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Who is the quintessential D&D artist?

Name the Quintessential D&D Artist, and his two main sidekicks.

  • Greg Bell

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Tracy Lesch

    Votes: 1 1.1%
  • Dave Sutherland

    Votes: 9 9.5%
  • Erol Otus

    Votes: 36 37.9%
  • Dave Trampier

    Votes: 21 22.1%
  • Darlene

    Votes: 2 2.1%
  • Jeff Dee

    Votes: 8 8.4%
  • Jeff Easley

    Votes: 26 27.4%
  • Larry Elmore

    Votes: 60 63.2%
  • Clyde Caldwell

    Votes: 16 16.8%
  • Keith Parkinson

    Votes: 12 12.6%
  • Daniel Horne

    Votes: 1 1.1%
  • Fred Fields

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Brom

    Votes: 6 6.3%
  • Tony DiTerlizzi

    Votes: 9 9.5%
  • Robh Ruppel

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Jennell Jaquays

    Votes: 2 2.1%
  • Tony Szczudlo

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Todd Lockwood

    Votes: 3 3.2%
  • Sam Wood

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Arnie Swekel

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Glenn Angus

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Wayne Reynolds

    Votes: 9 9.5%
  • Ralph Horsley

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Raymond Swanland

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Tyler Jacobson

    Votes: 2 2.1%
  • Michael Komarck

    Votes: 1 1.1%
  • Jason Rainville

    Votes: 2 2.1%
  • Other

    Votes: 6 6.3%

  • Total voters
    95

BronzeDragon

Explorer
This is a remake of one of my earliest posts on ENWorld AM (Anno Morrus).

In that original post I made a lot of mistakes, including lesser known artists (mostly due to them being more prominent at the time of 3E) and forgetting giants of the past.

This one should be better, and let's see what almost 20 years have done to the landscape.

I'm also altering the format a bit. Now you can pick up to 3 choices. Choose the King, and then two Princes. This should allow people to vote for most of their favorites.

You should find most relevant artists from D&D history in the list, but in case your King is not listed, there is always the "Other" category at the bottom.

P.S.: I've added samples for each artist to a post on the second page.
 
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Von Corellon

Explorer
Jeff Dee for gold!
 

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aco175

Legend
First and always I think of is Larry Elmore from the earliest days. Others are fine and they they have a flavor of varying editions, but Elmore captured D&D for me back in the early days.
 



Blue Orange

Explorer
What era? All these folks are iconic for different eras of D&D. Brom and DiTerlizzi are basically responsible for the Dark Sun and Planescape looks, but didn't have that much influence on the larger D&D 2e gestalt. Todd Lockwood is just as important for 3e as Larry Elmore was for late 1e/2e (especially Dragonlance) or Dave Sutherland or Dave Trampier were for 1e or Jeff Dee for BECMI D&D. Otus has a particularly fever-dreamish colored-ice style that was pinched by OSR artists (as well as dragging Otus himself out of retirement) trying to specifically evoke the hallucinatory, gonzo aspects of early D&D.

We've got almost 50 years of D&D, I don't think there's one person at this point. The Art & Arcana book has nice spreads of how monsters like the beholder changed over the decades.
 
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BronzeDragon

Explorer
What era? All these folks are iconic for different eras of D&D. Brom and DiTerlizzi are basically responsible for the Dark Sun and Planescape looks, but didn't have that much influence on the larger D&D 2e gestalt. Todd Lockwood is just as important for 3e as Larry Elmore was for late 1e/2e (especially Dragonlance) or Dave Sutherland or Dave Trampier were for 1e or Jeff Dee for BECMI D&D. Otus has a particularly fever-dreamish colored-ice style that was pinched by OSR artists (as well as dragging Otus himself out of retirement) trying to specifically evoke the hallucinatory, gonzo aspects of early D&D.

We've got almost 50 years of D&D, I don't think there's one person at this point. The Art & Arcana book has nice spreads of how monsters like the beholder changed over the decades.

Hence allowing three picks. If you want you can do one for, call it "Early D&D", then one for "AD&D" and one for "Late D&D".

The question is almost an impossible one, I know, but it's still an interesting thing to see what kind of artists come to mind instantly when someone says "D&D art".
 


Uta-napishti

Explorer
Team Easley! First really world class artist on the team as far as I am concerned. Now there are many at that level connected to D&D now, but Easley stood head and shoulders above the other guys back then IMHO. (Also voted for Brom and Tyler Jacobson, who are both unbelievably talented).
 





ART!

Hero
Dude, I need samples with each name to answer this poll! :) I don't have time to Google Image Search all those names!
 


Sacrosanct

Legend
James Holloway. He injected a lot of humor into things. Especially the Desert of Desolation series.
He might not be the definitive artist, but he was one of my favorites because while everyone else was going gonzo cheesecake in the 80s, he was keeping it real. His art depicted real looking people, using real gear.
 


Marc_C

Solo Role Playing
Darleen and her Greyhawk map is quintessential. Only female artist, which is an acheivement.

Edit: Other female artists I didn't know about:
Keenan Powell, Cookie Corey, Jean Wells and Laura Roslof.
 
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