What's Your Favorite System for Star Wars

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
Although it's descended from PbtA, it's about as different as Call of Cthulhu is from its forefather D&D.
I dunno. When I played a session of Scum and Villany, and we started going over the rules it was, "Oh, hey, this is a PbtA game. Okay, that makes picking this up easy..."
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
It's the best system for a true Star Wars feel. SWD20, for example, is a good system, it just never actually feels like Star Wars. It slows down for combat and that is antithetical to SW.
Weird. Because I was always more satisfied with the speed of resolution in the d20 version than the d6.

I mean, when your D6 pilot wants to drop a force point, and has to gather a bazillion d6, roll them, and then count out the results... this is not tense or quick.
 

BronzeDragon

Explorer
Weird. Because I was always more satisfied with the speed of resolution in the d20 version than the d6.

I mean, when your D6 pilot wants to drop a force point, and has to gather a bazillion d6, roll them, and then count out the results... this is not tense or quick.
In more than 25 years of running WEG (and even playing a couple times) I've never encountered this issue.

I guess the guys I game(d) with were unusually good with addition. :D

Speed of resolution was not the issue that slowed down D20 games. It was all the tactical positioning and planning that was kinda sorta encouraged by the system. I never needed to run battle mats with WEG, and yet SWD20 essentially required it.
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
In more than 25 years of running WEG (and even playing a couple times) I've never encountered this issue.

I guess the guys I game(d) with were unusually good with addition. :D
Dude, with respect, reading one d20 is a heck of a lot faster than totalling up from 20plusD6. Our pilot has a lot of skill.

Speed of resolution was not the issue that slowed down D20 games. It was all the tactical positioning and planning that was kinda sorta encouraged by the system. I never needed to run battle mats with WEG, and yet SWD20 essentially required it.
Ah. We didn't find a need for battlemats for our d20 Star Wars. So, between the two system, actual speed of resolution became the controlling factor.
 

BronzeDragon

Explorer
Dude, with respect, reading one d20 is a heck of a lot faster than totalling up from 20plusD6. Our pilot has a lot of skill.
Well, with respect, if he can't add up those numbers in a few seconds, your pilot may have bigger problems. Not to mention the fact that those huge rolls are not at all the norm, unless you are at the very end of a long campaign and your characters have specs at 10-15d.

The only character I've played was a Coynite pilot, and I did occasionally roll a bunch of dice. It never slowed the game down at all.

In my experience, SWD20 incentivized players to come up with tactical positioning to take advantage of things like flanking opportunities, and so battlemats actually tended to be required. WEG combat always was more fluid in my tables. I only DMed one SWD20 campaign in all those years, and the group unanimously decided to go back to WEG.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
Dude, with respect, reading one d20 is a heck of a lot faster than totalling up from 20plusD6. Our pilot has a lot of skill.



Ah. We didn't find a need for battl upemats for our d20 Star Wars. So, between the two system, actual speed of resolution became the controlling factor.
I was really stingy with force points. Often that starting one is your only one.

There's also rules in D6 capping the D6s at 5D 6D is 5D+3, 7D becomes 5D+7. The d20 system is a lot quicker with the basic roll but you get heavy class, feat, powers on top of that.

. D6 does break down a bit with skilled characters but d20 also breaks down at higher level pick your poison. I like both usually go with d20 SWSE but we're looking at a few games of D6 over the holidays.
 

Jacob Lewis

The One with the Force
Speed of resolution is a feature? I guess that's true if the process of resolution itself is less interesting or engaging than the getting the actual results. Maybe that is why I find the narrative dice system (FFG) so much more appealing nowadays that it has greatly diminished my enthusiasm for the old binary resolution and numeric-based systems. With respect.

I can also see how someone who places greater value on the speed of resolution might also find a system like this to be less appealing without understanding how a more collaborative and thoughtful process for discovering a resolution is actually a major feature of the game itself. But that is the key difference between a story or narrative driven game and a skill level or combat driven one. As always, it's a matter of personal choice.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
Speed of resolution is a feature? I guess that's true if the process of resolution itself is less interesting or engaging than the getting the actual results. Maybe that is why I find the narrative dice system (FFG) so much more appealing nowadays that it has greatly diminished my enthusiasm for the old binary resolution and numeric-based systems. With respect.

