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Unusual Sandwiches

doctorbadwolf

Explorer
I recently made spaghetti for dinner at my parents' place, and used the sauce and meatballs for sandwiched the next day with my wife.

The sauce was made by puree-ing soup starter mix (chopped onion, green onion, cabbage, broccoli, carrot, celery, rosemary) along with the stems of the mushrooms I would add later (the caps are good chopped, the stems make great flavoring by aren't as good in terms of mouth feel), and olive oil. I heated up olive oil in my big pot, dumped in the puree once it was ready, and stirred until it got aromatic.

Before that, I'd gotten 2lbs ground beef, and 8 meatballs of ground pork with mozzarella. I lightly soaked both in low sodium soy sauce and red wine vinegar, then rolled the meatballs and mixed the group beef with a ground mix of salt, pepper (red, white, and black), oregano, sage, italian seasoning, and a pinch of my chili seasoning mix (curry spices with cayenne, mostly) for a hint of a kick. I let both meats rest covered on the counter in that mix for half an hour before starting anything else.

With the starter aromatic, I placed the meatballs in, covered the mix, and prepped my tomato paste (canned, I'm lazy about this part), and rinsed by olives and chopped my mushrooms (I rinsed those already. should have done the olives and chopped the mushroom caps then, but oh well). After about 5 minutes, I flipped the meatballs, and preheated the oven to 400. A few minutes more, and I put the meatballs in a pyrex, turned the oven down to 200, and put the meatballs in, covered with foil. They'd cooked enough to let out some of their flavor into the pot, but still needed a little more to finish. I thought about slow cooking them with the rest of the sauce, but I didn't want to risk them falling apart in the sauce, and I wanted that seared flavor and texure on the outside.

Next, I drop in the ground beef, and mix until it is fully mixed in with the veggies, and then cover while I made myself a drink*.

Drink done, I pour in a little filtered water, to keep the mix from burning, and a tiny bit more olive oil. The meat was leaner than I'd anticipated. Then, I start adding in the tomato paste and water, until I've got a thick, but liquid, sauce going, and add in the olives and mushrooms. They go last so the shrooms still have a nice texture when I serve it up. More of that seasoning mix I put on the meat, plus some extra oregano, soy sauce, and red wine vinegar. Not a lot of any of it.

Lastly, I take the meatballs out, pour some sauce over them, cover, turn the oven off, and put them back in to keep warm and finish. (I should have started at a lower oven heat, or turned the heat off sooner. THey came out a little hard to fork-cut, but still extremely delicious, and not enough to need a knife or anything, or lose any flavor.)

So, the next day, I've got the meatballs in the sauce overnight in the fridge, so I take them out and cut them into smaller pieces, add them back in, put the whole thing in a pyrex and reheat in the oven, and toast some hamburger buns first on a buttered pan and then in the oven to finish. I laid the sauce (which is very thick) like "sloppy joes" onto the buns, put a slice of havarti on each sandwich, closed it, let them sit covered with foil just long enough to get the cheese melty (a minute or so, because the buns and sauce were quite hot), and then served with a couple dry apple ciders.

*I had dry ginger ale (lightly artificially sweetened with stevia extract, which for me has no aftertaste), squeezed half a lemon and a whole orange, and then added a shot of my vanilla bourbon (it's literally bourbon infused with vanilla pods and coffee grounds, so...as mcuh coffee vanilla extract as actual bourbon, at this point, but I used less vanilla than you would to make proper vanilla extract, so it's still enjoyable as a drink). It's an odd combination on paper, but it sings beautifully in practice.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Moderator
Staff member
Sounds delish!

I’ve never made a true meatball sandwich. Heck...I can’t remember if I’ve EATEN a meatball sandwich! (I have always wondered why they didn’t simply flatten the li’l bastards out so they’d fit better. )

To the best of my recollection, the closest I’ve come was a meatloaf sandwich. Which, TBH, waaaaas killer.

Your bev sounded pretty good, too. “Fresh” springs to mind.

I’ve only rediscovered ginger ale in the past year. I don’t generally drink carbonated beverages anymore, but Mom does. And we’ve found unit to be a nice, slight departure from the more lemon & lemon-lime drinks she consumes/uses as tea mixers.
 
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Dannyalcatraz

Moderator
Staff member
Playing with leftovers tonight, I made a ribeye sandwich.

I didn’t have anything special on the bread front, so white it was...slathered with unsalted butter. Some leftover sautéed garlic spinach, sautéed white mushrooms & green onions, and a generous 4 slices of smoked Gouda were paired with the meat. The final toppings were a drizzle of A1 and some Guilden’s brown mustard.

Soooooo good.

(No pix this time- I got slightly distracted and slightly over toasted the bread. But it was so buttery it didn’t matter.)
 

Jeanne Marie

Villager
oooh, what a tasty thread!

white toast bread
pear
mustard
arugula
cheese

that's really delicious, I recommend!
 
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Samloyal23

Explorer
Nutella is pretty good, and that’s based on hazelnuts. Unfortunately for me, it is blended with chocolate, and I’m mildly allergic to chocolate. So I only eat chocolate I really love.

I’ve had almond butter. I’ve seen but not tried cashew butter. I haven’t bought it to try because of my experience with almond butter.

LET ME CLARIFY.

