D&D 5E So what variant features from Tasha’s are you planning to use?

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen (She/Her/Hers)
With the release of Tasha’s Cauldron and the new class feature variants, I’m putting some serious thought into which features I want to allow and which ones I don’t. And I’d love to hear other folks’ thoughts on the matter. If you’re a DM, which variant features are you planning to use, or to ban, and why? Are you considering any special rules surrounding them (e.g. you can only select one variant feature, or you can take variant features but they replace certain other features?) If you’re a player, which variant features are you most excited to try?

Personally, I like most of the variant features, but I don’t like the idea that they come at no cost. For example, the rogue’s Steady Aim feature is really cool, and seems perfectly fair in a vacuum. But it feels to me like it obviates the main reason to play a melee-based rogue. I don’t want to tell players who want to play ranged rogues they can’t take it, but I also don’t want players who want to play melee rogues to feel like they’re risking their skins for no reason when they could get sneak attack just as easily at range. Or for another example, the monk’s Dedicated Weapon feature seems really cool for players who want to play a monk that uses a longsword (or whatever), but could make players who want to play a Kensai monk feel cheated because one of their subclass’s most interesting features is now freely available to anyone.

Accordingly, my current thinking is that I might make these features available through rewards and/or specialized training. Instead of getting these features automatically at the listed levels, the levels become prerequisites to acquire these features, which might be granted as Boons or learned during downtime. I kind of like the idea that yes, your monk can train to use a longsword as effectively as other monks might use a quarterstaff, but you have to spend X weeks and Y gold training with it to do so, while the Kensai gets it for free. Your ranged rogue can spend their time between adventures doing target practice to perfect their aim, while melee rogues can spend that time carousing. That feels to me like the best way to make these features available to players who want them, while being fair to players whose builds aren’t served by them.

Of course, features that replace existing class features, like the ranger’s Favored Foe and Primal Awareness wouldn’t have this same restriction. You’d just choose which feature you want when you reach the appropriate level.
 

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Stalker0

Legend
A melee rogue with TWF still has the advantage of getting more attacks (and therefore more chances for a SA) than the ranged rogue....so there is that. Now we all talk about how bows are OP in 5e, so I would respect hesitation in making ranged options stronger...but I personally don't think this one will break the bank.
 

Marc_C

Solitary Role Playing
I'm thinking of running a solo adventure with characters created with the sidekick rules (no regular pcs). Parleying with monsters, supernatural regions, magical phenomena and natural hazards are great for solo random generation and inspiration.
 

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen (She/Her/Hers)
A melee rogue with TWF still has the advantage of getting more attacks (and therefore more chances for a SA)
We’re already discussing this in the Steady Aim thread, but two attacks vs. one attack with advantage is the same number of chances for sneak attack, since it can only be used once per turn. That’s actually the point of Steady Aim - it’s a band-aid fix that insures that ranged rouges and single-stick rogues keep up with dual-wielding rogues’ DPR in games where the DM is stingier with opportunities to Hide in combat than the designers anticipated.
than the ranged rogue....so there is that. Now we all talk about how bows are OP in 5e, so I would respect hesitation in making ranged options stronger...but I personally don't think this one will break the bank.
It’s definitely not overpowered by any means, it actually fixes non-dual-weapon rogues being underpowered if the DM doesn’t consistently let them Hide on most turns of combat. My issue with it is that by removing the requirement to find cover or concealment and succeed at a Stealth check to get the advantage, this actually favors ranged rogues over dual-wielders slightly in terms of damage and removes the risk/reward proposition of playing a melee DW rogue over a ranged rogue.
 

Vael

Legend
All of them. Nothing here seems underpowered, and the additional stuff is pretty interesting. Any campaign I run going forward will assume Tasha material is fully available.

The one I probably won't use is the Sidekick rules, but that's primarily because I have large groups already, if I end up having another group that is on the smaller size, I'd definitely do it. I didn't play with the playtest rules, so I'm not sure how they've changed, but I'm definitely statting up a few Sidekicks for fun now.
 

iserith

Magic Wordsmith
Like any other rules, it will depend on what campaign I am running and whether the option supports the central theme or setting. If it does, I will include it. If it does not, I won't. My book arrives tomorrow so I will see what may apply to my upcoming island adventure hexcrawl campaign.
 

cbwjm

Legend
Almost everything except the ones where you can swap something out when you reach a level where you gain an ASI. Not because I disagree with it but because I don't think it's necessary to wait til that point if someone has an option that doesn't work out like they thought it would and wants to change something.
 




