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Which Magic the Gathering setting would you want added officially to D&D?

cbwjm

I can add a custom title.
There are so many great MtG settings that it would be hard to choose one. Dominaria sounds like it would be a classic fantasy setting. I have the art book, there is a lot in there. I think it would also need a history book that lets you play during the brothers war, the ice age, maybe also check out the thran. Could even create an adventure where the players go back and stop the rise of Phyrexia.

Shards of Alara would be excellent, a whole world split into 5 each developing distinct cultures and worlds based on which of the 3 mana they have access to. I'd want there to be ways to travel between them without requiring planeswalking.

Zendikar is a setting of high adventure, it was essentially DnD in MtG with creatures that could level up and with traps and things. I think it would be cool to the point where I went through all of the old articles on the setting to but together a guide.

Theros is another setting which I've gathered up all the info I could find online to develop a mini setting. I think this would make for a great heroic setting.
 

Vael

Adventurer
I'm definitely hyped for Eldraine, looking forward to the set. And the mix of Fairy Tale and Camelot high Fantasy is definitely a draw, I could see a DnD campaign working here. But I'm interested in how a more alien plane would work. Unfortunately, WoTC has a habit of blowing up or radically altering their worlds. I'm more interested in Alara when they were separate shards. Or Mirrodin pre-New Phyrexia. Though, admittedly, a Tarkir campaign about bringing back the Khans and clans and overthrowing the Dragons would also intrigue me.

I also, have to admit, I'm intrigued at the idea of a merged Multiverse. On the MTG side, Post-Mending, it used to be that only Planeswalkers could planar travel, but the planar bridge from Kaladesh means that is no longer the case. Meanwhile, that was never the case on the DnD side, planar travel didn't need a Spark, places like Sigil exist.
 

Ash Mantle

Explorer
Chill, Garruk, you're not yourself when you're hungry :LOL:
The trailer looks amazing by the way, though it seems everything is heading down Eldraine. I've lapsed from playing Magic, and usually just borrow my friends' cards but the hype is real.

As for Magic settings, I actually really wish if Wizards could release locations, magic items with combined bestiaries in softcover, lower page format, and have advice on how to integrate these with their already released products. That would be excellent.
Take ToA and Ixalan, you could have the Magic supplement be a 64 page softcover filled with adventure location ideas, races, a more expanded bestiary, and with lots of the magic items. Definitely like an expanded Planeshift document.
 

MockingBird

Explorer
Just checked out the Eldraine trailer. I'm at a "I'm not sure" for a possible setting for D&D. I mean ginger bread people? I know its fairy tale themed. Someone mentioned Camelot so I got interested but that trailer turned me off a bit.
 

Giltonio_Santos

Adventurer
Dominaria, because it's still my favorite MtG setting and the theme they've chosen to return to it recently ("history matters") seems like something that D&D could also explore in fun and interesting ways.

Barring that, I'd probably choose "alternate present" Tarkir (the one where dragons still exist). I believe it would add the most to the choices we have right now. Innistrad, for example, is a great setting, but Ravenloft does the job for me. Ixalan and Kamigawa are very cool as well, but I'm fine with Maztica and Kara-Tur.
 

Vael

Adventurer
Just checked out the Eldraine trailer. I'm at a "I'm not sure" for a possible setting for D&D. I mean ginger bread people? I know its fairy tale themed. Someone mentioned Camelot so I got interested but that trailer turned me off a bit.
Eldraine = Camelot + Fairy Tales

Hopefully with a bit more Grimm, and a little less Disney and Shrek. But there is definitely some of that whimsy, which, admittedly, I think is a feature. Still, consider the Little Mermaid card:


I love that flavour text. Makes the whole story of the card not just about thingamabobs.
 

doctorbadwolf

Adventurer
Two things.

