Critical Role [+] What does Wildemount do that Forgotten Realms doesn't?

- I personally dislike most Ed Greenwood-style names (Jalantyr Mistgem, Sildar Hallwinter, Kelemvor Lyonsbane, etc.). If, like me, you feel these names are like nails on a chalkboard, then Wildemount is mercifully (mostly) free of them.

Interesting. Having basically been raised on the FR, this is practically a selling point for me, though I no longer run it. When we'd been playing there for like 3-4 years, we got to the point where we could just make up really "Realms-y" sounding names without even thinking about it.

And if I had to pick one thing it does better than FR, it's how so many of the various nations and city-states are at the edge of war with each other. If you're looking for large-scale conflicts, it'd be a better fit.

I do think the nigh-perpetual peace beyond "raids" and "spying" is a big part of what weakened the FR, and I notice no setting I've run since has been like that. Nations were often quite far from nations they were messing with, and always seemed to be using subterfuge and naughtiness rather than, y'know, sending an army or anything.
 

log in or register to remove this ad

Yeah, if you wanted international conflict, depending on the edition you were mostly stuck with fighting either Thay or Zhentil Keep.

I do think the nigh-perpetual peace beyond "raids" and "spying" is a big part of what weakened the FR, and I notice no setting I've run since has been like that. Nations were often quite far from nations they were messing with, and always seemed to be using subterfuge and naughtiness rather than, y'know, sending an army or anything.
 

gyor

Legend
This is the catch with campaign settings as content: you really only need a couple and any overlap in tone makes them less desirable.

Okay, what does the Wildemount have that the Realms doesn't?

First is the open war. The two big nations in the book are either on the verge of war or actively at war. There's no comparable war in the Realms, as there are no massive empires. And other WotC settings (like Eberron) tend to be set after war.

Most importantly, this war is not good versus evil. The Dwendalian Empire will SAY they're the good guys with their traditional fantasy races against the drow and monstrous races of Xhorhas who are spreading a magical darkness across the land.
But the drow are actually civilized, decent and just making a home for themselves and other traditionally subterranean races on the surface without being blinded. And they view the humans of the west as xenophobes who practice religious persecution and arrest those who don't follow their narrow list of prescribed gods.

There's other features. The continent is smaller and full of fewer nations and less real world analogues. Modern D&D races like goliaths, firbolgs, and kenku have a role in the world. There's a much smaller pantheon of gods. And the world is lower power and magic, so the PCs can be the big damn heroes and not overshadowed by an Elminster or Drizzt.

There are both active wars and massive empires in the Forgotten Realms.

Tymanther and Unther are at war for example, Shou Lung, Tu Lung, Wa, Mulhorand, Amn, and some others are massive empires.
 


jgsugden

Legend
The Realms is massive and at different times, different politican issues have been there - so you can do almost anything in it. However, I find it too much. Smaller worlds suit me better, so most of my settings have three or four heavily populated areas (the size of a FR Kingdom) and then a lot of ruined spaces with sprce populations.
 



Weiley31

Legend
Well for starters, it's gives Hexblades a much more legit Patron, in the form of The Arms of the Betrayers, that matches their fluff set up more than "Hey, let's mix in the Raven Queen Patron UA in fluff only with a Martial warlock" that the Hexblade got. And this is coming from somebody who loves both the Raven Queen Patron UA AND the Hexblade.

The Echo Knight is great if you wanted a Middle Earth: Shadow of War Ringwraith like opponent/character via Echo refluffing and the Hollow One Supernatural Gift.

If you wanted some Tharizdun monsters/Great Old Ones servants, then you have that covered via the Core Spawn monsters. There is also a neat Toad devil that you can probably use for a one shot villain and a sweet entry for Frost Giant Zombies. Which would be perfect for "Attack on Titan" style DND hijinxes.

It also offers rules for leveling up your weapons. If you wanted your character to use his dead sister's training blade instead of that shiny new shotgun or whip, you can keep up with that.

And then of course, if you didn't get the books they appeared in, it has a number of reprinted races like the Assimar, Tabaxi, and Tortles in the player options. Which for me is great as I don't own said books they appear in. The Tortle was DMguilds exclusive originally IIRC.

So even if you don't care or plan on running a Crit Roll campaign, it's VERY NICE for cherry picking stuff.
 
Last edited:

gyor

Legend
But none of that is on the Sword Coast, other than Amn.

