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D&D 5E What is canon about older-edition settings in 5E?

Faolyn

Hero
Taken separately, if we had just "Rhys" or if we had "Guildmaster Montgomery", I think your assertion that it's just looking for a term everyone understands, would be more plausible. But together, they form a picture of two deliberate choices, both of which point toward Faction War.
It's possible you're correct, of course, but I think there's been so much hate towards the Faction Wars for so many years I think it's questionable that they'll use that as their new canon. I can see them redesigning the factions for modern audiences, but not in the way that that adventure did.

There are other reasons why I think their choice of Rhys doesn't mean they're going for the FWs. First, Rhys is physically cool-looking, what with the hooves. Secondly, if they had just said "Rhys" then... who is this person? What does this person have to do with training people or finding recruits or being a patron? Third, while all of the factions center around a philosophy, the Ciphers are among the most physical. Showing a martial artist or acrobat falling doing (or failing to do) something makes for an evocative piece, whereas the Sensates... experience things with wonder. It would probably be a beautiful picture, but not one that may necessarily grab you or show anything different than a normal D&D picture--and it's hard to show how Montgomery sighing because a recruit failed to experience something.

And of course, fourth, they ignored nearly everything from the Ravenloft adventures, keeping only the bit about Azalin blowing himself up--and even then, they changed how that worked.

Obviously, we won't know until they release a Sigil-oriented book, but I think there's reason enough to think they'll go for the traditional factions, or something similar.
 

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GreyLord

Hero
I know people are falling back on sourcebooks of 5e...and trying to validate that, but right now...nothing really is canon from the older editions to 5e...except maybe that the name of the game is still called Dungeons and Dragons.

We could go with the basic...we still have 6 ability scores that are STR, DEX, CON, WIS, INT, CHA...

But they could retcon that right quick if they really wanted to (not that they would) and that would be that with the current policy...so...

I'd say the name...and that's about it.

That could be a good thing...or a bad thing...depending on your take.
 

Stormonu

Legend
Ghosts of Saltmarsh

Some information on the Kingdom of Furyondy and the Sea Princes, the Azure Sea and the battle of Jetsom
There is mention that "one of the possible locations of" Acerak's Tomb could be in the Hool Marshes
Iuz is mentioned as "a cambion and demigod", as well as the land of Iuz having ties to the Tieflings of Greyhawk
A reference to the Tower of Zenopus (the sample adventure from Holmes blue basic)
A lot of info about Scarlet Brotherhood
A sidebar on Procan, Greyhawk god of the sea
A series of books penned by Tenser and Nystul
sahaugin worship of Sekolah
A Tharizdun worshipper
 

Specifically, for in the VRGtR, there is a line which implies that Lord Soth's Domain of Dread, Sithicus, is destroyed. That does imply it had existed, but no longer does.
This is a misinterpretation of what "not canon" means. It doesn't mean "never happened". It means "might or might not have happened", It's Schrodinger's History, and most of the time the box remains firmly closed. In the event that the box is opened, e.g. a future Dragonlance book says "Soth never existed" (obviously unlikely), then VGR never mentioned Soth or Sithicus by name - so there must be some other explanation. The point is, new players don't need to read a bunch of old bunch of books and modules to understand VGR.
I mean, you may be right, and the 5E DMG really has a lot of signs of being written in an awful hurry (something not seen in a D&D core book post-1E, I'd say), but equally I think the general thinking about these settings at WotC probably still holds true. (Spelljammer and Planescape aren't mentioned because they're just listing "Known worlds of the Material Plane"). So whilst I accept they could change any of this, I very much doubt that they will change any of this.
You can say this about most of the stuff from earlier editions as well - it's unlikely to be explicitly changed because there is no reason to do so.
 


JEB

Hero
XANATHAR'S GUIDE TO EVERYTHING

Dragonlance
  • Reorx is associated with the Forge Domain
Greyhawk
  • Wee Jas is associated with the Grave Domain
  • Blackrazor is referenced under the Hexblade entry as a sentient magical weapon "carved from the stuff of shadow", tied to the Shadowfell (not explicitly tied to Greyhawk)
  • Pholtus, god of the sun, is referenced under one of the example rivals; he has "somber" worshipers
Nentir Vale
  • The Raven Queen is referenced under the Hexblade entry as the creator of the first shadow/Hexblade weapons (not explicitly tied to Nentir Vale)
MORDENKAINEN'S TOME OF FOES