I can also see how someone who places greater value on the speed of resolution might also find a system like this to be less appealing without understanding how a more collaborative and thoughtful process for discovering a resolution is actually a major feature of the game itself. But that is the key difference between a story or narrative driven game and a skill level or combat driven one. As always, it's a matter of personal choice.
I would try the new one out. The main reasons I haven't.

1. Gimmick dice.
2. Already have two Star Wars RPG.
 
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Gradine

Final Form
Thinking of trying to run a short series of one-shots as rules-light as possible. Anyone have any luck with Lasers & Feelings? I know the Sabers & Senate hack exists, but I think even that might be too crunchy for what I'm looking for
 

Jacob Lewis

The One with the Force
I would try the new one out. The main reasons I haven't.

1. Gimmick dice.
2. Already have two Starv Wars RPG.
Strange to me when I hear gamers drawing a line at dice. It's not a gimmick if they work, but to each their own. Shame I cannot invite you for a demo game. :)
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
Speed of resolution is a feature? I guess that's true if the process of resolution itself is less interesting or engaging than the getting the actual results. Maybe that is why I find the narrative dice system (FFG) so much more appealing nowadays that it has greatly diminished my enthusiasm for the old binary resolution and numeric-based systems. With respect.

I can also see how someone who places greater value on the speed of resolution might also find a system like this to be less appealing without understanding how a more collaborative and thoughtful process for discovering a resolution is actually a major feature of the game itself. But that is the key difference between a story or narrative driven game and a skill level or combat driven one. As always, it's a matter of personal choice.
Those of us who don’t like the FFG dice system understand its purpose, and why others like it. We just don’t enjoy the gameplay that it creates.

I don’t need the dice to decide what happens in the narrative, beyond success and failure. If there is going to be a drawback or mitigation on a success or failure, that’s a conversation between player and GM, usually a hard choice, or a “you can push trough to success, but there will be a consequence” sort of thing.

Likewise, I don’t want to spend time discussing mechanics during play. That is time spent with my mind on the system rather than on what’s happening in the imagined world.

All that being said I don’t find the difference between dice pools and single die resolution to be noticeable, much less problematic.
 

longisland

Explorer
Speed of resolution is a feature? I guess that's true if the process of resolution itself is less interesting or engaging than the getting the actual results. Maybe that is why I find the narrative dice system (FFG) so much more appealing nowadays that it has greatly diminished my enthusiasm for the old binary resolution and numeric-based systems. With respect.

I can also see how someone who places greater value on the speed of resolution might also find a system like this to be less appealing without understanding how a more collaborative and thoughtful process for discovering a resolution is actually a major feature of the game itself. But that is the key difference between a story or narrative driven game and a skill level or combat driven one. As always, it's a matter of personal choice.
FFG narrative dice system enables 18 different outcomes for one roll of the dice. It seems to me that it turns everything into a melodrama of complications. For when describing what the dice mean is more fun than deciding what you want your character to do.

Personally Critical Success, Success, Failure, Critical Failure strikes me as good enough variation of outcome. With the emphasis being getting on with story progressing the plot. Not simply the plot of doing a single action.
 

JeffB

Hero
I would try the new one out. The main reasons I haven't.

1. Gimmick dice.
2. Already have two Star Wars RPG.
I said the same thing a few years ago. I even posted a thread here that saw a lot of traffic and necro posts about why I should bother.

Finally buying the game and running it have just about been the most fun RPG experiences I have had in the past 10 years.
 
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Darth Solo

Explorer
Late entry: Uncharted Worlds.

It's a PbtA game that covers a wide base of sci-fi gaming. 'The Force' would fall under the 'Magic' rules easily.
 

Ancalagon

Dusty Dragon
Thinking of trying to run a short series of one-shots as rules-light as possible. Anyone have any luck with Lasers & Feelings? I know the Sabers & Senate hack exists, but I think even that might be too crunchy for what I'm looking for
A project of mine is to do a Star Wars version of Troika! ... but it won't be ready for some time.
 

Jacob Lewis

The One with the Force
Those of us who don’t like the FFG dice system understand its purpose, and why others like it. We just don’t enjoy the gameplay that it creates.
Granted. The system is not for everyone, nor is it intended to be. I personally enjoy that we have multiple systems available that offer different playing experiences for everyone. Otherwise, what's the point?

