What did you study in college?

Starting to get ever so slightly concerned about the number of librarians in one place at roughly the same time.

Michael Moore: 'I really didn't realize the librarians were, you know, such a dangerous group. . . . They are subversive. You think they're just sitting there at the desk, all quiet and everything. They're like plotting the revolution, man.'
I was shocked, SHOCKED I tell you when I realized how many librarian friends I have scattered around the country. They're EVERYWHERE.
 

log in or register to remove this ad

Mad_Jack

Adventurer
Tried college twice, never panned out.


Organized education and I have never really gotten along and, compounded by a bad school experience and my own mental health issues as a teenager, I was completely burnt out on it by the time I graduated high school.

I was one of those kids they used to label "bright but unmotivated" - I rarely paid attention in class, took few notes, barely did any of the reading, wrote reports the night before they were due and never studied for tests, but my high IQ allowed me to still absorb enough information even in the classes I hated to pass them anyway. I never failed a single class - even senior year I was still getting A's and B's in the classes I liked, and mostly getting C's and D's in the ones I didn't. And because I wasn't failing any classes no one noticed I was having problems developing good study habits... If I'd been one of the remedial kids I might have gotten help, but I slipped through the cracks in the educational system - my small-town school system just really didn't have the resources to deal with a smart kid who was bored out of his mind and having social and mental issues.
Despite my complete lack of study habits throughout my entire school career, I still managed to graduate high school 150th out of a class of 250...

My parents informed me senior year that they had no money to send me to college.
My grades weren't good enough, and my family not poor enough, to get any scholarship money other than a $50 scholarship for being left-handed. So I didn't bother looking into any colleges, and signed up to join the Army.

Funny story:

I'd just about aced the ASVAB, aside from a couple questions about engines, and the recruiter was sure I could get into whatever career track I wanted. Psychology had been one of my favorite subjects in high school, and I was looking to go into Psy Ops.
I was about four signatures away from becoming gub'ment property when the recruiter told me he'd call me back in about a week or so after he filed some paperwork. A few days passed after that week, and still no call. I called him a few times but never got any replies to my phone messages.

And that was when Iraq invaded Kuwait... Suddenly my parents somehow had money to send me to college. :rolleyes:

A high school friend had actually sent in an application for me to UCONN and I'd been accepted. So I spent three semesters at their Avery Point extension campus.
I majored in Psychology but between still dealing with my mental issues, my poor study habits, and the fact that the campus was located out on the water on the absolutely stunning grounds of an old 18th century manor house, I probably spent more time sitting out on the rocks writing poetry than I did attending classes. Even so, I managed to get into some 200's-level courses before just showing up to class wasn't enough for me to keep up my grades, and I was politely asked to get the hell off campus if I was going to keep wasting their time.

I worked full-time for about two years, and then during a period of unemployment my parents offered to pay for some college classes again. I went to a local community college as a Liberal Arts major. Between the classes my parents paid for and the couple semesters I paid for on my own, I managed to get about three quarters of the way to a Bachelor's degree before the money ran out again.

I'd love to go back and try again, but in the decades since those two tries at college most of the time I've been employed in jobs that don't do much more than pay my bills, and I've had a few stretches of long-term unemployment.
So I'm pretty sure that short of winning the lottery there's little chance of a third try.
 

Mad_Jack

Adventurer
Starting to get ever so slightly concerned about the number of librarians in one place at roughly the same time.

Michael Moore: 'I really didn't realize the librarians were, you know, such a dangerous group. . . .

Yes, they are... :geek:

1650315310359.png
 

Ryujin

Legend
Tried college twice, never panned out.


Organized education and I have never really gotten along and, compounded by a bad school experience and my own mental health issues as a teenager, I was completely burnt out on it by the time I graduated high school.

I was one of those kids they used to label "bright but unmotivated" - I rarely paid attention in class, took few notes, barely did any of the reading, wrote reports the night before they were due and never studied for tests, but my high IQ allowed me to still absorb enough information even in the classes I hated to pass them anyway. I never failed a single class - even senior year I was still getting A's and B's in the classes I liked, and mostly getting C's and D's in the ones I didn't. And because I wasn't failing any classes no one noticed I was having problems developing good study habits... If I'd been one of the remedial kids I might have gotten help, but I slipped through the cracks in the educational system - my small-town school system just really didn't have the resources to deal with a smart kid who was bored out of his mind and having social and mental issues.
Despite my complete lack of study habits throughout my entire school career, I still managed to graduate high school 150th out of a class of 250...

