, and more.

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Lanefan

Victoria Rules
Unless they were printed on acid-free paper[1], they won't be in any shape to be valuable by then.

[1] And kept out of reach of silverfish
I dunno - other than what I've done to them myself (oops) the ones I have have stood up to the first 40 years of their existence mighty well, on the whole.

I've got other books here that were made of run-of-the-mill basic materials at the time that are 80+ years old and still in good shape.
 

Cordwainer Fish

Imp. Int. Scout Svc. (Dishon. Ret.)
I dunno - other than what I've done to them myself (oops) the ones I have have stood up to the first 40 years of their existence mighty well, on the whole.

I've got other books here that were made of run-of-the-mill basic materials at the time that are 80+ years old and still in good shape.
The really old ones may be made from paper older than the modernist processes that produce an acid pulp.
 


darjr

I crit!
I dunno - other than what I've done to them myself (oops) the ones I have have stood up to the first 40 years of their existence mighty well, on the whole.

I've got other books here that were made of run-of-the-mill basic materials at the time that are 80+ years old and still in good shape.
What did you do?!? What!!!???
 

Lanefan

Victoria Rules
What did you do?!? What!!!???
Very little, and that might be the solution. The only D&D book I've ever somewhat wrecked was my first PH, which took a full cup of tea while open. The binding glue really didn't like that very much, and nor did some of the pages. :)

But other than that, my active books sit in a box behind my DM chair and I pull 'em out when needed; meanwhile the rest sit on the shelf. My active DMG is showing some wear, to be sure; but that's just due to 38 years of fairly constant use.
 


prosfilaes

Adventurer
Looking at the current status of the Cthulhu Mythos in D&DG, Ithaqua and Cthuga are from August Derleth, and Ithaqua at least seems to properly renewed under US copyright. That part of the book seems safe for life+50 countries, but not US or EU. Of course it's the Melnibonean mythos (from the still living Michael Moorcock) and Nehwon mythos (Fritz Lieber, died 1992 and seemingly renewed) that are the real copyright problems; those licenses, even if held by TSR in the first place, would require renegotiation.
 
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Cadence

Legend
Supporter
Looking at the current status of the Cthulhu Mythos in D&DG, Ithaqua and Cthuga are from August Derleth, and Ithaqua at least seems to properly renewed under US copyright. That part of the book seems safe for life+50 countries, but not US or EU. Of course it's the Melnibonean mythos (from the still living Michael Moorcok) and Nehwon mythos (Franz Lieber, died 1992 and seemingly renewed) that are the real copyright problems; those licenses, even if held by TSR in the first place, would require renegotiation.

For the US, isn't copyright for anything from 1923 to 1977 done 95 years after date of first publication? Does life of the author or renewing matter as far as making those older things go longer? (Now trademark is different...)
 

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