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Take A Look At The DUNE Character Sheet!

Modiphius has shared the Dune: Adventures in the Imperium character sheet. The preview packages which come with pre-orders have been updated with these in PDF format (including a printer-friendly version).

dune_ch_1.jpg
 

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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey







Feepdake

Villager
Yes, this looks pretty narrative. Not my style.
2d20 games are not what most would consider narrative nor are they storygames. They incorporate some narrative elements in their mechanics, that's all.
 

ruemere

Explorer
Drives/Values? Skills? Assets? It looks almost like a Cortex game.
That's third game I see recently that follows similar approach to stats. Works nice (in my experience) as long as the players have an incentive not use the same combo for different tasks.
 

lyle.spade

Adventurer
I took part in the closed playtest and I am okay with saying that it's definitely on the narrative end of 2d20. Conan is crunchy; Star Trek Adventures less-so; Dune is farther along that continuum away from detailed crunch and toward descriptive narrative play. Whether you dig that or not is personal, obviously, but for what it's worth I think the rules modeled a vibe that felt right for Dune. And I am a fan of both Conan and Star Trek Adventures, in part because of how the core system has been modified to fit those IPs.

Otherwise, just watch this video and you'll be okay.

And what you might think of that Dune movie is immaterial here; Iron Maiden makes everything wonderful.
 

MGibster

Legend
The title of this thread reminds me of a kid excitedly looking forward to a Christmas present and that makes me happy. It's nice to see some enthusiasm.
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
I took part in the closed playtest and I am okay with saying that it's definitely on the narrative end of 2d20. Conan is crunchy; Star Trek Adventures less-so; Dune is farther along that continuum away from detailed crunch and toward descriptive narrative play. Whether you dig that or not is personal, obviously, but for what it's worth I think the rules modeled a vibe that felt right for Dune. And I am a fan of both Conan and Star Trek Adventures, in part because of how the core system has been modified to fit those IPs.

Otherwise, just watch this video and you'll be okay.

And what you might think of that Dune movie is immaterial here; Iron Maiden makes everything wonderful.
The project lead is Andy Peregrine, so that’s a given. Definitely his type of game!
 

CubicsRube

Adventurer
Supporter
I wouldn't call dune a particularly curnchy sci fi, so a more narrative style fits the theme.

It definately needs rules on how to provoke your guests into a fit of rage at a dinner party though.
 


Warpiglet-7

Adventurer
I took part in the closed playtest and I am okay with saying that it's definitely on the narrative end of 2d20. Conan is crunchy; Star Trek Adventures less-so; Dune is farther along that continuum away from detailed crunch and toward descriptive narrative play. Whether you dig that or not is personal, obviously, but for what it's worth I think the rules modeled a vibe that felt right for Dune. And I am a fan of both Conan and Star Trek Adventures, in part because of how the core system has been modified to fit those IPs.

Otherwise, just watch this video and you'll be okay.

And what you might think of that Dune movie is immaterial here; Iron Maiden makes everything wonderful.
It rocks. I rattle the windows of my car with Maiden
 


Drives/Values? Skills? Assets? It looks almost like a Cortex game.
Doesn't quite play like one, but it's closer than the other 2d20 games.
Note that tasks are a drive plus a skill. high drives get statements, and can only be used when the statement is matching the action, or when challenging the value (but then you turn it off for the rest of session)... Low drives can always be used.
Skills and foci work very much as they do in STA, except that only sufficiently high skills can have foci.

Traits are in the very generic mode, more akin to aspects in Fate than to Cortex conditions. Especially since they only have one allowed strength most of the time.

Someone was complaining (don't recall if it was here or on RPGG) the other day about how far STA was from Mutant Chronicles... well, this one is further still.
 

Shardstone

Adventurer
Publisher
What does the game do to prevent people from using the same combo every time? I'm kind of confused on this challenging the value, etc, idea.
 

ruemere

Explorer
What does the game do to prevent people from using the same combo every time? I'm kind of confused on this challenging the value, etc, idea.
Under CortexPrime and City of Mist rulesets, where descriptive traits are the core of the game, the outcome is narrated according to traits used.
For example, "Nasty, Brutish and Short" applied to a locked door is likely to be very physical about the task (kick it in, dynamic entry tool, etc) while "Arsene Lupin the III" will be discreet and employ refined tools. A GM is likely to prod a player gently with a potential penalty if they try to use a trait while avoiding potential consequences of the interpretation.

NOTE: This should be also possible if the Dune resembles Dishonored (Dishonored: The Roleplaying Game) Styles.
 

Corone

Explorer
...but does Andy like Maiden? That's a good litmus test for a good game designer.
Lol, not so much I’m afraid!
But I should add that while I am the project manager and take far too many oppotunities to influence the creative aspects, our lead designer is still Nathan Dowdell who is the master of all things 2d20. :)

If people want to know more about how Dune works, there is an 80 page playable preview pdf free with each Corebook preorder. So you can take a look right now. We’re also chatting in blog posts on the Modiphius site and their forum.
As I’m an EN guy too I’m happy to answer questions here as well. :)
 

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