Likewise, I don’t want to spend time discussing mechanics during play. That is time spent with my mind on the system rather than on what’s happening in the imagined world.
And this is why I don't believe you do actually understand the purpose of the dice, or why "others" actually like it. We (i.e. my groups that I play with and run in my games) don't discuss the mechanics any more or less than any other system. The difference, however, is that the narrative is introduced before the mechanics are involved, and then the mechanics produces more possibilities and discussions that go back into the ongoing narrative.

FFG narrative dice system enables 18 different outcomes for one roll of the dice. It seems to me that it turns everything into a melodrama of complications. For when describing what the dice mean is more fun than deciding what you want your character to do.

Personally Critical Success, Success, Failure, Critical Failure strikes me as good enough variation of outcome. With the emphasis being getting on with story progressing the plot. Not simply the plot of doing a single action.
You're limiting yourself by keeping the same expectations you have for all the other game systems that do exactly what you described: generate a singular outcome for a singular action. That is neither plot, nor narrative, nor story. It does not convey any greater sense of drama, suspense, action, or humor. It is simply a test of whether your character succeeds at the moment of decision or action based on your choices as a person playing a game.

In the game you describe, your character attempts to appease the Hutt after botching a job for him as a favor to your employer. You roll a Diplomacy check, add whatever modifiers are baked in to your character sheet or at the DM's discretion, and you either do or do not.

In my game, the entertainer offers to perform for the Hutt to celebrate his small victory and his return to status despite losing his new mining facility to a bunch of murder-droids. It is a hard sell, but the character is good at telling people what they want to hear. But Hutt's are notoriously fickle and hard to deceive or persuade, so the difficulty is upgraded. Also, he is not happy that the group did not achieve all of their objectives, so the attempt has setbacks. But the group did bring back the workers and the credits the Hutt asked for in the first place, so boosts are also appropriate. Understanding all that goes into this process is as much a part of the roleplaying as figuring the dice itself. Now here's the kicker:

The result generates not only a success, but a Triumph AND a Despair. We stopped to think about this for a moment, and then it quickly hits me. The Hutt is so taken with both the character's negotiation and offer to perform at the event, the Hutt forgives the group's failures but decides to make the zeltron his own personal entertainer! And that became a whole new session I had to improvise for the group to get their friend back.

If your system of choice works for you, that's great! Have fun with that. But don't assume that is the only way to play, or expect every system should give you the same kind of experience. :)
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
Granted. The system is not for everyone, nor is it intended to be. I personally enjoy that we have multiple systems available that offer different playing experiences for everyone. Otherwise, what's the point?


And this is why I don't believe you do actually understand the purpose of the dice, or why "others" actually like it. We (i.e. my groups that I play with and run in my games) don't discuss the mechanics any more or less than any other system. The difference, however, is that the narrative is introduced before the mechanics are involved, and then the mechanics produces more possibilities and discussions that go back into the ongoing narrative.


You're limiting yourself by keeping the same expectations you have for all the other game systems that do exactly what you described: generate a singular outcome for a singular action. That is neither plot, nor narrative, nor story. It does not convey any greater sense of drama, suspense, action, or humor. It is simply a test of whether your character succeeds at the moment of decision or action based on your choices as a person playing a game.

In the game you describe, your character attempts to appease the Hutt after botching a job for him as a favor to your employer. You roll a Diplomacy check, add whatever modifiers are baked in to your character sheet or at the DM's discretion, and you either do or do not.

In my game, the entertainer offers to perform for the Hutt to celebrate his small victory and his return to status despite losing his new mining facility to a bunch of murder-droids. It is a hard sell, but the character is good at telling people what they want to hear. But Hutt's are notoriously fickle and hard to deceive or persuade, so the difficulty is upgraded. Also, he is not happy that the group did not achieve all of their objectives, so the attempt has setbacks. But the group did bring back the workers and the credits the Hutt asked for in the first place, so boosts are also appropriate. Understanding all that goes into this process is as much a part of the roleplaying as figuring the dice itself. Now here's the kicker:

The result generates not only a success, but a Triumph AND a Despair. We stopped to think about this for a moment, and then it quickly hits me. The Hutt is so taken with both the character's negotiation and offer to perform at the event, the Hutt forgives the group's failures but decides to make the zeltron his own personal entertainer! And that became a whole new session I had to improvise for the group to get their friend back.

If your system of choice works for you, that's great! Have fun with that. But don't assume that is the only way to play, or expect every system should give you the same kind of experience. :)
You just described talking about the mechanics.
 

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