Greyhawk
  • The book is ostensibly by the "Oeridian wizard Mordenkainen" and was shared by his student Qort
  • Shemeska's introduction mentions Bigby, Mordenkainen's apprentice whom he turned from evil; but she casts doubt on that
  • Qort's introduction mentions the Circle of Eight
  • Shemeshka and Qort both mention Mordenkainen's philosophy of "the Balance", which is elaborated on in the Blood War chapter
  • Iuz the Old is quoted in the section on demons; he mentions Doraaka, Greyhawk (the city), and the Amedio jungles
  • Rary is mentioned in Mordenkainen's sidebar on Demogorgon
  • Keptolo is mentioned as a primal elf/god and gets a profile in the drow deities section (not explicitly tied to Greyhawk)
  • Tarsellis is mentioned as a primal elf/god and again in the list of elf deities (not explicitly tied to Greyhawk)
  • Mordenkainen describes the elves of Oerth in a sidebar as "a sorry sort, abused by their past conquerors, often in hiding, and much divided."
  • The list of elf deities includes Gadhelyn and Ye'Cind (not explicitly tied to Greyhawk)
  • Mordenkainen has met Elminster, according to a sidebar at the end of the drow section
  • Vecna is described as a rival of the Raven Queen; Kas is mentioned in the same sidebar
  • The chapter on dwarves has a section on the dwarves of Greyhawk, to include specific details on Oerth's hill and mountain dwarves
  • The list of dwarf deities includes Muamman Duathal and Ulaa (not explicitly tied to Greyhawk)
  • The list of halfling deities includes Charmalaine, who also gets a full profile (not explicitly tied to Greyhawk)
  • The sidebar Halflings of the Multiverse describes the halflings of the Greyhawk setting, to include hairfeet, tallfellows (taller and more athletic with a resemblance to elves), and stouts
  • The list of gnome deities includes Nebelun, who also gets a full profile, and Bleredd (not explicitly tied to Greyhawk)
  • The astral dreadnought entry mentions Tharizdun, the Chained God, as their creator; Tharizdun is also listed as an Elder Evil
  • Fraz-Urb'luu is said to have been imprisoned for centuries within Castle Greyhawk on Oerth
  • The first skull lords are said to have appeared in the aftermath of Vecna's bid to conquer the world of Greyhawk; Vecna punished warlords of his that turned on one another by turning them into skull lords
  • Star spawn larva mages can arise from cultists of Kyuss; Kyuss is also listed among the Elder Evils (not explicitly tied to Greyhawk)
Planescape
  • The book was ostensibly delivered by Shesmeska the Marauder
  • The Lady of Pain is mentioned as possibly playing a "game" against the Raven Queen
  • Sigil's Great Bazaar is mentioned in the halfling section
  • Maruts (and "the Kolyarut") have a new origin tied to Sigil (thanks, @Quickleaf)
  • Steel predators are constructed by a rogue hexton modron at a shop in Sigil
Dragonlance
  • The section on Elves and Magic describes a mythal raised at Qualinost by the elves of Krynn
  • Mordenkainen describes the "dark" elves of Krynn in a sidebar, describes them as elves "whom others believe have betrayed their people"; he notes they don't have the physical appearance of drow, but wonders if that's permanent; he also notes Lolth and Corellon are unknown in Krynn
  • The chapter on dwarves has a section on the dwarves of Dragonlance, to include Kal-Thax, the Cataclysm, the Neidar, Thorbardin, the Dwarfgate Wars, the Hylar, the Theiwar, the Daergar, the Daewar, the Klar; it also has a specific section on the gully dwarves (aghar), which are "derided as stupid, smelly, and dirty" and "vermin" (no indication that there's anything to that beyond perception)
  • The sidebar Halflings of the Multiverse describes kender as the counterparts of halflings; they are described as having shorter life spans, pointed ears, and becoming "wizened" as they age; also as "great mimics and vocalists", "consummate storytellers", and very fast speakers (no mention is made of their views on property)
  • Tinker gnomes get a dedicated sidebar in the gnome section
Nentir Vale
  • The Raven Queen is detailed at length, with a new origin (not explicitly tied to Nentir Vale)
  • The new origins of nagpa and shadar-kai are tied to the Raven Queen (not explicitly tied to Nentir Vale)
  • Haemnathuun, the Blood Lord, is listed among Elder Evils (not explicitly tied to Nentir Vale)
Birthright
  • The section on dwarves has quotes from "Tenelar, Outcast of Five Peaks"; Five Peaks is a location in the Birthright setting; could be coincidence (and not explicitly tied to Birthright)
Spelljammer
  • Githyanki flying vessels are based on the illithid flying vessels, and powered by helms piloted by gishes (not explicitly tied to Spelljammer)
Dark Sun
  • The sidebar Halflings of the Multiverse describes the halflings of Athas as "feral creatures" that devour human and elf flesh; they live under chiefs and eke out an existence with "hunting, foraging, and raiding"; also described as "mistrusting, cynical, and often paranoid" due to their assumption that other races also devour other humanoids
 