Amn isn't concidered part of the Swordcoast even though it shares the same coast line, Amn is apart of the Lands of Intrigue, along with Tethyr and Calimshan.

And the question I was responding to did not specify the Swordcoast, it specified the Realms, your lucky because I could have pointed out the war between Lizardfolk and Aarokcora on islands inside of a massive gas giant (breathable) in Realmspace, or the plane sized Mindflayer empire on Glyph, or the Primordial Empire Shyr on Abeir, ect...

Instead I showed self restraint and kept it to Toril only.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
Amn isn't concidered part of the Swordcoast even though it shares the same coast line, Amn is apart of the Lands of Intrigue, along with Tethyr and Calimshan.

And the question I was responding to did not specify the Swordcoast, it specified the Realms, your lucky because I could have pointed out the war between Lizardfolk and Aarokcora on islands inside of a massive gas giant (breathable) in Realmspace, or the plane sized Mindflayer empire on Glyph, or the Primordial Empire Shyr on Abeir, ect...

Instead I showed self restraint and kept it to Toril only.

Yeah, but practically, the Sword Coast is what people usually mean.
 

gyor

Legend
The Realms is massive and at different times, different politican issues have been there - so you can do almost anything in it. However, I find it too much. Smaller worlds suit me better, so most of my settings have three or four heavily populated areas (the size of a FR Kingdom) and then a lot of ruined spaces with sprce populations.

The best way to deal with that if you want is to just focus on a region, like grab the Moonshae Isles book or the Border Kingdoms, and use those, most of the time you can just ignore what else is happening in the Forgotten Realms.
 



teitan

Legend
As a fan of Nentir Vale I think that Wildemount out PoLands the Vale. It's a classic style setting tinged with darkness. People comparing it to FR I am unsure if they have read an FR book or the Wildemount book but there are a lot of differences and more than just cosmetic. Maybe Tal'dorei as a FR like setting but Wildemount has its own identity. Many aspects seem more eastern European than the FR's Western European bent which is actually pretty significant as the East & West were markedly different. It has a pre-Renaissance feel, right on the cusp, with the Dwendalian Empire reminiscent of the Holy Roman Empire. The Kryn Dynasty also feels very unique, nothing really comparing to an Earth culture and the approach is very cool with the Beacons and reincarnation ideas. The Menagerie Coast is very Caribbean vs FR's Sea of Fallen Stars which seems more Mediterranean if I recall correctly. The approaches to races and cultures is fascinating as well. The Kryn Dynasty is ruled by Drow, sure sure but they aren't our typical Drow but they are and how they handled that is inspired.

What's really cool is that the integration of classic D&D tropes, like Vecna and the other GH deities from the Dawn War pantheon, isn't jacked. Mercer approaches it in a very organic way and the cults are handled in interesting ways as well with Warlock Patronage and Clerical domains.

All this adds up to it not feeling like a kitchen sink FR style D&D setting.
 



Coroc

Hero
...

- I personally dislike most Ed Greenwood-style names (Jalantyr Mistgem, Sildar Hallwinter, Kelemvor Lyonsbane, etc.). If, like me, you feel these names are like nails on a chalkboard, then Wildemount is mercifully (mostly) free of them.
...

No offense and in the end it is a bit of a matter of taste, but "Forgotten Realms / Faerun" sounds much better and poetic to me (non native English speaker) than "Wildemount"

"Wildemount" sounds like "Stormwind" /"Hawkeye" /"Stonehold" /"Bigriver" /"Greentree" etc. I hope you get what I mean, it just sounds like a (again no offense, it is the best way to describe it I do not know much about Wildemount and I do not want to downtalk it) 12 year old who is asked to name some fantasy riding animal.
 


Consider Cormyr. If it gets attacked it is by evil orcs, or devious Thayan plots. But if you compare it to real world history, countries that where big on knights existed in an almost perpetual state of low level warfare with neighbouring countries, because that is how knights generated their wealth. Where is the England to Cormyr's France?
 

Coroc

Hero
Consider Cormyr. If it gets attacked it is by evil orcs, or devious Thayan plots. But if you compare it to real world history, countries that where big on knights existed in an almost perpetual state of low level warfare with neighbouring countries, because that is how knights generated their wealth. Where is the England to Cormyr's France?
yea but there were no mages or clerics IRL, which easily compensate for your rivaling group of knight.

once more it shows that d&d ain't no simulation
 

An Advertisement

Advertisement4

Top