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Review What is the most complex TTRPG of all time?

Rafael Martin

Adventurer
What is the most complex TTRPG of all time? I am thinking of a game that you would have to be a rocket scientist (or another occupation that needs an extensive education of many different areas of knowledge) to enjoy.
 

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dragoner

Dying in Chargen
At school, there was an aerospace engineer in our group, he went on to command an armorer's section for a flight of F 15 Strike Eagles; we played Traveller, Twilight 2000, and 2300 mostly For classic Traveller he made a spacecraft design and combat system which was the one of the best I saw, too bad I didn't copy it, and he lost it during a move.
 

Marc_C

Solitary Role Playing
  • Synnibar: "Rule Zero of every role-playing game is supposed to be either "The GM is always right" or "The rules shouldn't get in the way of the story", right? Not so in the World of Synnibarr! The GM is required to write his adventure notes down before the game begins, and then show them to the players after the adventure is over — and if the GM deviated from his written notes, the GM is required to award them bonus experience points. Worse still, the rulebook states that the GM "may not, however, deviate from the rules as they are written, for if he or she does and the players find out, then the adventure can be declared null, and the characters must be restored to their original condition, as they were before the game began." As such, rules-lawyering is openly encouraged in this game."

    Holy Cow!
 

Retreater

Legend
  • Synnibar: "Rule Zero of every role-playing game is supposed to be either "The GM is always right" or "The rules shouldn't get in the way of the story", right? Not so in the World of Synnibarr! The GM is required to write his adventure notes down before the game begins, and then show them to the players after the adventure is over — and if the GM deviated from his written notes, the GM is required to award them bonus experience points. Worse still, the rulebook states that the GM "may not, however, deviate from the rules as they are written, for if he or she does and the players find out, then the adventure can be declared null, and the characters must be restored to their original condition, as they were before the game began." As such, rules-lawyering is openly encouraged in this game."

    Holy Cow!
I'm intrigued. Please continue.
 



darjr

I crit!
 

darjr

I crit!
From the blog post linked to the wikipedia article about Pheonix Command. I don't say this often, my god!

My odds of putting the burst in the correct location are at 97%. I roll a 37. The burst is at the correct elevation, so I look up my minimum arc. It is .7, so the burst has spread over 1.4 yards. My rate of fire is *7, so I look up on another table the chance of hitting with a ROF of *7 and a MA of .7. The full-page table says I hit with 1 round. Now roll for the hit location. I roll a 292 and look up on the Side Hit table (I hit him in the side) and the bullet passes through the man's liver and stomach. Now I look up on one of the 64+ damage tables (yes, there's a specific table for a side hit to the hip socket) and find the one for a side hit to the stomach-liver.
 





Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
Phoenix Command, perhaps. According to Wikipedia "Phoenix Command is regularly held up as an example of the extreme end of RPG complexity."

Phoenix Command (and the simplified Living Steel) were the point when I finally realized that simulation couldn't be the holy grail.



I am thinking of a game that you would have to be a rocket scientist

The designer of Phoenix Command went to on to work for NASA's JPL. Does that count?
 

dragoner

Dying in Chargen
I think the most complex I ever played was Aftermath, which we emphasized the "After Math" and I am a engineer, so that math is my life, it was not doing it that was so bad, it was that it took too much time. Any "but realism" arguments are usually mooted by think about realistic healing: roll 2d12 for the months it takes to heal, and do saves against losing stat points ...
 

Fenris-77

Small God of the Dozens
  • Synnibar: "Rule Zero of every role-playing game is supposed to be either "The GM is always right" or "The rules shouldn't get in the way of the story", right? Not so in the World of Synnibarr! The GM is required to write his adventure notes down before the game begins, and then show them to the players after the adventure is over — and if the GM deviated from his written notes, the GM is required to award them bonus experience points. Worse still, the rulebook states that the GM "may not, however, deviate from the rules as they are written, for if he or she does and the players find out, then the adventure can be declared null, and the characters must be restored to their original condition, as they were before the game began." As such, rules-lawyering is openly encouraged in this game."

    Holy Cow!
Complex isn't the same as stupid. :D
 




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