D&D 5E Will you pay $50.00 for the "standard" PHB?

Will you pay $50.00 for a "standard" PHB?

  • Yes.

    Votes: 111 53.6%
  • No.

    Votes: 55 26.6%
  • Undecided.

    Votes: 41 19.8%

Sound of Azure

Contemplative Soul
Yeah, I will. As an Australian, we've always payed a premium on books- so that's a relatively normal price for a core rpg book. Like [MENTION=22260]TerraDave[/MENTION] though, I would not object to a lower price.
 

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Mercurius

Legend
Will I? Probably not, as the closest game store is 20 minutes away, more of a Magic store, and a bit creepy to boot, and the next closest is about 45 minutes away and I have no particular allegiance to, so will probably end up buying it on Amazon for $30-35.

Would I? Most definitely. First of all, people seem to not understand the words "inflation" or the nature of current printing costs. $50 for a 320-page hardbound color book is not hugely overpriced. Remember that $35 in 2003 - the year and price of the 3.5E PHB - is $44.49 today. Add in increased cost of printing and $50 isn't so far-fetched.

Secondly, while Pathfinder is better value, its not the game I want to play - too complex, too 3.5. I want Next.

Thirdly, how many of us spend hundreds, even thousands, of dollars over an edition? All hobbies cost money and I'm not going to balk at $100-150 start-up cost for 5E (not to mention that the actual start-up cost seems to be $20 for the starter set, not $100-150).
 

Mistwell

Crusty Old Meatwad (he/him)
Here is an inflation calculator.

I believe the first D&D Player's Handbook was released in 1977, for $15.00.

That would be $57.90 in today's dollars. So, $50.00 is a discount, and well in line with the printing costs and marketplace of today.

More importantly, you can now buy it for $30-$37 at an online retailer like Amazon or Barnes and Noble, something you could not do back in 1977. If you simply cannot pay $50, you probably can pay $30-$37.

I'm just not understanding people who say they will not buy the game if the cover price is $50. Why wouldn't they just turn to an online seller of the game, if that is the case? Is $30-$37 also too steep a price? I appreciate wanting to support your local game store, but at the expense of not being able to buy a game at all that you want to buy? That makes no sense to me.
 

DaveMage

Slumbering in Tsar
No, I'm done with the edition treadmill.

What I might buy, though, are 5e adventures or campaign fluff books if they are done well and if the rules are all posted online for free. (That way I can translate any rules to my game of choice.)
 

Depends on two things:
1) size
2) optional content

If the book is a big, thick 450-page tome with dozens of optional rules, a tactical combat module, a craptonne of subclasses and feats, and the like it will be worth $50. And it will hurt my wallet and I will have to live on Ramen at GenCon, but I will buy it.


If it's the standard 330-odd-pages then, no, the print runs WotC can generate should keep the price far below that and it feels like a cash grab. So no.
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
No, I'm done with the edition treadmill.

I stopped thinking about it as an edition treadmill.

Each year, I buy a couple of games. Every few years, one of the couple of games I buy happens to be a flavor of D&D.

It is only a treadmill if you're trying to pursue WotC D&D, specifically. Otherwise, it is just another game purchase.
 

Here is an inflation calculator.

I believe the first D&D Player's Handbook was released in 1977, for $15.00.

That would be $57.90 in today's dollars. So, $50.00 is a discount, and well in line with the printing costs and marketplace of today.

More importantly, you can now buy it for $30-$37 at an online retailer like Amazon or Barnes and Noble, something you could not do back in 1977. If you simply cannot pay $50, you probably can pay $30-$37.

I'm just not understanding people who say they will not buy the game if the cover price is $50. Why wouldn't they just turn to an online seller of the game, if that is the case? Is $30-$37 also too steep a price? I appreciate wanting to support your local game store, but at the expense of not being able to buy a game at all that you want to buy? That makes no sense to me.
It's only partially about the amount of money, and more the perceived value. Let's face it, most of us here wouldn't bat an eye and being asked to drop $50 on a video game, because we know those start at $60.
But we've gotten used to $40 books, and now the price is jumping up by 25%.

There are two other factors.
1) They charged that much for deluxe collector's edition reprints with smaller print runs. While the gold gilding was nice, the low print runs are what raised the prices of those.
2) Their competitors aren't charging that much for standard sized product.

It's not that we wouldn't spend $50 on an RPG book (history says we will), the question is one of the price being appropriate for what is being sold.
D&D should be able to warrant print runs large enough to keep the prices lower.
Unless there's something we don't know about, like the cover being fancy or the book being giant.
 

billd91

Not your screen monkey (he/him)
Here is an inflation calculator.

I believe the first D&D Player's Handbook was released in 1977, for $15.00.

I have my doubts the original price was $15 for the PH (though it was for the DMG). When I bought mine in 1981, it was only $11 (maybe 11.99) and that was not a particularly discounted outlet. And plugging that in gives me about $30 in 2014 dollars. That does compare quite reasonably with the discounted amount the B&N site was projecting, so I don't have a major complaint.

That said, I'm not going to chide anyone for being shy of that sticker price. I'm gainfully employed and I still try to avoid dropping $50 on a single book - much less an expected $150 on the three core books for D&D.
 

GMMichael

Guide of Modos
No, I'm done with the edition treadmill.