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You can say this about most of the stuff from earlier editions as well - it's unlikely to be explicitly changed because there is no reason to do so.
I somewhat agree but also somewhat disagree. The difference with older editions is that they tended to believe they literally had a duty to maintain continuity and often included really bad decisions or lore-bits from the previous editions that should have been wiped away. I hate to grind the same axe, but one easy example if 4E's take on Sigil, which despite massive lore-changes about the basis of the D&D universe, inexplicably retained the specific status quo from the Faction War adventure - which both people who worked on the adventure have stated was not intended to continue - and acted like it had been that way for years. There are tons of more subtle examples too. Plus where the lore does change, they feel the need to explain it, often tediously and at length, which isn't actually helpful to anyone. The FR has been a particular victim of this.
 



JEB

Hero
TASHA'S CAULDRON OF EVERYTHING

Greyhawk
  • Book is ostensibly by Tasha; at Mordenkainen's request, the "Greyhawk Guild of Wizardry" got editorial oversight
  • Tasha ruled (where isn't specified) as the Witch Queen and became known as Iggwilv later in life; she also identified herself as Natasha the Dark and Hura of Ket
  • Tasha was raised by Baba Yaga and became an adventurer in the world of Greyhawk, a friend and sometimes enemy of other adventurers, including Mordenkainen; she had exploits with the "infamous Company of Seven"; she studied under "the original Mad Archmage, Zagig Yragerne"; she corresponded with "world-hopping (and sanctimonious) luminaries" like Mordenkainen; she is also familiar with the multiverse
  • Artificers in the world of Greyhawk have been inspired by the "strange technologies" of the Barrier Peaks
  • Tasha's sidebar for The Genie warlock notes that finding housing in Greyhawk is "rough"
  • Tasha's sidebar for the Aristocrat patron mentions the Bandit Kingdoms
  • The opening illustration for chapter 3 demonstrates her ties to Graz'zt (as also suggested by the variant cover)
  • Tasha's sidebar on Spells mentions Heward
  • The Traveling to Other Worlds sidebar notes that Oerth is in the Material Plane
  • Tasha's sidebar on Magic Items notes that Mordenkainen likes magic items
  • The entry on the Crook of Rao notes that it was created by Rao, and used against Iggwilv, who cursed it; the entry also notes that Rao lives in Mount Celestia
  • The entry on the Demonomicon of Iggwilv notes that it was originally based on the Tome of Zyx, and also connects it to Fraz-Urb'luu
  • The Mighty Servant of Leuk-o is connected to the Barrier Peaks and the Machine of Lum the Mad; the entry also notes that details can be found in the tome Mind of Metal, written by Lum the Mad's descendant Lum the Maestro; the tome also connects the Mighty Servant to the "lost" Olman people, and the entry later confirms that it was created in "forge-temples" by ancient Olman creators
  • The tenth of the Teeth of Dalhver-Nar, a "obsidian human molar", is linked to the tale "Legendry of Phantoms of Ghosts" (not explicitly tied to Greyhawk)
  • The fourteenth of the Teeth of Dalhver-Nar, a "broken translucent fang", is linked to the tale "The Claws of Dragotha" (not explicitly tied to Greyhawk)
Mystara
  • Artificers in Mystara are employed by nations to maintain "airships and other wondrous devices"
  • The fifth of the Teeth of Dalhver-Nar, an "emerald lizardfolk fang", is linked to the tale "Dooms of the Malpheggi" (not explicitly tied to Mystara or the Hollow World)
Planescape
  • The gnome artificer Vi (from Eberron) "runs a cosmos-spanning business that hires adventurers to fix problems that others deem unfixable" from Sigil
  • Guildmaster Rhys of Sigil (thanks @Quickleaf); the image also includes the symbol of the Transcendent Order (and Rhys basically looks the same as she did in 2E; as @Parmandur noted, she also still looks like a 2E tiefling)
Dragonlance
  • The Traveling to Other Worlds sidebar notes that Krynn is in the Material Plane
Spelljammer
  • The eighth of the Teeth of Dalhver-Nar, a "silver mind flayer tooth", is linked to the tale "Beyond the Rock of Bral" (not explicitly tied to Spelljammer)
  • Mind flayer nautiloids are illustrated in Chapter 4 (not explicitly tied to Spelljammer)
Zogonia
  • Tasha mentions in her sidebar for Circle of Spores that she found a "sapiens zuggtmata" in the depths of Mount Zogon (from the Dungeon comic strip of the same name, set in the same setting as Dragon's comic strip Zogonia) (not a published game setting; just thought it was a fun reference)
 