My parents informed me senior year that they had no money to send me to college.
My grades weren't good enough, and my family not poor enough, to get any scholarship money other than a $50 scholarship for being left-handed. So I didn't bother looking into any colleges, and signed up to join the Army.

Funny story:

I'd just about aced the ASVAB, aside from a couple questions about engines, and the recruiter was sure I could get into whatever career track I wanted. Psychology had been one of my favorite subjects in high school, and I was looking to go into Psy Ops.
I was about four signatures away from becoming gub'ment property when the recruiter told me he'd call me back in about a week or so after he filed some paperwork. A few days passed after that week, and still no call. I called him a few times but never got any replies to my phone messages.

And that was when Iraq invaded Kuwait... Suddenly my parents somehow had money to send me to college. :rolleyes:

A high school friend had actually sent in an application for me to UCONN and I'd been accepted. So I spent three semesters at their Avery Point extension campus.
I majored in Psychology but between still dealing with my mental issues, my poor study habits, and the fact that the campus was located out on the water on the absolutely stunning grounds of an old 18th century manor house, I probably spent more time sitting out on the rocks writing poetry than I did attending classes. Even so, I managed to get into some 200's-level courses before just showing up to class wasn't enough for me to keep up my grades, and I was politely asked to get the hell off campus if I was going to keep wasting their time.

I worked full-time for about two years, and then during a period of unemployment my parents offered to pay for some college classes again. I went to a local community college as a Liberal Arts major. Between the classes my parents paid for and the couple semesters I paid for on my own, I managed to get about three quarters of the way to a Bachelor's degree before the money ran out again.

I'd love to go back and try again, but in the decades since those two tries at college most of the time I've been employed in jobs that don't do much more than pay my bills, and I've had a few stretches of long-term unemployment.
So I'm pretty sure that short of winning the lottery there's little chance of a third try.
Both the greatest and worst gift I think that I had, as a student, was the ability to write more than just credible 5,000 word essays the night before they were due.
 
Last edited:

nedjer

Adventurer
Tried college twice, never panned out.


Organized education and I have never really gotten along and, compounded by a bad school experience and my own mental health issues as a teenager, I was completely burnt out on it by the time I graduated high school.

I was one of those kids they used to label "bright but unmotivated" - I rarely paid attention in class, took few notes, barely did any of the reading, wrote reports the night before they were due and never studied for tests, but my high IQ allowed me to still absorb enough information even in the classes I hated to pass them anyway. I never failed a single class - even senior year I was still getting A's and B's in the classes I liked, and mostly getting C's and D's in the ones I didn't. And because I wasn't failing any classes no one noticed I was having problems developing good study habits... If I'd been one of the remedial kids I might have gotten help, but I slipped through the cracks in the educational system - my small-town school system just really didn't have the resources to deal with a smart kid who was bored out of his mind and having social and mental issues.
Despite my complete lack of study habits throughout my entire school career, I still managed to graduate high school 150th out of a class of 250...

My parents informed me senior year that they had no money to send me to college.
My grades weren't good enough, and my family not poor enough, to get any scholarship money other than a $50 scholarship for being left-handed. So I didn't bother looking into any colleges, and signed up to join the Army.

Funny story:

I'd just about aced the ASVAB, aside from a couple questions about engines, and the recruiter was sure I could get into whatever career track I wanted. Psychology had been one of my favorite subjects in high school, and I was looking to go into Psy Ops.
I was about four signatures away from becoming gub'ment property when the recruiter told me he'd call me back in about a week or so after he filed some paperwork. A few days passed after that week, and still no call. I called him a few times but never got any replies to my phone messages.

And that was when Iraq invaded Kuwait... Suddenly my parents somehow had money to send me to college. :rolleyes:

A high school friend had actually sent in an application for me to UCONN and I'd been accepted. So I spent three semesters at their Avery Point extension campus.
I majored in Psychology but between still dealing with my mental issues, my poor study habits, and the fact that the campus was located out on the water on the absolutely stunning grounds of an old 18th century manor house, I probably spent more time sitting out on the rocks writing poetry than I did attending classes. Even so, I managed to get into some 200's-level courses before just showing up to class wasn't enough for me to keep up my grades, and I was politely asked to get the hell off campus if I was going to keep wasting their time.