What I might buy, though, are 5e adventures or campaign fluff books if they are done well and if the rules are all posted online for free. (That way I can translate any rules to my game of choice.)

Why pay $50 for just a PHB, when you can get free games like this one?

I got off the treadmill back in 3.5. I started writing Modos RPG early in the playtest of Next. With excellent roleplaying sites like ENworld and OnePageDungeon, there's no reason why the RPG community can't produce its own deluge of RPG content that forces Wizards to evolve into a tree-friendly, roleplaying resource.

(Speaking of community content, the game I'm working on is intentionally rules-light and modular so it can be modified to meet the needs of the user. For example, the Damage on a Miss fans can seamlessly include such rules in their own Modos rules modules...)
 


Mistwell

Crusty Old Meatwad (he/him)
It's only partially about the amount of money, and more the perceived value.[remainder of argument cut for ease of reading]

So it sounds to me like you're saying you wouldn't buy a game you want to buy, based on principal? (I am not judging that, just trying to clarify it).
 


Agamon

Adventurer
"Will I?" I'd have to say no, because I don't think that's what's being offered, so I don't think I'll actually have the opportunity.

Now, "Would I, hypothetically"? Maybe. Not sight unseen.
 

Mistwell

Crusty Old Meatwad (he/him)
I have my doubts the original price was $15 for the PH (though it was for the DMG). When I bought mine in 1981, it was only $11 (maybe 11.99) and that was not a particularly discounted outlet.

Right but that's not how you judge inflation for a book. You go by first publication date. It's impossible to be perfectly able to keep up with inflation, because once the book is on a shelf it's already out of date because inflation occurred in the shipment time. The initial price and initial publication date is the one you judge it by. That's what represents their cost of the book, R&D, and it's when most of the sales take place. Later ones are simply reprintings, and often don't reflect the actual book price at release.

But even if it were $11.99 (which is not a price I remember, but maybe it's the right one), then by 1977 to 2014 dollars that would be $46.28 today.
 

So it sounds to me like you're saying you wouldn't buy a game you want to buy, based on principal? (I am not judging that, just trying to clarify it).
If a company is charging 25% more for something but not increasing the value I'm hesitant to buy. Even if it is something I want.
If Rocksteady games comes out and says "we're charging $75 for Batman: Arkham Knight instead ofthe usual $60" I will want to see reviews first praising it as excellent (and looong) and/or wait for a sale.

I'm not averse to paying $50 for games, although it is a little steep. I've bought a couple hardcover RPGs at that price. However, most were single volume products, so it was a one time $50 fee and they were much smaller companies able to sell a fraction of the copies as WotC.
 

DEFCON 1

Legend
Supporter
Absolutely.

I don't care one whit about what other games are priced as. If I wanted those games, I'd buy those games. But I'm buying D&D 5E because I want D&D 5E.

It's like asking me why I'm buying Hellmann's mayonaise when I could get a generic brand of mayonaise for cheaper? If they're both mayonaise, then it shouldn't matter, right? Hellman's should lower their price to match the other brand.

Yeah, no. That's not how it works, and I understand that. Am I paying extra partially for the brand of Hellmann's and D&D? Yup. But I'm also paying extra because I just happen to enjoy Hellmann's and D&D more than the other types available. Hell, I already own plenty of other RPGs, so my price point on them is Zero. But I'm not playing those "free" RPGs because I don't want to play those "free" RPGs. Sorry DMMike.
 

Kobold Stew

Last Guy in the Airlock
Supporter
If the book is a big, thick 450-page tome with dozens of optional rules, a tactical combat module, a craptonne of subclasses and feats, and the like it will be worth $50. And it will hurt my wallet and I will have to live on Ramen at GenCon, but I will buy it.

If it's the standard 330-odd-pages then, no, the print runs WotC can generate should keep the price far below that and it feels like a cash grab. So no.

It's only partially about the amount of money, and more the perceived value. Let's face it, most of us here wouldn't bat an eye and being asked to drop $50 on a video game, because we know those start at $60.
But we've gotten used to $40 books, and now the price is jumping up by 25%.

I find it really hard to believe this position is mirrored widely.

* 40 okay, 50 no (especially given that online retailers will offer discounts)
* unless it's big big big
* from someone who can afford to travel to GenCon and chooses to do so (even if you have to eat ramen)?

That seems like an awfully silly abnegation over ten bucks that you clearly have to spend.
 

I find it really hard to believe this position is mirrored widely.

* 40 okay, 50 no (especially given that online retailers will offer discounts)
* unless it's big big big
* from someone who can afford to travel to GenCon and chooses to do so (even if you have to eat ramen)?

That seems like an awfully silly abnegation over ten bucks that you clearly have to spend.
Spending $40 is already tight. I'm getting myself into debt already for the trip, so it's a question of more debt or less. If I'm feeling taken advantage of, it' seas ire to opt for "less".
Especially since I'm Canadian and WotC likes to charge us more for funsies.

And it's worth noting that the "discounted" price online is the cover price of 4e.
 


delericho

Legend
$50 for a 320-page hardbound color book is not hugely overpriced. Remember that $35 in 2003 - the year and price of the 3.5E PHB - is $44.49 today.

According to the RPGnet reviews I've found, the 3.5e books were $30 each in 2003, or $38 in today's money. I'll verify on the covers when I get home tonight.
 

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