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Not gonna lie, this recent declaration made me mad; it's two-faced and disrespectful to the creators and writers who have worked for decades on the lore. Sure, there has been inconsistencies and retcons, but this is a bit much, imho. DMs have always been able to make it their own--heck, sometimes it was even easier in earlier editions, because they had more to draw from. If WotC doesn't want to be "beholden" to the lore of the settings, they should make a brand new setting. On other sites, people who are only familiar with 5e come on all the time asking lore questions, because 5e is a lore desert.
 

JEB

Hero
Not gonna lie, this recent declaration made me mad; it's two-faced and disrespectful to the creators and writers who have worked for decades on the lore. Sure, there has been inconsistencies and retcons, but this is a bit much, imho. DMs have always been able to make it their own--heck, sometimes it was even easier in earlier editions, because they had more to draw from. If WotC doesn't want to be "beholden" to the lore of the settings, they should make a brand new setting. On other sites, people who are only familiar with 5e come on all the time asking lore questions, because 5e is a lore desert.
While I sympathize, I think you want to direct such comments to this thread: D&D General - WotC: Novels & Non-5E Lore Are Officially Not Canon
 


JEB

Hero
PRINCES OF THE APOCALYPSE (thanks, @Parmandur)

Dark Sun
  • Athas is a "dying planet" "scarred by elemental power"; the gods of Athas fought a war against the primordials and lost; following the defeat of the gods, indifferent primordials took little interest in mortals while sorcerer-kings arose and nearly destroyed the world with "reckless use of defiling magic"; Athas became a desert world with terrible monsters and survival-of-the-fittest
  • In Dark Sun, "mere survival is adventure enough"
  • The main region described as suitable for this adventure is the Great Alluvial Sand Wastes, which includes:
    • the "slave village" of Freedom
    • Silver Spring oasis
  • The Green Age was a past era (presumably 5000 years ago) in which Athas looked much like the Forgotten Realms
  • Slave traders exist in the setting
  • Other locations in the setting include the halfling village of Ogo; the "recently freed" city of Tyr, whose leaders hope to forge an alliance with the halflings of the Forest Ridge
  • There's a very detailed section on elemental cults (and elemental priests) in Athas, they're very important in Athasian society; they note a difference between elemental priests and elemental cults, namely that the latter are evil
  • Athas includes city-states and nomadic tribes
  • Factions in Athas include the Veiled Alliance (=The Harpers), The Free (=Order of the Gauntlet), Druid circles (=The Emerald Enclave), Templar bureaucracy (=Lords' Alliance), and House Tsalaxa (=The Zhentarim); each gets a brief profile
  • Also mentioned is the Tyr Region, the Dragon's Bowl, the city of Urik, and Draj
  • There's an illustration of two warriors hanging from balloons attacking a single individual with two hand-axes - unclear if they're metal or stone (but definitely not obsidian)
Dragonlance
  • Mentions two eras in Krynn's history appropriate for the adventure: "the pre-Cataclysm Age of Might" and the War of the Lance
  • Locations include the hills and mountains of Solamnia; Ergoth; the "soon-to-be-destroyed Istar"
  • Notes the Dragonlance saga began in "Abanasinia, near Solace and Haven, at the end of the Time of Darkness in the year or two preceding the War of the Lance"
  • There are hills and mountains between Solace and Haven; Haven is the biggest city in the region
  • Gateway is a town south of Solace
  • the "forks of the White-Rage River" are presumably near Solace and Haven
  • Thorbardin has history predating the Kinslayer Wars
  • Prehistory: the god Chaos was imprisoned in the Graygem by Reorx
  • Pax Tharkas is north of Thorbardin
  • The Catalcysm "destroyed and buried countless cities, but also unearthed ancient ruins and places of power"; the "perceived absence" of the gods led humans to seek out sources of power that could "rival the divine"