I worked full-time for about two years, and then during a period of unemployment my parents offered to pay for some college classes again. I went to a local community college as a Liberal Arts major. Between the classes my parents paid for and the couple semesters I paid for on my own, I managed to get about three quarters of the way to a Bachelor's degree before the money ran out again.

I'd love to go back and try again, but in the decades since those two tries at college most of the time I've been employed in jobs that don't do much more than pay my bills, and I've had a few stretches of long-term unemployment.
So I'm pretty sure that short of winning the lottery there's little chance of a third try.
Not the only post where costs have affected outcomes. A long time ago I received maintenance grants and paid no fees, not least because at the time the costs of delivery concerned the costs of delivery, as compared to more recently when the fees fund property speculation, investments, private 'partnerships', executive administators, . . . and a bit of teaching. Hoping that you win the lottery :)
 

payn

Legend
Botht he greatest and worst gift I think that I had. as a student, was the ability to write more than just credible 5,000 word essays the night before they were due.
During a general political science course I had to write an eassay. Forgot all about it and was super drunk the night before. I hammered it out and turned it in the next day. Got it back a week later and wow it was full of grammar mistakes it was very embarrassing. Got an A- cause my thoughts were good :rolleyes:
 

Gradine

Final Form (they/them)
In undergrad I started as a History major with an emphasis in Social Studies Secondary Education, which I completed enough of to get into student teaching and realizing I in no way wanted to teach at a high school. Ended up with a B.A. in History & Theatre Arts (emphasis in Theatre History & Acting, respectively). Tacked on an M.A. in Theatre Production (emphasis dramatic writing), but it turns out that 2010 was a terrible time to graduate with an Masters in Theatre.

Just finishing up my second M.A. in Sociology, researching mental health crisis intervention. Been working at the nearby university since 2016.
 

Ryujin

Legend
During a general political science course I had to write an eassay. Forgot all about it and was super drunk the night before. I hammered it out and turned it in the next day. Got it back a week later and wow it was full of grammar mistakes it was very embarrassing. Got an A- cause my thoughts were good :rolleyes:
The teachers liked my vocabulary. In grade 5 I tested at a grade 9 level. Big words meant big grades ;)
 





Parmandur

Book-Friend
Sort of, yeah. It's mostly between Bertrand Russell and Edmund Husserl for me.

You?
Husserl is probably the most important philosopher since Heigl. Way more interesting and practical than Heigl, too.

Kind of an odd duck pairing, in a lot of ways, Russell and Husserl.

I'm not a Thomist by a long shot, but Aquinas is probably still one of my favorite philosphers to read to get a full interesting of an issue. Better to read in Latin, and requires some grounding in the Scholastic method of dialectic, but very fruitful even when he's wrong (which is not infrequently).
 




South by Southwest

Incorrigible Daydreamer
Husserl is probably the most important philosopher since Heigl. Way more interesting and practical than Heigl, too.
He changed my whole philosophy of math and, with it, my understanding of the metaphysics of logic.
Kind of an odd duck pairing, in a lot of ways, Russell and Husserl.
I suppose so, but think of it this way a moment: Russell borrowed greatly from Frege, right? And Frege and Husserl were not nearly so far from each other. Never mind the hardcore empiricism Russell is (rightly) famous for; just think of the method of philosophical analysis he used. That has Frege written all over it.
I'm not a Thomist by a long shot, but Aquinas is probably still one of my favorite philosphers to read to get a full interesting of an issue. Better to read in Latin, and requires some grounding in the Scholastic method of dialectic, but very fruitful even when he's wrong (which is not infrequently).
Aquinas is one of the great minds of all human history, and I say this as a man who also is not a Thomist. He truly was one of the all-time geniuses in human history. Even where I disagree with him, I cannot help but admire him and love the clarity and comprehensiveness of his mind.
 
Last edited:


Ryujin

Legend
In grade school, when we got in trouble we had to stay in from recess after lunch and copy pages out of the dictionary.

Between third grade and sixth grade, I'd read and copied Webster's 3rd Ed. Collegiate Dictionary cover-to-cover. :geek:
My 6th grade teacher would send me off to one of the library resource rooms with page numbers from the dictionary from which I was to define words, using my own terms. It wasn't as punishment; he was allowing me to work beyond the rest of the class. The results made him remark that I was the "most succinct" student he had ever taught which, rather ironically, I had to look up in the dictionary :ROFLMAO:
 


Level Up!

An Advertisement

Advertisement4

Top