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Which 'foreign' languages have seen D&D?

Dungeonosophy

Adventurer
Besides English, which languages have a D&D rulebook, from any edition?

Unless otherwise noted, these were referenced from Acaeum's BECMI and AD&D1e foreign editions list:


- Basic D&D: by Dalmau Pla
- AD&D 2e: by Ediciones Zinco
- DnD 3e: by Devir
- DnD 3.5: by Devir
- DnD 4e: by Devir
- Pathfinder by Devir (reportedly in progress)​


Read more: http://www.enworld.org/forum/showth...ign-languages-have-seen-D-amp-D#ixzz33X9WDDGG

Does anyone here at ENworld know if 2e, 3e, or 4e have reached other languages?
 
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Askaval30

Explorer
I know for a fact (having had the books and played with them) that D&D 2e, 3e and 4e were translated in Italian, Pathfinder as well I'd imagine. curious question btw, what brought it on?
 


Dungeonosophy

Adventurer
What brought it on.

I know for a fact (having had the books and played with them) that D&D 2e, 3e and 4e were translated in Italian, Pathfinder as well I'd imagine. curious question btw, what brought it on?

The question is informal research toward these things I've been wondering about:

  • I've been wondering if D&D has ever been published in a 'stateless' language, such as Catalan. It's a followup to my request for 5e translations to appear in smaller languages (on another thread).
  • I'm interested in actually fun things such as D&D and Star Wars (rather than 'pre-chewed' boring textbooks) being used as a tool for learning and propagating languages.
  • I'm interested in finding out what are names for in-game things in various languages (such as 'elf' and 'sword' and 'fireball'), because some of the in-game languages are essentially Real World languages, such as the Espan (Spanish) and Verdan (Portugues) languages of Mystara. So knowing the D&D terminology in Spanish and Portuguese gives a window into those in-game languages. I've started gathering such "Gamer's Glossaries".
  • I'm imagining what my Culture Books idea would look like in 5e. These would be like the Oriental Adventures or 2e Historical Reference series, but for every world culture. It'd be swell to make a Turtle Island Adventures sourcebook which featured a table of in-game words in a variety of Indigenous North American languages, or a Celtic Adventures book which gave Irish, Scottish Gaelic, Welsh, Breton, and Gaulish glossaries for spell names, monsters, and so forth. ...And furthermore, for those books to also be translated into various Indigenous North American and Celtic languages, as an authentically fun vehicle for language cultivation.

Curiously, there are Wikipedia entries for D&D in many rare and wonderful languages, such as Lowland Scots, Occitan, and Welsh.

That's what brought it on.
 
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Besides English, which languages have a D&D rulebook, from any edition?

Just going by the BECMI and AD&D1e foreign editions list, there is:

Danish
Dutch
Finnish
French
German
Hebrew
Italian
Japanese
Norwegian
Portuguese
Spanish
Swedish

Does anyone here at ENworld know if 2e, 3e, or 4e have reached other languages?

I saw several 1E books in Hebrew, which was pretty awesome. I've also seen 1E in French. I'm pretty sure I've seen a 2E PHB in Hebrew, too.
 

Echohawk

Shirokinukatsukami fan
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Jan van Leyden

Adventurer
The only deliberate German edition was AD&D 2e: handled by a major boardgame company, widely distributed, and with a rather careful selection of products (Amigo even did their own conversions of 1e material). Sadly, Amigo, being WotC's German partner for Magic, gained the licence only after the acquisition of TSR by WotC.

3e started out under Amigo as well, but they probably missed the opportunity, publishing the core books more than a year after the originals. The license was later transferred to Feder & Schwert, the German publishing partner of White Wolf. F&S was rather busy as well, publishing quite a number of books. They also started out with 4e, but refused to prolong the license after the first three books. Rumour has it that WotC demanded numbers of sales F&S wasn't willing tu guarantee.

Since then - end of 2008 - nothing. And hearing the French publisher balking at WotC's demands, I don't see any German company doing D&DN.
 

diaglo

Adventurer
D&D was first written in American English.
there is a distinct difference when you read English say from White Dwarf or the fiend folio conversions.

so add English to the list.
 

