D&D General What it means for a race to end up in the PHB, its has huge significance

Okay for races the PHB AD&D 1e introduced the traditional races that we think of as PHB races, the Human, Halfling, Dwarf, Elf, Half Elf, Gnome, and Half Orc. This provided those races a higher status over those only in supplemental books, more setting support, more of a presence in fiction and settings, etc...

When 4e added Tieflings and Dragonborn their visiblitty in settings and stories just exploded?

Do you think the same will happen to the new races to the PHB?

What do you think is the effect of a race getting added to the PHB?
 

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Clint_L

Legend
It's significant, as these species become the default choices. I don't think it's as dramatic in the era of DnDBeyond, where many players see whatever their DM has available - so mine have many dozens of choices.

Still, I expect to see more of the new core species. Goblins, orcs and goliaths were already fairly popular, as were aasimar, but this will really cement their place. But overall, I don't expect a profound impact or anything.
 

TiQuinn

Registered User
Okay for races the PHB AD&D 1e introduced the traditional races that we think of as PHB races, the Human, Halfling, Dwarf, Elf, Half Elf, Gnome, and Half Orc. This provided those races a higher status over those only in supplemental books, more setting support, more of a presence in fiction and settings, etc...

When 4e added Tieflings and Dragonborn their visiblitty in settings and stories just exploded?

Do you think the same will happen to the new races to the PHB?

What do you think is the effect of a race getting added to the PHB?
I think it has an effect because most DMs are willing to accept the PHB races by default. People will exclude races from all kinds of other books but rarely do they exclude the core races. So I think you automatically see an uptick as a result.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
It's significant, as these species become the default choices. I don't think it's as dramatic in the era of DnDBeyond, where many players see whatever their DM has available - so mine have many dozens of choices.

Still, I expect to see more of the new core species. Goblins, orcs and goliaths were already fairly popular, as were aasimar, but this will really cement their place. But overall, I don't expect a profound impact or anything.
Have we heard thar Govlins are on the PHB? That would make sense, since half the Settinf books printed Goblin, Orc and Goliath stats.
 

Most people assume the PHB races are available, they don't assume the same for any non-PHB race at first. So at least newer players and/or players joining new tables will tend to go for Core options initially. I do think people get over this pretty quick, but that first character can last a while.

So yeah, I think you'll see slightly more of the "promoted to core" races.

How big of an impact depends on how much new player growth we see. If there isn't a new major influx and just a steady stream, the effect might be muted and most people who've been playing more than a couple years seem to grasp that the core options are only the tip of the iceberg and most dms seem to allow most options except one or two person pet peeve things.
 

It's significant, as these species become the default choices. I don't think it's as dramatic in the era of DnDBeyond, where many players see whatever their DM has available - so mine have many dozens of choices.

Still, I expect to see more of the new core species. Goblins, orcs and goliaths were already fairly popular, as were aasimar, but this will really cement their place. But overall, I don't expect a profound impact or anything.

Even in the D&D Beyond era we see a huge gap in use between PHB races and supplemental races according to the provided data.
 


Mistwell

Crusty Old Meatwad (he/him)
I am very curious to see what happens with the half-elf, if the half-elf isn't in the PHB as that name as opposed to as an elven sub-species (or whatever they are calling it). It's an option with a very long history, was in Tolkien, in all the prior PHBs, is listed as a popular choice on DNDBeyond, and is a popular race in D&D video games like BG3. I am not sure how they change the name with that much force of popularity behind it.
 

There is a bit of a chicken and egg question: does being in the PHB make an option popular? Or does an option being popular merit inclusion in the PHB? Honestly probably both?
I have a book (somewhere) about the development of 4e and tieflings were included specifically because they were the most popular non-core race in 3e. (According to Rob Heinsoo) That's why they got promoted to premier league and probably why gnomes got relegated.

Dragonborn were a whole new option, though (although "play as a dragon or at least dragon-person" has been kicking around since... gosh, before I started playing, but dragonborn had all-new lore and stats and appearance and everything)
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
I am very curious to see what happens with the half-elf, if the half-elf isn't in the PHB as that name as opposed to as an elven sub-species (or whatever they are calling it). It's an option with a very long history, was in Tolkien, in all the prior PHBs, is listed as a popular choice on DNDBeyond, and is a popular race in D&D video games like BG3. I am not sure how they change the name with that much force of popularity behind it.
They had a bit about creating hybrid characters in the the Unearthed Arcana, and no indication that they don't plan something along those lines.
 

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