D&D (2024) WotC On One D&D Playtest Survey Results: Nearly Everything Scored 80%+!

Status
Not open for further replies.
In a 40-minute video, WotC's Jeremy Crawford discussed the survey feedback to the 'Character Origins' playtest document. Over 40,000 engaged with the survey, and 39,000 completed it. I've summarised the content of the video below.

High Scorers
  • The highest scoring thing with almost 90% was getting a first level feat in your background. This is an example of an experimental thing -- like advantage and disadvantage in the original 5E playtests.
  • Almost everything also scored 80%+.
About The Scoring System
  • 70% or higher is their passing grade. In the 70s is a thumbs up but tinkering need. 80% means the community wants exactly that and WotC treads carefully not to change it too much.
  • In the 60s it's salvageable but it really needs reworking. Below 60% means that there's a good chance they'll drop it, and in the 40s or below it's gone. Nothing was in the 50s or below.
Low Scorers

Only 3 things dipped into the 60s --
  • the d20 Test rule in the Rules Glossary (experimental, no surprise)
  • the ardling
  • the dragonborn
The next UA had a different version of the d20 Test rule, and they expect a very different score when those survey resuts come in.

It was surprising that the dragonborn scored lower than the ardling. The next UA will include new versions of both. The main complaints were:
  • the dragonborn's breath weapon, and confusion between the relationship between that dragonborn and the one in Fizban's Treasury of Dragons.
  • the ardling was trying to do too much (aasimar-like and beast-person).
The ardling does not replace the aasimar. The next version will have a clearer identity.

Everything else scored in the 70s or 80s.

Some more scores:
  • new human 83%
  • dwarf, orc, tiefling, elf tied at 80-81%
  • gnome, halfling tied at 78%
Future installments of Unearthed Arcana
  • The next one will have new ardling and dragonborn, a surprise 'guest', and a new cleric. It will be a shorter document than the previous ones, and the one after that is bigger again. Various class groups.
  • Warrior group digs into something teased in a previous UA sidebar -- new weapon options for certain types of characters. Whole new ways to use weapons.
  • New rules on managing your character's home base. A new subsystem. Create bases with NPCs connected with them, implementing downtime rules. They're calling it the "Bastion System".
  • There will be a total of 48 subclasses in the playtest process.
  • New encounter building rules, monster customization options.
  • New versions of things which appear in the playtest after feedback.
Other Notes
  • Playtests are a version of something with the assumption that if something isn't in the playtest, it's still in the game (eg eldritch blast has not been removed from the game). The mage Unearthed Arcana will feature that.
  • Use an object and other actions are still as defined in the current Player's Handbook. The playtest material is stuff that has changed.
  • Thief subclass's cunning action does not interact with use an object; this is intentional. Removed because the original version is a 'Mother may I?" mechanic - something that only works if the DM cooperates with you. In general mechanics which require DM permission are unsatisfying. The use an object action might go away, but that decision will be a made via the playtest process.
  • The ranger's 1st-level features also relied too heavily on DM buy-in, also wild magic will be addressed.
  • If you have a class feature you should be able to use it in the way you expect.
  • If something is removed from the game, they will say so.
  • Great Weapon Fighting and Sharpshooter were changed because the penalty to the attack roll was not big enough to justify the damage bonus, plus they want warrior classes to be able to rely on their class features (including new weapon options) for main damage output. They don't want any feats to feel mandatory to deal satisfying damage. Feats which are 'must haves' violate their design goals.
  • Light Weapon property amped up by removing the bonus action requirement because requiring light weapon users to use their bonus action meant there were a lot of bad combinations with features and spells which require bonus actions. It felt like a tax on light weapon use.
  • Class spell lists are still an open question. Focus on getting used to the three big spell lists. Feedback was that it would be nice to still have a class list to summarize what can be picked from the 'master lists'. For the bard that would be useful, for the cleric and wizard not necessary as they can choose from the whole divine or arcane list.
The playtest process will continue for a year.

 
Last edited:

log in or register to remove this ad

Levistus's_Leviathan

5e Freelancer
If someone is asked if they like the switch to steak and they say no, because they want it to stay a pizza place then they are being truthful, right?

If they ask if someone if they liked the steak they were served and they liked it but say no then they're lying, right?
There is an implied "do you like this as a change from the original version" in the surveys.
 

log in or register to remove this ad

Because barring 4e, D&D has managed to be 'good enough' for the majority of its player base. Being First + Good Enough = No can Defend.
being first doesn't mean you get a pass Rifts Torg (in a different way WoD that almost got em) all COULD have over taken 1e/2e...

and 4e out sold 3e/3.5e so it has the 'not good enough' to be the second best selling D&D, and holding #1 against it's own predecessor being retro cloned by a company with a huge head start by having run Dragon and Dungeon magazine...
Because being first is VERY powerful when it comes to RPG's.
this is reductive... how do we know how powerful being first is "because D&D is popular"
Why is D&D popular? "Because it was first.

it could just be the best game, or it could be as I put forward in my theory the ever changing nature.

1e/2e were pretty close to each other but were also a major change (mostly addative) to basic... but 2e grew FROM 1e.

