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5E What is your current way to roll stats

Mavkatzer

Explorer
Awesome. What does BON mean?
Glad you like it!

"BON" is the net bonus granted by all the stats.

For example: 15 (+2) 15 (+2) 15 (+2) 8 (-1) 8 (-1) 8 (-1) gives a net bonus of 3
Whereas: 14 (+2) 12 (+1) 12 (+1) 12 (+1) 12 (+1) 12 (+1) gives a total bonus of 7 (the only one that gives BON 7, incidentaly)

My players seem to like to know the total bonus right away, when looking at the chart, so I added that column.
 

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Miladoon

First Post
Has anybody ever tried generating stats by just rolling a d8+7 six times?

Seems like that would be the most straightforward way to ensure truly random stats without getting outside the recommended 8-15 power band.
This is kinda like the FocusFoible method but without the focus, or the foible.

/scratches noggin
 

Not sure I understand—how would it create a wider variety of stats if it's impossible to go below 8 or above 15?
When you have more dice you are more likely to get the average number. So 3d6 is more likely to give a 10 or 11 than 1d20 does. When you plot the frequency of each possible result of a 3d6 system the numbers look like a bell curve. When you do the same thing for a single die system the numbers should be evenly possible.
 

Arial Black

Explorer
Does this method of generating ability scores have a name? Is it the Fraidy Cat Method?

:p
Heh. Yep, it's called The Fraidy Cat Method. :)

It's a cost/benefit thing. Potential gain = a couple of better bonuses. Potential loss = not being able to play that concept at all!

Like I said, if we knew we'd be rolling stats we'd be all for it and psychologically ready to create a concept after rolling and seeing what we got, and that's an enjoyable session in its own right. But we believed it'd be point buy only, so turned up with one or two definite concepts all statted out and ready to go (with a couple of tweaks), and so the threat of rolling so low that your concept is unplayable outweighs the promise of any sleight increase in bonuses from rolling well.
 


der_kluge

Adventurer
Interesting thread. My last PBEM campaign had folks just pull from a set of numbers - 15, 13, 12, 11, 10, 8, then add 8 points however you like (on a 1:1 basis), then apply racial modifiers.

So, if you really need two great scores, you can start with something like 18,18,12,11,10,8 - 77 total points, so it tends to be on the high side, though not extravagantly so.

Although, I'm thinking 13,12,11,10,9,8 is probably a more reasonable starting point. That would be 71 points.
 

Miladoon

First Post
Interesting thread. My last PBEM campaign had folks just pull from a set of numbers - 15, 13, 12, 11, 10, 8, then add 8 points however you like (on a 1:1 basis), then apply racial modifiers.

So, if you really need two great scores, you can start with something like 18,18,12,11,10,8 - 77 total points, so it tends to be on the high side, though not extravagantly so.

Although, I'm thinking 13,12,11,10,9,8 is probably a more reasonable starting point. That would be 71 points.
This seems solid. I am odd when it comes to point buy. I don't let my scores go below ten unless I roll them below ten. Using the second array I come up with 16,14,11,10,10,10, which is doable.
 

Mercule

Adventurer
Not sure I understand—how would it create a wider variety of stats if it's impossible to go below 8 or above 15?
The possible results aren't different (OK, they are, but that's not the objection). It's the odds of getting each that changes.

Your method changes the graph of the odds to a flat line that maps to "Y = .125" where X is bounded by 8 and 15.

The graph for 3d6 is a bell curve that peeks at 10.5 IIRC (equal odds of 10 and 11). I don't have the f(x), at the moment, but it's not trivial. The mean for 4d6 (again, IIRC) is around 12 or 12.5, with an even more complex function.

The point buy doesn't have probability, obviously, but the costs serve to keep the distribution normalize.
 

Megalith

First Post
Our method is roll 4D6, drop the lowest die. Place in order you want. Our group allows point buy, but no one's ever done it. My last rolled character stats, witnessed by my DM, are 18, 17, 17, 14, 13, 11. Using the human variant rule, this gives me -
Human Fighter
Str 18
Dex 18
Con 18
Wis 14
Int 11
Cha 13

Not bad for an off the cuff quick character role up.
 


