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Star Wars The mandalorian [Spoilers]


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doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
Interview with Star Wars RPG writer Bill Slavicsek about The Mandalorian:

Bill's work definitely defined post OT Star Wars, for me.

The broader Galaxy is all Tapani nobles (and saber rakes), sky slicers and swoop bikes, Red Shift Limit on the data stick, running from Imperial Inquisitors in my YT-1930, Corellian Whiskey, etc.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
Bill's work definitely defined post OT Star Wars, for me.

The broader Galaxy is all Tapani nobles (and saber rakes), sky slicers and swoop bikes, Red Shift Limit on the data stick, running from Imperial Inquisitors in my YT-1930, Corellian Whiskey, etc.

YT 1930 why not the 2000 or 2400?
 


FitzTheRuke

Legend
Why does everyone assume that Grogu will get aged up? He's not Groot. He's already fifty years old. Ten, twenty years later, he should be mostly unchanged. Maybe he'll start talking, sure, but that's about it. I don't think there's a way for him to be aged to a teenager without Mando being an old man.
 


On the topic of illusion of depth, this is one of the reasons when I write a D&D campaign, that I write a lot more backstory than the players will ever explore. It creates a feeling that all the individual elements are part of a greater whole, but there are purposefully puzzle pieces missing. It is a puzzle that the players can try and put together in their head, although it is not meant to be solved.

Many of those background elements are just window dressing; never meant to be stories of their own. In that respect, I feel exploring the clone wars and Vaders backstory was a mistake. It is not as interesting to show the audience what happened, rather than leaving it to the audience to fill in the blanks. Vader was written as a villain, and never meant to be a protagonist. So you have to jump through a lot of hoops to make him one.

Likewise, showing the Spice Mines of Kessel in Solo feels creatively bankrupt. I enjoyed the film, while a lot of people seem to hate on it. But the way these spinoffs blow up George Lucas' table scraps into full blown stories, feels extremely uninspired to me.

The trilogy of The Hobbit movies had the same problem. Peter Jackson tried to transform a simple book into a fullblown epic trilogy, by filling it with left overs from the Silmarillion: details that were never meant to be full blown stories of their own. Transforming the window dressing into the foreground of a grand adventure, means taking away some of that mystery, and the feeling of depth. Sure, he's filling in the missing pieces and creating actual depth. But what is inserted is not necessarily better than what we had in our heads. And some puzzles are intended to remain unsolved. I did not need to see the clone wars, or the spice mines of Kessel, or the battle of the 5 armies.
 
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Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
Why does everyone assume that Grogu will get aged up? He's not Groot. He's already fifty years old. Ten, twenty years later, he should be mostly unchanged. Maybe he'll start talking, sure, but that's about it. I don't think there's a way for him to be aged to a teenager without Mando being an old man.
Assuming that species ages the same way that humans do.
 

FitzTheRuke

Legend
Assuming that species ages the same way that humans do.
Sure, I guess they could have him say "Growth slow may be but fast, puberty is, for my species."

But personally I think that would be a lame excuse to pull a Groot. A little too plot-based convenient for my taste. I guess if they make him awesome enough, I would shrug it off, though!
 

FitzTheRuke

Legend
On the topic of illusion of depth, this is one of the reasons when I write a D&D campaign, that I write a lot more backstory than the players will ever explore. It creates a feeling that all the individual elements are part of a greater whole, but there are purposefully puzzle pieces missing. It is a puzzle that the players can try and put together in their head, although it is not meant to be solved.

Many of those background elements are just window dressing; never meant to be stories of their own. In that respect, I feel exploring the clone wars and Vaders backstory was a mistake. It is not as interesting to show the audience what happened, rather than leaving it to the audience to fill in the blanks. Vader was written as a villain, and never meant to be a protagonist. So you have to jump through a lot of hoops to make him one.

Likewise, showing the Spice Mines of Kessel in Solo feels creatively bankrupt. I enjoyed the film, while a lot of people seem to hate on it. But the way these spinoffs blow up George Lucas' table scraps into full blown stories, feels extremely uninspired to me.

The trilogy of The Hobbit movies had the same problem. Peter Jackson tried to transform a simple book into a fullblown epic trilogy, by filling it with left overs from the Silmarillion: details that were never meant to be full blown stories of their own. Transforming the window dressing into the foreground of a grand adventure, means taking away some of that mystery, and the feeling of depth. Sure, he's filling in the missing pieces and creating actual depth. But what is inserted is not necessarily better than what we had in our heads. And some puzzles are intended to remain unsolved. I did not need to see the clone wars, or the spice mines of Kessel, or the battle of the 5 armies.
Not only is it not always better than what we might have in our heads, but it also has the effect that it makes the world smaller. I found that the prequels (and again, in the sequels) took the galaxy-large setting and made it feel so much smaller. It's just the same stuff, over and over. The novels, comics, and cartoons (and now Mando) do a much better balancing act of mixing the familiar with the new to size it back up.
 

Marandahir

Crown-Forester
Sure, I guess they could have him say "Growth slow may be but fast, puberty is, for my species."

But personally I think that would be a lame excuse to pull a Groot. A little too plot-based convenient for my taste. I guess if they make him awesome enough, I would shrug it off, though!
It seems like a weird concept to have him age very slowly as a baby, then suddenly age very quickly comparatively as an adolescent and then age very slowly again as an adult.

We know that Yoda looks barely any younger when he was 700 years old in the High Republic Adventures IDW comics (launching next month). And we know that Grogu aged very slowly at 50 years old being still essentially an infant.

While Star Wars is weird, and I would be okay with Star Wars deciding that Yoda's species does a weird slow/fast/slow aging pattern, from everything we've seen, the species seems to just age SLOWLY in general. Weirdness for weirdness' sake is no longer weird, if you get my drift. You need an appropriate level of weird. If everything is weird nothing is. This is the mantra with development on Tamriel Rebuilt (the fan project to design, build, and quest mainland Morrowind within the TES III: Morrowind engine), and I wholeheartedly believe this mantra holds true for the weirdness in a Galaxy long, long ago and far, far, away, too.
 

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