Dausuul

Legend
We’re already discussing this in the Steady Aim thread, but two attacks vs. one attack with advantage is the same number of chances for sneak attack, since it can only be used once per turn. That’s actually the point of Steady Aim - it’s a band-aid fix that insures that ranged rouges and single-stick rogues keep up with dual-wielding rogues’ DPR in games where the DM is stingier with opportunities to Hide in combat than the designers anticipated.
Steady Aim substantially narrows the gap between the archer and the dual wielder, but it does not eliminate it (in the scenario I tested with an 8th-level rogue, dual wielding got you 24 DPR while Steady Aim was 21.5 [Edit: This is incorrect. I made a mistake in the dual wielding calculation, it's actually 21.3, just about on par with Steady Aim, so my point may not be valid] absent any feats or other features). Furthermore, you sacrifice the ability to move. So I don't think melee rogues have to worry about being put in the shade.

I haven't read the whole thing carefully yet, but none of the variant features I've looked at so far seem ban-worthy. However, the artificer is another matter--not for balance reasons but for thematic ones. No, you do not get to play Iron Man in my campaign. Get off my lawn.
 
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Burnside

Space Jam Confirmed
Supporter
Thus far I don't see a strong reason to ban anything, but I can see some of the subclass changing options being a huge hassle. Like if you're a warlock and change your pact, that potentially affects a TON of stuff (your chosen invocations, etc). As a player, I probably wouldn't switch my subclass unless I was DEEPLY dissatisfied with my current one.

I'm pleased that spell versatility didn't make it in. That was the only thing in the UA that really rubbed me the wrong way.
 

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen (She/Her/Hers)
Steady Aim substantially narrows the gap between the archer and the dual wielder, but it does not eliminate it (in the scenario I tested with an 8th-level rogue, dual wielding got you 24 DPR while Steady Aim was 21.5, absent any feats or other features). Furthermore, you sacrifice the ability to move [edit: a dual wielder doesn't get Cunning Action either, my mistake]. So I don't think melee rogues have to worry about being put in the shade.
That is helpful to know. I think I still like the idea of these features being acquired in-game, either as Boons or through training. But it is good to know that Steady Aim is still slightly behind DW, at least at some levels.
 

Steady Aim exists to telegraph that the thing where halfling rogues were hiding behind the barbarian, jumping out, shooting with advantage, jumping back behind the barbarian, and then immediately hiding was actually intended gameplay. The fact that it also means you can get similar results without the metric truckload of sheer disbelief you have to suspend is just a side effect.

The ranger features to replace the null abilities that natural explorer and favored foe are make the book worth the purchase price on their own.

To be honest, there's very little in the book to dislike. I'm not a huge fan of cantrip versatility being once every 4 levels or wildfire druid losing fireball, but those are easy to remedy.
 


tetrasodium

Legend
Supporter
I haven't gone over them with a fine tooth comb but probably all but sidekicks & that's more because ime the UA ones felt problematic & I haven't looked at the tashas enough to really get a feel. everything else is stuff like patrons (used since rising & used similar even before)or feels like they didn't want to go too far too fast
 

Weiley31

Legend
I feel like with the Sidekick rules, you can use the Tasha's Sidekicks and the UA Sidekicks class progressions as representation of different versions in tier.

The Tasha's Spellcaster Sidekick statblock would represent a more novice no name joe. The Sidekick UA Spellcaster is somebody that studied under Gandalf/Elminster/Insert whatever higher tier variant which would be represented by its ability to reach up to 9th level spells.
 

Azzy

KMF DM
I really haven't had a chance to do a deep dive into the book, but I'm likely to use all the variant class features as well as the spells and feats (except guuner, depending on campaign). I'll probably allow all the subclasses, but some may be disallowed depending on campaign theme and setting (but that's what I do with the previous subclasses, too). I'll likely allow the racial customizations, but I'm not sold on the custom lineage.

As far as the DM stuff, not sure if I'll get around to using the puzzles though I think they're neat in concept. Haven really looked at the parlaying with monsters yet. As long as I have as many player in my campaign as I do, I wont get any use out of the sidekicks.
 

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