Dungeonosophy

Adventurer
D&D was first written in American English.
there is a distinct difference when you read English say from White Dwarf or the fiend folio conversions.

so add English to the list.

English is there. The Acaeum says that the British printings of the BECMI and 1e core rulebooks used the US spellings unaltered. Did the TSR UK-specific publications, such as Fiend Folio and B10: Night's Dark Terror, use British spellings?
 

Dungeonosophy

Adventurer
I can contribute a few more languages: (snip)

Thanks! The Hungarian names for classes and spells would be useful in Mystara's quasi-Hungarian Koryszegy area of western Karameikos, and the City-State of Zvornik on the Savage Coast. Likewise Korean and Chinese "gamer's glossaries" would be useful for OA adventures. Just using the Chinese names for 'fireball' and 'fighter' (wushi) would give a campaign a non-European feel.
 


Vicente

Explorer
The following versions were translated to Spanish AFAIK:

- BECMI: by Dalmau Pla - Edit: seems we only got the Basic (red) box.
- AD&D 2e: by Ediciones Zinco
- DnD 3e: by Devir
- DnD 3.5: by Devir
- DnD 4e: by Devir

Borras translated several DnD games, but not sure which edition they are.

Regards!
 
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Zeppo

Explorer
In Finland, the BECMI set (minus the Immortal rules) was translated in the late 1980s. A Finnish translation of the AD&D 2nd edition was also in the works, but the project was cancelled in the early 1990s when the publisher went under.

In 2012, I published a full translation of the 3.5 SRD on a website called Lohikäärmeen Luola ('Dragon's Den'); basically, it's the Finnish equivalent of the Hypertext d20SRD, except that it only contains the core rules.

edit: Oh, and since you're looking for "gamer's glossaries", here is the comprehensive Finnish-English glossary for Lohikäärmeen Luola.
 
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Dungeonosophy

Adventurer
In Finland, the BECMI set (minus the Immortal rules) was translated in the late 1980s. A Finnish translation of the AD&D 2nd edition was also in the works, but the project was cancelled in the early 1990s when the publisher went under.

In 2012, I published a full translation of the 3.5 SRD on a website called Lohikäärmeen Luola ('Dragon's Den'); basically, it's the Finnish equivalent of the Hypertext d20SRD, except that it only contains the core rules.

Thanks, I'll add that to the OP.

Oh, and since you're looking for "gamer's glossaries", here is the comprehensive Finnish-English glossary for Lohikäärmeen Luola.

That's cool. I only know of one official Finnish analogue in the D&D Worlds--Vaasa in the Forgotten Realms is likely to have been originally conceived as a "FR-Finland", though it came to be mixed with other fantastic motifs. (Well, and Hyperborea from Conan's Hyborian Age, since there were a few D&D Conan products.)

There's also Mielikki and Loviatar, and their planar realms, and the rest of the Finnish pantheon from the 1e Deities & Demigods.

In Mystara amateur works, there's the Kingdom of Kaarjala.

How flavorful for a Vaasan PC or Vaasan campaign to use these words:

taistelija "fighter"
paladiini "paladin"
samooja "ranger"
barbaari "barbarian"
velho "wizard"
taikuri "sorcerer"
pappi "cleric"
druidi "druid"
munkki "monk"

haltia "elf"
kääpiö "dwarf"
puolituinen "halfling"
maahinen "gnome"
puoliörkki "half-orc"

spell names:
tulipallo
"fireball"
taikavasama "magic missile"

luolasto "dungeon"
lohikäärme "dragon"

I'd like to see a Finnish "gamer glossary" included in a 5E Hyperborean Adventures culture book, which also included Estonian, Saami, perhaps some of the Finnic languages of inner Russia (Komi, Mari), some representative Siberian languages (Yakut and Chukchi), Ainu (from northern Japan), Aleut, and Inuit.

There'd be a whole chapter on "Finnish or Quasi-Finnish Adventures", with Vaasa as one campaign model, and a "Finnic Earth" as another, an 1890s "Gothic Finland" from Masque of the Red Death, and 5e "D&D Modern" Urban Arcana Finland as another.

"Finnic Earth" would be an entire D&D World which is actually shaped to be like how Finnic legend portrays the earth, as in the Kalevala, the Kalevipoeg, and the Mastorava.
 




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