What did you study in college?

Bachelor of Business Administration with a concentration in accounting (the equivalent of a 'major'), and while there were no 'minors' did a lot of economics as part of it. Also took as many linguistics courses as I could with the credit hours I didn't have to devote to business courses, for personal interest.

Since I'm a CPA, the degree was certainly useful career-wise. In fact an undergraduate degree was required to begin the (at the time) CA program. Business and commerce degrees are of course the most common, but I've worked with CPAs with degrees in math, chemistry, biology, and a number of other subjects.
 

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ART!

Legend
Does being in the military count? I'm going to say it counts. Did that, and then on to college: film-making, and then switched to fine arts (drawing). I worked in and out of the comic book biz (co-writing, penciling, coloring, retail) for about 20 years. Now I work in printing, so not really putting any of that to use, per se.
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Okay, it was quite some time ago that I went to university. I majored in CIS, which was Computer and Information Science - a slight twist on the usual CS degree. It also had very little room in terms of free credits, so as a intellectual challenge I looked at what could I fit in for a minor without taking any additional classes, and it was HR. Which ended up being a bunch of management classes that actually have stood me in good stead.
 

Smackpixi

Adventurer
University of Minnesota, Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature. I was also like half a class shy of a minor in women’s studies, it’s been 20 years, I forget why I didn’t bother with that, think there was some additional bs to the minor I didn’t want to do, also didn’t really care about the field, just liked the classes. Which is how I ended up with the major as well. Just liked the classes so kept taking them and after three years added up what I’d been taking classes in, and discovered what my major was going to be. Senior thesis was on Mad Max trilogy.

Edit, I enjoyed it. I had the privilege of going to school casually, rather than say for a purpose and having to pay for it. Huge school, like third to Ohio State and Texas for undergrad population, but, as I said, I just took classes I wanted to so outside a couple obligatory credits needed, most of classes were under 20 people. I met some girls at fancy east coast schools online and visited them and sat in on some classes there, and, wow, was an order of magnitude better (Dartmouth, Cornell, Sarah Laurence) instruction, student engagement, and just everything. Those schools cost eye blindingly more than my state school, but just hungover crashing a handful of classes, was really impressed, and jealous.
 
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briggart

Explorer
I took the equivalent (I think) of master degree in physics, and then went on to get a PhD in physics, cosmology specifically. I definitely enjoyed university, both the subjects and the experience, even though I think it was very different from the US system. I'm still in academia, but I gradually focused more and more on data analysis, so my day job actually has more to do with numerical methods, linear algebra and stats rather than actual physics.

If I had to go back to college, I'd probably focus on origin of life, or human evolution/archeology.
 

Took three tries to get through my undergrad, but that let me get a major in biology along with minors in anthropology, economics, and computer science. Grad school went better and got an MBA and a masters (plus ABD into the PhD program, never to be completed) in Health Services Research. Kinda strange that it landed my in Healthcare information resource governance, but that's careers for you.
 
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ART!

Legend
did you work on anything famous? The names certainly appropriate
I can't speak to "famous", but I did a lot of work for Wildstorm and DC, some Marvel, IDW, Archie, BOOM!, and a sprinkling of other things. I stopped coloring due to burn-out; too many all-nighters, just to make enough money to get by. I miss the work, but I don't miss the job - and even with that said, my favorite work I did wasn't even coloring, it was developing pitches with other creators; collaborative creativity is my absolute sweet-spot - which is one of the reasons I love ttrpgs so much.
 

Well, right out of highschool I jumped in with both feet into an engineering program. I helped tutor other students in calculus in exchange for their notes from lectures, during which I often worked on my D&D campaigns. After a particularly boring hydraulics class, I started questioning why I wanted to do it.

I've always been an artist with a gift for math - torn in two directions. Too much of a dreamer to pay attention in class, but good enough at tests to get by. I'm also terrible at doing what I'm told.

I've always had this theory that personalities intermediate between the sciences and arts are drawn to gaming--you get to tell stories and create characters, but also use math and design systems.
 

Undergrad: Political Science (which at my college was called Government) and Mathematics
Graduate: Political Science (MA), Library and Information Studies (MLS)
So, of course, I've worked in medical records/claims software for the last 25 years...
Naturally

__
It wasn't till I got too sick to keep up with schooling that I figured out what I wanted to do. Upon looking into it, it would have ended in massive debt since the program is only offered at a few colleges all back east. But when I did go to college, I started out with general studies with no degree in mind just taking the entry-level classes which in my case due to learning disabilities included what many of you would consider either high school or even middle school math.
 


payn

Legend
I started out wanting to go Philosophy major with intention of being a teacher. Though, my battery was burned out by the time I completed my two year AA.

