What did you study in college?

South by Southwest

Incorrigible Daydreamer
How relevant is Sartre these days? Ever since reading "La Nausée" in French class, I've subscribed to his brand of Existentialism.
If you mean, "How popularly received is he?" I'll confess he's not en vogue these days, but there are those of us who still read and appreciate him.
 

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Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Undergrad: Trinity University (San Antonio)- Majored in Evonomics & Philosophy, with minors in Art/Art History, English, and Religion. Came up 3 classes short of earning 2 BAs…and I dropped 3 classes in my 4 years. The double BA would have been nice, but I dropped those classes for VERY good reasons and do not regret doing so.

Post-Grad: JD from UT Austin School of Law, MBA (Sports & Entertainment Marketing) from University of Dallas, certified in Mediation through UT Arlington.

…plus assorted other college-level classes I’ve taken just because. I think I took some kind of class every summer from 3rd grade until I graduated from law school. Some of that was to fill curriculum requirements, some for self-edification. And of course, I still have to take continuing education courses to maintain my license.
Forgot: there was a minor in English Literature as well.

That and the Art minor were arguably the most enjoyable classes I had. I mean, I spent most of my senior year working with pastels, acrylics, found objects, and unusual materials then eating burgers & fries at the campus grill. (Had a couple pieces up for inclusion in the school’s permanent collecti9n, but my experimental techniques were unstable, and they disintegrated.

But the English Lit classes were taught in a way that went beyond even my HS AP literature courses, and greatly expanded the way I read fiction.

Bonus: one course in particular- “Biblical Themes in Literature- cemented my über-nerd cred my freshman year. The course was about detecting and decoding the Biblical themes that western authors repeatedly used in their writing. One day, Dr. Hoffer read a few paragraphs from a work in which the author was implying that a particular character was evil by describing him in terms associated with notable infernal beings. He’d read a sentence, and ask which fiend was being alluded to. I- uncharacteristically- raised my hand and answered the first question correctly, all while looking down and scribbling notes. I did likewise with the second and third passages. By the time I did so for the 10th+ consecutive passage, he was calling me by name- I looked up and the entire class was staring at me.

Thanks, AD&D!
 
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BookTenTiger

He / Him
Forgot: there was a minor in English Literature as well.

That and the Art minor were arguably the most enjoyable classes I had. I mean, I spent most of my senior year working with pastels, acrylics, found objects, and unusual materials then eating burgers & fries at the campus grill. (Had a couple pieces up for inclusion in the school’s permanent collecti9n, but my experimental techniques were unstable, and they disintegrated.

But the English Lit classes were taught in a way that went beyond even my HS AP literature courses, and greatly expanded the way I read fiction.

Bonus: one course in particular- “Biblical Themes in Literature- cemented my über-nerd cred my freshman year. The course was about detecting and decoding the Biblical themes that western authors repeatedly used in their writing. One day, Dr. Hoffer read a few paragraphs from a work in which the author was implying that a particular character was evil by describing him in terms associated with notable infernal beings. He’d read a sentence, and ask which fiend was being alluded to. I- uncharacteristically- raised my hand and answered the first question correctly, all while looking down and scribbling notes. I did likewise with the second and third passages. By the time I did so for the 10th+ consecutive passage, he was calling me by name- I looked up and the entire class was staring at me.

Thanks, AD&D!
I loved, loved, loved the majority of my Literature classes! Some of the highlights:

Semiotics & Psychoanalysis literally changed the way I think about the world. I took it freshman year as my Lit 101 and from then on every single paper I wrote was a semiotic analysis. Anything can mean anything, man!

Soviet Literature introduced me to a lot of wonderful, creative writers. It was fun learning about the huge creative efforts that went into the creation of the Soviet Union. Then in our last class the professor outlined the fate of every single writer: mock trial and execution.

Magic in Post-Alexandrian Middle East was literally a class about magic during the time the bible was written. The class was held at 8:00 am and the professor took it very seriously. We read spells to summon bears, to trap demons... Cool stuff!