Jim Williams

First Post
D&D DMG 3.5 Method 5: Organic Characters

My preference is for method 5, Organic Characters, from the D&D 3.5 DMG.

"Roll 4d6 six times, discarding the lowest die each time. Place in order...as rolled. Reroll any one ability score of your choice, taking the new roll if it's higher. Then switch any two ability scores. This method allows some choice but doesn't let a player have all her ability scores exactly where she wants them. A character might have to learn to cope with unwanted clumsiness (just as in real life), or she may have a personal talent that isn't usual for a member of her class (such as a high Strength score for a sorcerer)."
 



Miladoon

First Post
My preference is for method 5, Organic Characters, from the D&D 3.5 DMG.

"Roll 4d6 six times, discarding the lowest die each time. Place in order...as rolled. Reroll any one ability score of your choice, taking the new roll if it's higher. Then switch any two ability scores. This method allows some choice but doesn't let a player have all her ability scores exactly where she wants them. A character might have to learn to cope with unwanted clumsiness (just as in real life), or she may have a personal talent that isn't usual for a member of her class (such as a high Strength score for a sorcerer)."
A sound way to add variety to the randomness. By design, 5E has a place for unusual characters. A sorcerer with a high strength is doable.
 

Dit464

First Post
Our table came to the consensus that a person can roll a character's stats or your total points must equal 69 (standard array 15,15,15,8,8,8 or equivalent)
Example roll a D20 7 times and you can toss out one of the rolls (usually the lowest one you get) when I rolled my most recent character, a Human Variant Ranger I got 19,17,16,16,14,10 and the roll i threw out was a 9. So I got lucky and was able to have max Dex at lvl 1. Then again I have seen roll sets that have been 1,1,1,6,11,9,7 so this can be a double edged sword at times. In remarkably bad cases like this we tend to allow them to change their stat rolling method.

Even that being said our most recent game every character so far have rolled their stats and have gotten decent stats, the Goliath Fighter in the group was able to get an unnatural 20 for his Str stat, although the roll he threw out was a 4.
 
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manduck

Explorer
My group does 4d6, drop the lowest. Roll six times and assign as desired. You get one set of rolls. Then you can choose between what you rolled or the standard array. That way if you don't roll well, you have the array to fall back on. We were going to just use the standard array at first. Though suddenly most of the group wanted to roll stats. So we compromised. It worked out pretty well, over all.

I've toyed with the idea of each person at the table rolling 4d6, drop lowest, for one roll. Then taking six of those rolls from the group and making it the stat array for the entire group. Take the 6 highest if you have more than six or have someone roll extra if you don't have six players. That way everyone gets to roll and everyone ends up even with ability scores. If you want to really mix it up and have more than 6 people, take the three highest and the three lowest. It was just an idea to mix up character creation though. I haven't tried it yet to see what my group thinks. I also have an unusually large group. There can be nine of us at the table, if everyone can make it. So something like this could keep the entire group engaged at the same time and get them generating characters at a similar pace. Also lets me keep track of what's being rolled, in case anyone is tempted to cheat. If everyone at the group just starts making characters, I find I get pulled in different directions as the GM. I could be helping with stats for one player and then spells for another or answering race/class questions. If I can find a way to keep everyone on the same page at the same time, it makes things go more smoothly for me. We usually do a session 0 with character gen and introductions. I'm not sure if this would actually help keep things even and running smoothly though, as I haven't tested it yet.
 


werecorpse

Adventurer
Roll 2 sets and choose one.
3d6 in order, replace one dice result (lowest number) of each 3d6 roll (if less than 4) with a 4.
this results in a range of 6-18 but getting a 17 or 18 still needs to be rolled naturally.

if I was to allow rearrange I would let you do one direct swap.
 

One of the earlier editions (AD&D 2e?) had a method of starting with 8 in every score, rolling 7 6-sided dice, and adding the values of each die to ability scores. You didn't total the dice, however, you added each die result to one score.

For example, rolling 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 6.
You might go STR 8+6+2 = 16, DEX 8+2 = 10, CON 8+3+4=15, INT 8, WIS 8, CHA 8+3+1=12.

Has anyone tried this, or similar, in 5E?
 

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