  • Factions in Krynn include: the Knights of Solamnia (=Order of the Gauntlet), allies of the Forestmaster (=Emerald Enclave), community leaders in Abanasinia (=Lords' Alliance), and the Seekers (=Zhentarim); each gets a brief profile
  • There is no faction similar to the Harpers; "benevolent locals" are as close as you get
  • Also mentioned are Qualinesti elves; the Forestmaster, a powerful unicorn of the Darken Wood; the Straits of Schallsea; and the Theocrats; and Dragon Highlords
  • Draconians are corrupted offspring of good dragons; can be represented by applying the half-dragon template to hobgoblins or lizardfolk; each should have a Death Throes trait, baaz draconians turn to stone when killed while kapak draconians dissolve into acid
Greyhawk
  • References the Temple of Elemental Evil; located in the Kron Hills between Verbobonc and the elven kingdom of Celene; the Gnarley Forest is apparently nearby
  • The Temple of Elemental Evil "was built long ago and spawned hordes of bloodthirsty monsters" that attacked the lands between Celene and Veluna on "several occasions"; it (as of this adventure) is currently abandoned and has been for several generations
  • Hommlet, the "corrupt town" of Nulb, the "small" river Imeryds Run, the gnome town of Tulvar, the Etterboek, are all mentioned
  • Verbobonc is "the most important city anywhere in that area" and has river wharves
  • These are all in a corner of the Flanaess
  • Also mentioned are the Principality of Ulek, the city of Dyvers, and Chendl, capital of the kingdom of Furyondy
  • Factions in Oerth include: the Circle of Eight (=The Harpers), the Church of Saint Cuthbert (=Order of the Gauntlet), The Old Faith (=Emerald Enclave), the Knights of the Hart (=Lords' Alliance), and the Thieves' Guild of Greyhawk (=Zhentarim); each gets a brief profile
  • The Circle of Eight is interested in preserving the balance of power in the Flanaess (rather like Mordenkainen in Mordenkainen's Tome of Foes, though no tie is made)
  • The Church of Saint Cuthbert is one of several paladin orders (and also includes clerics and fighters)
  • The Old Faith includes the druids of the Flanaess; each region of the continent is led by a Great Druid; they are staunch enemies of Elemental Evil
  • The Gnarley Forest is home to the Gnarley Rangers, who work closely with druids
  • Knights of the Hart (a.k.a. Knights of the Order of the Hart) is made up of elf and human nobles and has branches in Furyondy, Veluna, and the Vesve Forest, and mainly opposes the "half-demon tyrant" Iuz
  • The gods Heironeous, Saint Cuthbert, and Tharizdun are mentioned; the Elder Elemental Eye is suggested to be an aspect of Tharizdun
 
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Considering how Ravenloft turned out, I think it's a mistake to think of the short paragraphs and sentences in the DMG, adventures and other books referencing older settings as "5e canon". Those are tips to DMs wanting to adapt previous edition content to 5e, nothing more, and they will be disregarded if WotC decides to publish any full setting books.
 

Voadam

Legend
Considering how Ravenloft turned out, I think it's a mistake to think of the short paragraphs and sentences in the DMG, adventures and other books referencing older settings as "5e canon". Those are tips to DMs wanting to adapt previous edition content to 5e, nothing more, and they will be disregarded if WotC decides to publish any full setting books.
What did the DMG say about Ravenloft that was contradicted by Van Richten's?
 

Athas is a "dying planet" "scarred by elemental power"; the gods of Athas fought a war against the primordials and lost; following the defeat of the gods, indifferent primordials took little interest in mortals while sorcerer-kings arose and nearly destroyed the world with "reckless use of defiling magic"; Athas became a desert world with terrible monsters and survival-of-the-fittest

I don't know much about Dark Sun, but by "the primordials" are they referencing the 4E primordials? Or did Dark Sun have references to some force killing-off the gods even before 4E?
 

JEB

Hero
I don't know much about Dark Sun, but by "the primordials" are they referencing the 4E primordials? Or did Dark Sun have references to some force killing-off the gods even before 4E?
I'm not a Dark Sun expert either, but that specific take on Dark Sun lore (primordials killed the gods) appears to originate from 4E Dark Sun.
 