3e was a reset, it changed a lot, 3.5 grew from 3e... but 3e had huge flaws that 4e fixed... 4e though had to compete with pathfinder (3.75) with an established base but still stayed #1, 5e was a step back in many ways between 3.5 and 4e but it also was new and different... now I am saying that adaptive changing state might have helped it stay #1 in a way basic D&D would not still be #1 if it haden't become AD&D
By 2e D&D had already cemented its market leader position. And the network effect of being the 800lb. Gorilla in the room smooths over any rough edges the system has.
and yet the d10 system from WW somehow got close, and if WotC hadn't bought TSR it was a sinking ship, D&D would be gone.
Because as the market leader, D&D was/is Good Enough, that most players do not feel a compelling reason to go to a different fantasy RPG.
again, we don't know that we just FEEL like that is true.
It takes a unique set of circumstances for Being First + Good Enough to not be a winning advantage.
This is why Ford with the Modal T is still the #1 best selling car... my modal T is so awesome.
 


MGibster

Legend
I'll have you know that Google slept with my girlfriend.
That explains all the photos Google has of your girlfriend.
Be right back, creating an Irritable Bowel Syndrome feat.
It's a spell called Stinking Cloud.
this is reductive... how do we know how powerful being first is "because D&D is popular"
Why is D&D popular? "Because it was first.
I've heard it argued that D&D is the most popular because it was the first, but that's never tracked for me. Oreo is just an imitation Hydrox, but the latter became much more popular than the former. Moxie was one of the first mass produced sodas in the United States, and it's actually still produced today, but have you ever had one? Don't. It tastes like used motor oil. The point being that many things which were original were overtaken by their imitators.
 

EzekielRaiden

Follower of the Way
Before I google search this I am going to say that doesn't feel right...
D&D 3.0 publications says 39
All 53 DnD 5E books published & to be released | Dice Cove says 53...

So okay, more or less (not counting 3pp) 5e has 1.5x the number of books 3.0 did when 3.5 came out
So, the rate was quite a bit faster. About 2 years and 9 months for 39 books means around 14-15 books a year. By comparison, 5e has been out about 6-7 books a year (though it sounds like some of these aren't actually out yet, so it may be closer to 6.)

Overall, I'm actually surprised that I underestimated the amount of 5e books. As a function of the span of time involved here, this changeover isn't so far removed from the 3.5 shift.
 

mamba

Legend
and 4e out sold 3e/3.5e so it has the 'not good enough' to be the second best selling D&D, and holding #1 against it's own predecessor being retro cloned by a company with a huge head start by having run Dragon and Dungeon magazine...

Did it outsell 3e ? I have no absolute sales figures, but that sounds incredibly hard to believe, esp. since the second part of the above is patently false. Maybe it did for the first month or quarter, I doubt it did so in the long run.

The Retroclone became #1 during the 4e period while 4e gradually slid to third place

Fall 2008: 4e launched, at the time #1
Q3 2009: PF1 launched, instant #2
Q3 2010: tie between 4e and PF1
Q2 2011: PF1 #1
Fall 2012: 4e sliding to 3rd place
Fall 2013: 4e sliding to 4th place
Spring 2014: 4e no longer in top 5
Summer 2014: 5e launched
Fall 2015: 5e in #1, replacing PF1

So you have a solid 4 years with PF1 as #1 while 4e gradually slides into oblivion

source: Top 5 RPGs Compiled Charts 2004-Present
 
Last edited:


Did it outsell 3e ? I have no absolute sales figures, but that sounds incredibly hard to believe, esp. since the second part of the above is patently false. Maybe it did for the first month or quarter, I doubt it did so in the long run.
nobody has sales figures... we have statements form wotc (D&D 3E/3.5 - 4E vs 3E Sales Figures: The Facts) that 3.5 out sold 3, that 4e outsold 3.5 and that 5e out sold 4e... we also have been told in general all of them outsold 2e/1e but that comes with the covet that those numbers are not clean... so all we know is that the only source we have says each edition sold more then the last.
The Retroclone became #1 during the 4e period while 4e gradually slid to third place
why do you want to turn this into an edition war? do you have an axe to grind?
Fall 2008: 4e launched, at the time #1
Q3 2009: PF1 launched, instant #2
Q3 2010: tie between 4e and PF1
Q2 2011: PF1 #1
Fall 2012: 4e sliding to 3rd place
Fall 2013: 4e sliding to 4th place
Spring 2014: 4e no longer in top 5
Summer 2014: 5e launched
Fall 2015: 5e in #1, replacing PF1

So you have a solid 4 years with PF1 as #1 while 4e gradually slides into oblivion

source: Top 5 RPGs Compiled Charts 2004-Present
I have already spent too much time on pointless edition wars you will ignore and tell me I am wrong, but pF was a strong 2nd place (like world of darkness before it) up until 4e's last book or two and then a dead zone and the next playtest...
 


mamba

Legend
why do you want to turn this into an edition war? do you have an axe to grind?
no, I am simply pointing out that your statement was wrong.

pF was a strong 2nd place (like world of darkness before it) up until 4e's last book or two and then a dead zone and the next playtest...
If that is true that would mean the last 4e book came 2.5 years or so after the 4e launch, which would mean by then it was clear that 4e was dead in the water (and we are still 5+ years away from 5e at that point)

EDIT: looks like the 4e books came out over about 4 years, but the core books all do fall in a 2.5 year span, including the Essentials version
 
Last edited:

Status
Not open for further replies.
Remove ads

Remove ads

AD6_gamerati_skyscraper

Remove ads

Upcoming Releases

Top