First, the Planeshift articles aren’t official, aren’t well playtested, and aren’t especially balanced. They’re also quite brief. So, I really don’t understand how folks see them as constituting coverage of those worlds. It’s like saying Dragonlance has been covered in 5e because it got a paragraph or two in a couple sidebars.

Secondly, what I’d want to see is a guide to the Planes, with chapters on a mix of the most popular Planes and the most oddball ones, along with rules or guidelines on Planeswalking, and a guide to world building and using mana as a world building concept.
 

Blue

Orcus on a bad hair day
Old TSR (original owners of D&D) ended up with a big financial issue because they split the fanbase into chunks with too many settings. It costs the same to produce a book (art, content, mechanic balancing, editting and layout, etc.) regardless if it is material that everyone can use or just a fraction of the fanbase.

So what I really hope they do is let us fans publish our works on DMsguild.
 

Dausuul

Legend
Since we are now on to a second page, I'll copy Urriak's request from the OP:

If you feel like Magic doesn't deserve another setting book, please take a deep breath and don't post anything. I'd prefer if this thread doesn't get bogged down in that debate, and I agree that other settings like Dragonlance, Greyhawk and Dark Sun get a book first. This is a "what if" question, nothing more.
 
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Well...i know it isnt actually a setting in mtg as of yet but it clearly is a theoretical one.

The obyriths are implied to have come from a crystal sphere that they ruined. Or possibly even further away. Multiversal alien gods.

The eldrazi canonically have gods that we've never seen. I think the obyriths could fit the bill as being some of the higher parts of their pantheon.

Bring in small sections of that other crystal sphere. Make the eldrazi home planes (yes plural) be the fractured remnant of what happened when some obyrithian far planes melded with some prime planes (and assume it went anything but well) and make the obyriths be the tyranical yet in the end negligent gods who the majority of which left said universe behind not bothering to take responsibility for the wretchedness they wroght.
 

robus

Lowcountry Low Roller
First, the Planeshift articles aren’t official, aren’t well playtested, and aren’t especially balanced. They’re also quite brief. So, I really don’t understand how folks see them as constituting coverage of those worlds. It’s like saying Dragonlance has been covered in 5e because it got a paragraph or two in a couple sidebars.
The plane shift docs are intended as companions to the art books. By themselves they're nothing more than guides to races and a few monsters. With the art books, however, they're great invitations to adventuring.

And really how much play testing does a new race need particularly - aren't the design constraints are well established with the wide variety of official races in the PHB? And any monsters are generally rebadged MM creatures. Playtest and balance complaints seem unfounded?
 

Urriak Uruk

Explorer
First, the Planeshift articles aren’t official, aren’t well playtested, and aren’t especially balanced. They’re also quite brief. So, I really don’t understand how folks see them as constituting coverage of those worlds. It’s like saying Dragonlance has been covered in 5e because it got a paragraph or two in a couple sidebars.
I will say that for some of the worlds, especially Amonkhet, the plane doesn't really have enough development within it to make a full book seem particularly likely. So I do appreciate that it's got a planeshift article.

I'll also say that it's possible (I won't say likely) the planeshifts are meant to tie the playbase down until something more official is made, much like the Wayfinder's Guide before the hardcover book.
 

robus

Lowcountry Low Roller
I'll also say that it's possible (I won't say likely) the planeshifts are meant to tie the playbase down until something more official is made, much like the Wayfinder's Guide before the hardcover book.
I'd love to know how GGtR did... Wyatt says the Plane shift docs are so popular they led the way to the Ravnica book, but is the experiment done? Or is this the start of a line of cross-over books. To me it seems obvious that they should make a setting book to accompany a new Magic card block. Basically instead of doing the art books, make a D&D setting book that includes lots of lovely Magic artwork - two birds one stone.

And really the duplication in effort in world-building seems silly to me. The old D&D worlds were created before the art of world building really came of age (and there's an absolute ton of old material to work with, so it's not like more really needs to be written...). Time to turn the page and move forward in a co-ordinated fashion IMHO. :)
 

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