JEB

Hero
TALES FROM THE YAWNING PORTAL

Greyhawk
  • A visitor to the Yawning Portal in the Forgotten Realms is described as a "bald, stern wizard clad in blue robes and speaking with a strange accent" and describing the events of White Plume Mountain; likely meant to be Mordenkainen (not explicitly tied to Greyhawk)
  • The Green Dragon Inn, in the Free City of Greyhawk, is described; it's been the starting point of many expeditions to Castle Greyhawk
  • The Free City of Greyhawk "stands at the nexus between a devil-haunted empire, a vast domain locked in the iron-tight grip of a demigod of evil, and a splintered, bickering host of kingdoms nominally committed to justice and weal."
  • "In the battered, weary world of Greyhawk, profit and power take precedence over heroics."
  • The Sunless Citadel, The Forge of Fury, and Against the Giants are all updated for this book, and were previously set in Greyhawk (the first two only implicitly, they can be seen as generic), but none are explicitly tied to the setting here (although, see below)
  • The sidebar on adapting The Sunless Citadel to other settings mentions the Baklunish, the Suel Imperium (which unleashed the Invoked Devastation), Bissel, and foothills west of Thornward
  • The sidebar on adapting The Forge of Fury to other settings mentions the Pomarj, the Drachensgrab Hills, and the Hateful Wars (which apparently involved orcs and evil humanoid invaders)
  • The sidebar on adapting The Hidden Shrine of Tamoachan to other settings notes the adventure was originally set in Greyhawk:
    • The Hidden Shrine was part of the "ancient ruined city of Tamoachan", previously the northernmost capital city of the Olman empire
    • The Olman civilization covered much of the southern continent, "centuries before current history began"
    • Tamoachan is located "in the savage lands south of the Olman Islands and southeast of the Holds of the Sea Princes
    • "The climate is subtropical and very damp; it rains nearly every afternoon."
  • White Plume Mountain is updated for the book, and the entire adventure (as well as the adventure location) appears to be canonically in Greyhawk, presumably including the wizard Keraptis and the locations on the map (the Great Swamp, Dragotha, Thingizzard, and Castle Mukos); White Plume Mountain is located in the northeastern Shield Lands, near the Bandit Kingdoms and the Great Rift
  • The sidebar on adapting Dead in Thay to other settings mentions Rary the Traitor, who wishes to increase his power and destroy the Scorpion Crown to restore (ancient) Sulm to a fertile state, subjugated the people of the Bright Desert, and betrayed the Circle of Eight, and made many other enemies
  • The sidebar on adapting Against the Giants to other settings mentions Geoff, Sterich, the Crystalmists, the Jotens, and the "infamous" Barrier Peaks
  • Tomb of Horrors is updated for the book, and the entire adventure (as well as the Tomb itself) appears to be canonically in Greyhawk, presumably including Acererak; as in the original adventure, the Tomb could be located in one of six places, including the Plains of Iuz, an island in the Nyr Dyv, the Bright Desert, the Duchy of Geoff, the Vast Swamp south of Sunndi, and an island beyond the realm of the Sea Barons
Dragonlance
  • The sidebar on adapting The Sunless Citadel to other settings mentions Xak Tsaroth, which was destroyed during the "cataclysm"; it also mentions gully dwarves
  • The sidebar on adapting The Forge of Fury to other settings mentions the Kharolis Mountains, Thorbardin, the Age of Might, the Age of Despair (to include Highlord Verminaard), and Theiwar dwarves
  • The sidebar on adapting The Hidden Shrine of Tamoachan to other settings mentions Chemosh, the Age of Dreams, and the Blood Sea of Istar
  • The sidebar on adapting White Plume Mountain to other settings mentions Neraka in the Khalkist Mountains, and the "armies of Takhisis"
  • The sidebar on adapting Dead in Thay to other settings mentions that the setting has "renegade wizards" of different colors; one (or more) Tower of High Sorcery; Fistandantilus, who made a failed attempt at godhood; the apparently ruined Tower of Istar, which Nuitari took at the end of the Chaos War, and which Mina raised, following which the black wizards took it over (this is the first reference to the post-War of the Lance era I've found in 5E)
  • The sidebar on adapting Against the Giants to other settings mentions Abanasinia, Qualinesti, Thorbardin, Kharolis, and Tarsis, which appear to be located near the Kharolis Mountains
  • The sidebar on adapting Tomb of Horrors to other settings mentions the Eastwall Mountains, the Cursed Lands of Newsea, and the Shadowglades of Krynn
 

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