I really love peanut butter. In fact, it’s about the only way I eat peanuts by choice. But I like those “kiddie”, sweeter ones like Peter Pan and most of the store generics. In this, I am in 100% solidarity with my folks’ border collies. ;)

It isn’t just the sweetness, it’s also convenience. The “higher end” peanut butters all can have the oil separate out, requiring you to stir it back in. And because they’re preservative free, they must be refrigerated...and that makes the stirring that much more difficult.

I really liked almond butter when I have had it, and would eat it again if offered. But- to me- what I had did not taste appreciably different enough from those less-processed, less commercial peanut butters to justify the higher price. It was nutty (but not almondy) and salty, and you had that whole oil separating thing going on.
If someone could make a line of organic nut butters that did not need to be stirred, I would eat the :):):):) out of them. We also need to go for a wider variety. Why not have pistachio, macadamia, cashew, and walnut butters? Let's go for broke, butter ALL the nuts!
 

Dannyalcatraz

Moderator
Staff member
If someone could make a line of organic nut butters that did not need to be stirred, I would eat the :):):):) out of them. We also need to go for a wider variety. Why not have pistachio, macadamia, cashew, and walnut butters? Let's go for broke, butter ALL the nuts!
Seek, and ye shall find!
https://artisanaorganics.com/collections/pure-raw-nut-butters

And while I haven’t tried any of these, I have to say, it looks like they’ve taken MY lament to heart. As in, they’re trying to make their nut products taste like the nuts on the labels.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Moderator
Staff member
The latest tidbit:


That’s a salami & portobello mushroom cap sandwich on oatnut bread with mayo, brown mustard, provolone and spinach. Sides were Snyder’s Butter Snaps and some marinated onions.

Gustoso!
 

Dannyalcatraz

Moderator
Staff member
Shroom Sandwich var.#2:


Another oven-baked portobello cap, this time filled with Dietz & Watson Steakhouse Onion cheddar, some slices of Boar’s Head roast beef, mayo and mustard on a pretzel roll. The sandwich was assembled after zapping the cheese-topped cap in the microwave for 30sec. I should have added the beef, too. That was the only mistake. (Mis-steak?)

The end result was similar to a Philly cheesesteak, so definitely worth doing again in the future.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Moderator
Staff member
Tonight’s dinner was Shroom Sandwich 2.1. I did warm the beef this time, which was good. I also added a slice of Swiss, which was also good.

I also sprinkled some finely ground thyme on it, which was just OK.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Moderator
Staff member
Because it’s a Friday in Lent, Shroom Sandwich #2.2 was purely vegetarian. I doubled the onion cheddar, mayoed up the sliced pretzel roll, then added a smear- @2tsp of olive tapenade.

It was a lot better than I expected. In some ways, it was the best iteration of SS#2.


Still have 2 caps left...
 

Dannyalcatraz

Moderator
Staff member
Tonight’s experiment: smoked sausage, salami, Swiss and spinach on sourdough.

I predict there will be much...
[video=youtube;7WYHMUj2VLk]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7WYHMUj2VLk[/video]
 
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Dannyalcatraz

Moderator
Staff member
Mom came up with a new one for herself tonight: deli beef tongue with mayo and pickled artichoke hearts on toasted roasted clove garlic bread.

Even if I had wanted to taste it- which I assure you I didn’t- she probably wouldn’t have shared.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Moderator
Staff member
GXrgtxY.jpg

That’s something I whipped up following a trip to the Farmers’ Market and a local upscale grocery. That’s a bakery-fresh onion roll, topped with Black Forest ham, roasted chicken, Butterkäse, American cheese (the legit deli sliced original, not Kraft “cheese product” slices), radish sprouts, mayo, mustard and black pepper. It was very tasty, but I didn’t put enough of the radish sprouts on there for their slightly peppery flavor to come through.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Moderator
Staff member
Breakfast had an international...no, multinational feel to it: Black Forest ham, labneh and aji on warm garlic naan.

👍🏾
 

Dannyalcatraz

Moderator
Staff member
Tonight’s sandwich:
Rosemary & olive oil bread
Mayo
Slices of medium-rare ribeye steak
Pickled red onions
Smoked Gruyere cheese
Black pepper

As sides, I had some fried pita chips alternatingly topped garlic & basil spread (looked like guacamole) or three-layer dip (sheep feta, basil pesto, and diced tomatoes), all from a vendor at my local Farmers’ Market.
 
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Dannyalcatraz

Moderator
Staff member
Made chicken salad sandwiches for dinner tonight, using our local Kroger’s revised high end chicks salad. It’s a pretty decent commercial chicken salad, and it paired nicely with the mayo, fancy Dijon mustard and fresh-baked breads we used. Unlike many of the fancy chicken salads I’ve seen lately (which frequently added grapes and pecans), this was almost purely white chicken breast, mayo and seasonings, with just a hint of finely diced celery.

Results were good...and quickly eaten!

...but the REAL kicker was this pecan infused balsamic vinegar I picked up at the local Farmers’ Market:
https://texasoliveranch.com/product/balsamic-vinegar/pecan-infused-balsamic-vinegar/

I tasted a swig of it from a ramekin separately first, and it delivered an almost sweet & sour candy effect. When I drizzled this stuff on the sandwiches, the hint of sweetness took the edge off of the saltiness, and loosened up the chicken salad juuuuust a little bit more.

I really liked this vinegar. But I’m at a bit of a loss as his best to use it. It will definitely get drizzled on other sandwiches. And the site mentions using it as an ice cream topping.

But I rarely bring ice cream home. And this stuff won’t work on every sandwich. It probably wouldn’t make a good caprese, either.
 

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