After about 8 years, I finally went back. I looked at my options and Communication seemed like a real good fit based on my personality and career at that point. Got my B.A. in Org. Comm and my company paid for it.

Couple years ago I went back again and got a masters of science in technical communication. This time I went into technical writing, content management, and info architecture. Interesting to me and useful for my career. Company also paid for this go around.

I am now a project manager in the intelligent buildings field. I am hoping at some point to connect with my old professors and maybe get a part time gig teaching a comm class or two. Despite my career detour, I still have a strong desire to be a teacher. When I retire I think it would be something nice to keep doing in my twilight years and fulfill that desire I have had since I was just a young lad.
 

For Undergrad, I got a Bachelor's in Journalism. I had briefly and misguidedly been a poetry major before that.

For Graduate, I'm another Master's in Library and Information Science here. I just read a quote in Seanan McGuire's In Absent An Absent Dream that just about sums up why I went in for it when I couldn't make a living as a journalist and found myself in a dead-end data entry job:

"and when she grew up, she was going to be a librarian, because she couldn't imagine knowing there was a job that was all about books and not wanting to do it.”

But of course, now I work in IT and love it, so that's how that turned out. And as a result I have additional ITIL, Microsoft SharePoint, and Lean/Six Sigma certifications.
 

nedjer

Adventurer
I started out wanting to go Philosophy major with intention of being a teacher. Though, my battery was burned out by the time I completed my two year AA.

After about 8 years, I finally went back. I looked at my options and Communication seemed like a real good fit based on my personality and career at that point. Got my B.A. in Org. Comm and my company paid for it.

Couple years ago I went back again and got a masters of science in technical communication. This time I went into technical writing, content management, and info architecture. Interesting to me and useful for my career. Company also paid for this go around.

I am now a project manager in the intelligent buildings field. I am hoping at some point to connect with my old professors and maybe get a part time gig teaching a comm class or two. Despite my career detour, I still have a strong desire to be a teacher. When I retire I think it would be something nice to keep doing in my twilight years and fulfill that desire I have had since I was just a young lad.
I've been teaching for a few centuries now. Students are great, classes are fine, marking is hell - but there's always the summer holidays :)
 


nedjer

Adventurer
Starting to get ever so slightly concerned about the number of librarians in one place at roughly the same time.

Michael Moore: 'I really didn't realize the librarians were, you know, such a dangerous group. . . . They are subversive. You think they're just sitting there at the desk, all quiet and everything. They're like plotting the revolution, man.'
 


gamerprinter

Mapper/Publisher
I didn't actually finish college. I was only going for an A.A., so was just taking general education classes, though my interest was graphic design, and the school I went to didn't have much to offer in that field. Of the classes I'd taken, the ones I enjoyed the most were History of Western Civ 1, Art History 1, American Lit, English Lit and Philosophy, and was getting straight A's for the most part. While I enjoyed those classes, I didn't see a future in any of those specific fields, aside from becoming a teacher, which I have no interest in doing.

At everything I've done and accomplished in life, I'm self taught. I ran a graphic design/digital print studio for 22 years serving everyone from individuals to corporate and government. I've had a 15 year professional freelance illustration career, serving some of the biggest publishers, and now a publisher myself. I've done well without a degree, but wouldn't recommend it as a career learning path to pursue - still, I've done alright.

I remember after completing the map commissions I did for Brady Games, Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare Strategy Guide, and after getting paid, they asked, "oh, by the way, what university did you attend?" I had to laugh at that. Unlike most, clients never look at my resume, rather at my portfolio and publications.
 
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I'm grading papers right now :-(
I'm avoiding grading to post this (during a plan period, no less. It's been a long Monday.)
BA in English, Teaching of Secondary Education (What do you do with...?), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2000.
MA in Teaching and Leadership (Without the Leadership endorsement. I was younger and dumber), St. Xavier University, Chicago, 2009.
MA in School Counseling (WITH the Licensed Professional Counselor endorsement. I am now older and less dumber), Lewis University, Romeoville, IL: wrapping up this summer.
 

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