5E To MC or not MC? That is the question!

Does your game allow multiclassing or not?

  • Multiclassing is a way of life.

    Votes: 4 3.4%
  • Most PCs are multiclassed.

    Votes: 4 3.4%
  • Maybe half the PCs pick up a second class or more.

    Votes: 15 12.7%
  • Sometimes a PC will multiclass.

    Votes: 46 39.0%
  • It is pretty rare for a PC to multiclass.

    Votes: 34 28.8%
  • We don't play with multiclassing (or no one does it anyway).

    Votes: 14 11.9%
  • Other. Please explain below.

    Votes: 1 0.8%

  • Total voters
    118
I don't see anything about the character you mentioned that couldn't be better handled by a class specifically designed to capture the character and playstyle you wanted.
Sure Homebrew is an option but not all table allow it.
I wanted the ability to buff an ally and allow them to make an attack, repositioning of the party when necessary, help action at range.
It also has enough utility with decent spell selection and skills.

Not something that's currently available without multiclassing
 

Helldritch

Adventurer
If you MC in my game, you never go back to your old class. This has slowed the MC madness by a lot, almost enough to make it non existant. In my two groups (12 players in total, 6 per group) only one is MC.
 

Wiseblood

Adventurer
Only a few players have decided to multiclass. One because there was no 5e subclass that did it when converting from 3.5e. One because he was converted from PF after a long hiatus. The third chose to multiclass because the class he was in didn’t have much going forward.

At levels 12-20 i didn’t notice if anyone was op.
 

Iry

Adventurer
So are you saying their is an optimum mediocre? How would I know if someone were do such? Maybe if they make the absolute median character? Or would we want to calculate the mean or some other statistical average? I don't know how I would even know...
The infamous optimized basketweaver is a great example. Essentially picking a character concept and then optimizing towards being effective at the concept. Even if that concept is strange.

"Having Fun" is a valid thing to min/max. :geek:
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Every game I'm in allows multiclassing.

In one, we have a bunch of people who are more for the play then the system. Use an app to create and level characters. They tend to stay single classed. We did have two people who multiclassed, one (also a fantastic player) who did so quite successfully, and one who's multiclasses cherry-picked nice abilities but didn't come together (in the level range we played) so they were quite far behind the straight-classed characters in the power curve.

Other groups have differing mixes of straight and multiclassed characters. I find that the players who are more likely to be careful enough not to shoot themselves in the foot with it (reasonable system familiarity) would rather have it even if they are planning a straight classed character, and the others don't care. No one is against it.
 

Azzy

Cyclone Ranger
Since we started playing 5e, multiclassing has been available but so far no one has done it. A couple players have talked about doing so, but never ended up doing so.
 

dnd4vr

Tactical Studies Rules - The Original Game Wizards
From the responses so far, I am thinking if I allow multiclassing, I would only ban dual-full-caster combos unless you do it from the beginning and keep them equal as you advance.

So, no sorcerer/warlock, no cleric/wizard, etc. unless at 2nd level you take the second class immediately. Then, if the two classes are ever more than 1 level apart, the lower class can no longer advance as the separation represents your decision to focus on the stronger class.

Other multiclass combinations, up to two classes only, and with any degree of difference in level, would be allowed as normal.

I am not sold on it, myself, just something I came up with this evening. What do people think about the idea?
 

Helldritch

Adventurer
From the responses so far, I am thinking if I allow multiclassing, I would only ban dual-full-caster combos unless you do it from the beginning and keep them equal as you advance.

So, no sorcerer/warlock, no cleric/wizard, etc. unless at 2nd level you take the second class immediately. Then, if the two classes are ever more than 1 level apart, the lower class can no longer advance as the separation represents your decision to focus on the stronger class.

Other multiclass combinations, up to two classes only, and with any degree of difference in level, would be allowed as normal.

I am not sold on it, myself, just something I came up with this evening. What do people think about the idea?
Not a bad idea. I do something different with multiclassing. It works out well at my table but your idea has some merit. You will however have the problem with palylock...
 

dnd4vr

Tactical Studies Rules - The Original Game Wizards
Not a bad idea. I do something different with multiclassing. It works out well at my table but your idea has some merit. You will however have the problem with palylock...
Thanks.

I am not as concerned with the paladin/cha-based abuse. We have a Paladin/Cleric in our current game, and yeah he smites a lot, but he also casts a fair amount as well.

