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D&D General "The Women of Dragonlance" -- Larry Elmore's New Dragonlance Painting

Iconic D&D artist Larry Elmore has been working on a new Dragonlance painting. He has been sharing progress pictures over recent weeks. This is apparently a commission for a client, and is entitled "The Women of Dragonlance".

There's a new trilogy of Dragonlance novels coming from authors Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman featuring "classic Dragonlance" branding.

elmore_dl_2021.jpg
 

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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey

cbwjm

Hero
Is Tyler's work CGI or traditional? I realize he is of the generation that means it is in all likelihood done digitally, but I couldn't find out for sure.

Also, as am amateur artist (both traditional and digital) I can attest that digital work of the quality that Tyler is producing (assuming it is digital) takes as much skill as traditional art. The big difference is time, not skill, IMO.
Yeah, digital artwork still requires the same amount of skill, main difference is that you can more easily fix a mistake or experiment with colours.
 

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Blue Orange

Explorer
I'm more of an Erol Otus/Darlene Pekul/Dave Sutherland guy, but Elmore is clearly the master at this particular style of art.

But my first thought was: where's Takhisis?
 

dave2008

Legend
Yeah, digital artwork still requires the same amount of skill, main difference is that you can more easily fix a mistake or experiment with colours.
Well to be honest there are different types of digital artwork and some may require less skill. However, I was referring to digital painting and illustration which requires a similar level of skill.

Digital photo manipulation requires some different skills, but I don't know that I can qualify it as the same amount of skill as traditional or digital painting / illustration
 



teitan

Hero
It's CGI I'll always respect hand drawn over CGI.
It’s still hand drawn when painted on a computer and requires the same level of technical skill plus some including learning how to use photoshop and other software to produce the images. The only difference is they can go into greater and greater detail with computers using different zoom functions. I prefer hand work myself for those that can do the insanely detailed painting (hint, those are colored pencils over the acrylic to get the finer details) but I would never take away from digital artists by calling it CGI.
 

bulletmeat

Explorer
When looking at art for D&D I personally like the aesthetics of hand drawn art over computer art. Not to take anything away from Tyler Jacobson, I think that is a wonderful piece. But I think the old style of art like Caldwell or Elmore, with all the little imperfections that come through no having photoshop, give the game books a more old vibe since the fantasy tends to replicate an older technology level.
Looking at Tyler's painting I personally would see that as a sci-fi piece and feels it would be a great style for something along that genre. Even something like Dragonstar w/that art would be wonderful.
 

cbwjm

Hero
Well to be honest there are different types of digital artwork and some may require less skill. However, I was referring to digital painting and illustration which requires a similar level of skill.

Digital photo manipulation requires some different skills, but I don't know that I can qualify it as the same amount of skill as traditional or digital painting / illustration
True, I was thinking specifically of people who use digital products for painting, sketching, and the like. Photo manipulation is a different area with different skills which I wouldn't think would require as much skill as a painter or illustrator, they're totally different mediums.
 

NaturalZero

Adventurer
However, I was referring to digital painting and illustration which requires a similar level of skill.
The thing that folks that write-off digital media seem to not understand is that you cannot make these images without that same skill set as a traditional painter. All of the color decisions, composition, etc, is 100% the artist. The big upside of digital is that it's faster and cleaner but guys like Jacobson can still do oils:
1612832230747.png
 

Blue Orange

Explorer
When looking at art for D&D I personally like the aesthetics of hand drawn art over computer art. Not to take anything away from Tyler Jacobson, I think that is a wonderful piece. But I think the old style of art like Caldwell or Elmore, with all the little imperfections that come through no having photoshop, give the game books a more old vibe since the fantasy tends to replicate an older technology level.
Looking at Tyler's painting I personally would see that as a sci-fi piece and feels it would be a great style for something along that genre. Even something like Dragonstar w/that art would be wonderful.

It's an interesting point. CGI works thematically with sci-fi, but with fantasy archaism has its own value. A lot of indie products will use old woodcuts and the like, though some of that may be copyright issues...
 


Sacrosanct

Legend
The thing that folks that write-off digital media seem to not understand is that you cannot make these images without that same skill set as a traditional painter. All of the color decisions, composition, etc, is 100% the artist. The big upside of digital is that it's faster and cleaner but guys like Jacobson can still do oils:View attachment 132428
Exactly right. I do both (as a matter of fact, I literally just upgraded my iPad and got procreate just two days ago. No longer just a GAOMON plus photoshop guy lol)

And while I have nowhere near that skill, with digital art you absolutely still use the same lessons and methods as traditional painting. You just have layers and less paint splatter on your desk with digital lol
 

dave2008

Legend
..., with all the little imperfections that come through no having photoshop, give the game books a more old vibe since the fantasy tends to replicate an older technology level.
You still get imperfections with photoshop and the like. If you head over to deviantart you can see all levels of digital and traditional art. Many times it is really hard to tell which is which. Here is a nice little time lapse of a digital painting from an artist I follow on deviantart done in a painterly style: Persephone Time Lapse Please note this is not the same level of detail as Larry or Tyler
 

Her pose is a bit stiff, but I like his, and I love the background and setting and such.

Yes, left quite an impression on my young self as well... sigh.

My biggest complaint of art of the period (and still) is the scantly clad women and over sexualization of them. My female PCs are just as well covered and protected as their male counter-parts.
Elmore's DL series definitively has a pulp-fantasy thing going on, but that's something I now appreciate more than it bothers me.

Like how I made peace with pin-up gals art; from "ooh, sexy" to "ewh, objectification" to "ooh, art on body-seduction"
 



Lylandra

Adventurer
Am I the only one who is quite astonished by the merger of these character sketches with what looks like a very much polished background?
Especially as I am totally capable of producing the former and utterly unable of doing the latter.
(No, really, the poses remind me 100% of my Sailor Moon fanart back in the days)
 


Sacrosanct

Legend
That's why he's Larry Elmore. ;)

I'm sorry Keith Parkinson died...

Who do people think the Larry Elmores and Clyde Caldwells of today are?
That's hard because the stable of artists now is much larger than back then. We have the internet for ease of contact/hiring, and many more available artists now. So if you assume the context of "Has to be a D&D artist, and used includes some of the more iconic pieces", I'd say Tyler Jacobson, Jason Rainville, Magali Villeneuve, and John Stanko
 

bulletmeat

Explorer
I like alot of Wei Wang's material. Though that person has drawn a fair amount of Warcraft I think there are interesting ideas in poses & actions. Like a cartoony Brom.
I also love John Hodgson whose done work for the One Ring, Adventures in Middle-Earth, & the original Openquest book. I think those pieces keep the vibe of Parkinson & Caldwell.
 

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