Muppets... Wasn't actually a literature class, but I did take a class on the history of the Muppets. I got to meet Gonzo.
 

I had a kind of meandering academic history; I have a BA in English and an AA in Library Science. But it is to be noted that I also have (and this wasn't really planned, it just worked out as easy to do because of the classes I'd wandered through) minors in Psychology, Anthropology and Communications.
 


freyar

Extradimensional Explorer
Undergrad: physics & math double major.
Grad school: physics (string theory)
8 years postdoc training: also particle physics and cosmology
I'm still doing all three physics subjects at different times, whenever I have enough time for research anyway (somebody mentioned it is grading season).
 

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Ath-kethin

Elder Thing
My first brief flirtation with college was right out of high school; I went for a theater major since I had no real plan but liked acting. That lasted about a year and a half before I dropped it, and dropped out, and proceeded to set fire to roughly the following decade.

In my late 20s I decided to delve into by love of architecture and the built world and started back up; I earned an AS in Civil Engineering from a local community college (their architecture program was under their Civil Engineering department at the time), and a BDS in Design Theory, History and Criticism/Historic Preservation from the school I transferred to afterward. My plans for proceeding to a Master of Architecture were derailed by the birth of my kid.

I am now an apprentice electrician working on security system design and installation, with a minor part-time gig as a TTRPG publisher. It's been rough to start over so many times, but I'm doing OK all around.
 

Mezuka

Hero
Electronics but I hated it after one year. All my friends went into computer programing. Changed to the Communication program as I wanted to make movies. Actually did pretty good as a cameraman, my handheld technic was very stable and creative, without a Steady-Cam.

Ultimately, when I sat down in front of a MacIntosh in 1987 and fired up QuarkXpress it changed my life. I became a self-taught graphic designer, for life.
 

Argyle King

Legend
My listed majors were "Communications/PR" and "Mediation." I took a lot of unrelated electives though.

I went to college later in life (in my 30s). I had the life experience and job proficiency already, but needed some piece of paper to be hired for much in the US. I enjoyed college, but I honestly don't believe that I learned much about my major during it. (In some cases, my opinion was that what was officially taught was wrong, but it's what I needed to know to pass exams).

Prior to college, I was in the military. I did multiple combat your tours. While that's not college, it was certainly educational.

Where those two things overlap is that I elected to take a lot of classes on warfare and strategy while in college. It was interesting to pair my practical experiences with some academic knowledge.

Edit: Other than that, I read a lot. I'm of the belief that education can (and often does) take place outside of the classroom.
 

Musing Mage

Pondering D&D stuff
I minored in a 90 minute bus ride to a 7:30 am class, where I majored in sleeping though said class, with extra credit in being groggy through other classes... until I had a 90+ minute bus ride to work at a Video Game retail store where I practiced the art of trying to get some homework done when there were no customers in the store. Usually getting home around 10 and thunking down to rinse and repeat.

The end result was a Journalism degree... The process I followed again a few years later to gain a certificate in Comedic Writing and Performance.

I regret all of it. Should have doubled down on my love of D&D and gotten into game design! :p
 



I did half a business degree majoring in public administration. Then I went to a degree where I majored film production and English lit. My final film project was on a local Shakespearean theatre troupe. (self-lol)

I worked in TV for about 15 years in Australia and the UK but it was mostly in technical roles rather than creative which was never my goal.

Nowadays I work at an archive migrating old media (VHS, etc) to computer.
 

Ulfgeir

Hero
I have a batchelor's degree in Informatics (Computer science). Only thing I am missing for being able to have taken out a Master's degree is a 10 credit thesis (1 credit per week of stydying at the time). The course-program also included some mathematics, and a total of 40 credits of Economics. We used to have 20 credits per semester for full course load (40 for a year).. Used to be that you needed 160 credits for a Masters'd sdegree. I have passed courses worth 325 credits... ;)

I have also studied project managment, business law + little bit of EU law, design, rethorics, and English.
 


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