My reasoning was mostly because the dual-casters we have seem to have so many spell options, knowing what all the spells do and choosing what to use takes too much time. The players simply aren't organized or experienced enough in most cases.

Also, I've noticed the loss of power associated with MCed caster compared to pure caster classes is more detrimental in the long run and I would like to discourage some of it without absolutely saying no.
 

jmartkdr2

Explorer
From the responses so far, I am thinking if I allow multiclassing, I would only ban dual-full-caster combos unless you do it from the beginning and keep them equal as you advance.

So, no sorcerer/warlock, no cleric/wizard, etc. unless at 2nd level you take the second class immediately. Then, if the two classes are ever more than 1 level apart, the lower class can no longer advance as the separation represents your decision to focus on the stronger class.

Other multiclass combinations, up to two classes only, and with any degree of difference in level, would be allowed as normal.

I am not sold on it, myself, just something I came up with this evening. What do people think about the idea?
Honesty I think even that's overthinking it, since dual-full caster is already generally one of the weakest multiclass combos in the game.

If you really feel the need to stop cheese, just make cantips scale to class levels and link the Charisma to attack part of Hex Warrior to Pact of the Blade instead (leave in the weapon and armor proficiencies at first level, though.) I don't even bother with that much myself, but I just trust my players to not be cheesy. (In their builds. The humor is Wisconsinite.)
 
Not a bad idea. I do something different with multiclassing. It works out well at my table but your idea has some merit. You will however have the problem with palylock...
Delaying Paladin abilities is a big deal. The palylock a different take on the class but it's not a straight upgrade over single classed paladin.
 

dnd4vr

Tactical Studies Rules - The Original Game Wizards
Honesty I think even that's overthinking it, since dual-full caster is already generally one of the weakest multiclass combos in the game.

If you really feel the need to stop cheese, just make cantips scale to class levels and link the Charisma to attack part of Hex Warrior to Pact of the Blade instead (leave in the weapon and armor proficiencies at first level, though.) I don't even bother with that much myself, but I just trust my players to not be cheesy. (In their builds. The humor is Wisconsinite.)
a bunch of cheesheads, huh? ;)

Actually, I don't mind the cantrips as it gives the casters a way to do damage on par (or close enough) to the non-casters. The dual-casters in our game are extremely effective, it just takes forever to get them do make a choice sometimes... very annoying.
 

jmartkdr2

Explorer
a bunch of cheesheads, huh? ;)

Actually, I don't mind the cantrips as it gives the casters a way to do damage on par (or close enough) to the non-casters. The dual-casters in our game are extremely effective, it just takes forever to get them do make a choice sometimes... very annoying.
Ah. Not the usual problem, that.

Not that analysis paralysis isn't a common problem, I just haven't seen it exacerbated by multiclassing. That sounds... painful.
 

dnd4vr

Tactical Studies Rules - The Original Game Wizards
Ah. Not the usual problem, that.

Not that analysis paralysis isn't a common problem, I just haven't seen it exacerbated by multiclassing. That sounds... painful.
IT IS!!!

;)

Seriously, though, you should see the time it takes for our Paladin/Cleric to pick his prepared spells when he has to! Utterly mind-numbing...
 

TwoSix

The hero you deserve
IT IS!!!

;)

Seriously, though, you should see the time it takes for our Paladin/Cleric to pick his prepared spells when he has to! Utterly mind-numbing...
I'm not sure how your suggested rule change (dual casters must be within one level of each other) actually fixes that problem. If anything, trying to ready two different prepared selections from two different spell lists seems like it would only exacerbate the problem.
 

CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing
If anybody's got them, I'd love to see some house rules for bringing back the "Favored Class" mechanic from 3rd Edition/Pathfinder. It was one of the more interesting racial traits back in the day.
 

dnd4vr

Tactical Studies Rules - The Original Game Wizards
I'm not sure how your suggested rule change (dual casters must be within one level of each other) actually fixes that problem. If anything, trying to ready two different prepared selections from two different spell lists seems like it would only exacerbate the problem.
Preparing multiple lists is what is already happening, and well, that part doesn't address that issue TBH.

My first thought was to simply not allow dual-caster MCs, but then I thought if they started that way (at least story-wise) it makes more sense. I generally don't like to not allow combinations players want, but I also don't see how (without a lot of time off/down time) a Wizard could pick up a level of Cleric, for instance.

Of course, the same could be true of most MC combinations. I was more a fan of dual-classing in earlier editions and I might do something like that now.

Still thinking it all over. :)
 

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