D&D (2024) 2024 Core rule book changes

MoonSong

Rules-lawyering drama queen but not a munchkin
I know this topic can be charged. But I disagree that it matters to have specific half-elves and half-orcs as unique rules objects that are called out.

I am a person that wants more diverse mixed-heritage options, but does not like the idea of a 3rd-party voice/narrator/writer grouping mixed-heritage peoples into "half"-anything. That's the only problem. They are whole individuals who as a character, individually choose if they want to identify as "half"-something, or utilize some other descriptor that is natural to their personal culture or sensibilities.

If there was a rules object called a "Half-orc" what does that even mean to a new player? Half-what? Can the other half of a half-orc be tiefling? If so, do they use the half-orc rules? Of course not. That naming convention doesn't work in a paradigm of dozens of mixed-orc possibilities. It is also untenable to invent new names for mixed races in the PH, not only because there are hundreds of pairings to have to invent, but also those naming conventions are not multiversal, rather are individually campaign-specific. We should not call all elf/dwarf hybrids "Dwelfs" or all elf/human hybrids "Khoravar" because those should be campaign-specific if the table wants to do that.

The baseline naming convention should be campaign-neutral and be able to convey any species combination. I'm thinking a descriptor like "Mixed" and the use of the two most prevalent species heritages that the character embodies. Some of the below descriptor options are better than others (I don't like Hybrid, to be honest), but I'll use some combos to show examples in use:
  • Mixed Human/Orc
  • Dwarf/Elf Descendant
  • Tiefling/Aasimar Hybrid (hybrid sounds like a scientific design choice)
  • Triton/Simic Hybrid Hybrid (nahhh)
  • Dragonborn/Goliath Bloodlines
  • Elf/Kender Parentage (but not all parents are blood)
I've made my feelings about this more clear somewhere else on these boards, but in short.
It is erasure, you no longer have the fictional construct of people who are different admixtures of humans and elves but who share a culture and form an ethnicity on their own. Instead of them forming a group, now they no longer are a default game construct that demands an answer form each campaign and game. Now we have an atomized bunch of combos with nothing in common, and -worse- which are pure fluff without any mechanical backing. So instead of them being a distinct people, all mixed characters are reduced to one-offs disconnected from the grater world. And by lacking mechanics attached to them, I'm at the mercy of the DM and others just disregarding my choices, because fluff without backing is very easily ignored.

The naming convention is unfortunate -and I'm more than open to changing it-. I'm not against the opening of the floodgates to any combo being possible, but the loss of defaults just takes away a lot of it .

For context, my ethnic group consists on basically being mixed. We all are the admixture of two major ethnic groupings of people. I find myself very easily projecting my ethnic identity into half-elves. Particularly as I find myself more obviously mixed than most of my peers.
 

log in or register to remove this ad

Are you expecting a huge swath of completely new to D&D folks to come swarming out of the woodwork to buy all these books? Is WotC?
In the long run? Yes. The 2024 books are preparing for at least the next 10 years of the game, and is literally the springboard for what will come even later. I will be so bold as to predict that the 2024 rulebooks are going to sell even better than the 2014 books. Streaming and actual-plays will keep bringing younger players in, and we older gamers are always introducing the younger generations of players into the game, and while I don't want to be indelicate, we older players are also "aging" out of the game.

The younger generations are more diverse and have more global access than ever before, and the game should evolve as modern sensibilities do. The industry continues to grow and Wizards is not the only company leading the way. Other games, not just D&D clones, are also embracing diversity and are are exploring handling race/heritage differently. Wizards isn't alone in this. The choices these games make will matter more to the younger generation.

Final answer, yes, many more new players will be joining in the next 10 years, and if they cut their teeth on the 2024 books, those diverse options will become the new norm.
 

The naming convention is unfortunate -and I'm more than open to changing it-. I'm not against the opening of the floodgates to any combo being possible, but the loss of defaults just takes away a lot of it .

Allow me to clarify a point that might actually gel with your saying "The naming convention is unfortunate -and I'm more than open to changing it."

Renaming from "Half" is the big thing that needs changed in the books going forward. I would have no problem with a Mixed Elf/Human being an example of a mixed heritage. Heck, the Origins document says "For example, folk who have a human parent and an orc or an elf parent are particularly common. Many other combinations are possible."

It sounds like we can agree on that at least.

I've made my feelings about this more clear somewhere else on these boards, but in short.
It is erasure, you no longer have the fictional construct of people who are different admixtures of humans and elves but who share a culture and form an ethnicity on their own. Instead of them forming a group, now they no longer are a default game construct that demands an answer form each campaign and game. Now we have an atomized bunch of combos with nothing in common, and -worse- which are pure fluff without any mechanical backing. So instead of them being a distinct people, all mixed characters are reduced to one-offs disconnected from the grater world. And by lacking mechanics attached to them, I'm at the mercy of the DM and others just disregarding my choices, because fluff without backing is very easily ignored.

Where we differ is whether or not there should be a unique rules object that provides the same stats for all mixed elf/human peoples. I do want to bring up a point about the narrative. A cohesive half-elf culture does not exist for the published multiverse as a whole outside of specific campaign settings (like the Khoravar of Eberron, or my own, or yours if you have them), and a non-existent multiversal culture isn't being erased. Campaign-specific cultures still exist for these home games. The following text from the 2014 book shows this:

"Half-elves have no lands of their own, though they are welcome in human cities and somewhat less welcome in elven forests. In large cities in regions where elves and humans interact often, half-elves are sometimes numerous enough to form small communities of their own. They enjoy the company of other half-elves, the only people who truly understand what it is to live between these two worlds.​
In most parts of the world, though, half-elves are uncommon enough that one might live for years without meeting another."​
I would argue that the above quote works as a baseline for any population of mixed heritage peoples.

If a true half-elf culture exists in one's campaign and it is very important that they are a race represented by a specific rules object, fans of the legacy "half-races" will still have those same options to choose because the 2014 books aren't going anywhere, and they will continue to be Legacy options in DDB. Khoravar can still use the 2014 PH entry or the Dragonmarked or other options that exist. The individuals aren't being erased. It also would take very little space in a conversion document to say that "races" from earlier sourcebooks can be played with "X" changes. In comparison, just because there will be new Dragonborn, it doesn't mean that the 2014 dragonborn or the Fizban's dragonborn are invalid. They are still options.

From my perspective, if there can't be a unique rules object for all species-pairings in the new book, none of them should have it. And any rule they come up with has to work for all races outside of the PH. And even if Wizards breaks every PH species into cherry-pickable species-ability options, what about all the species that were not printed in the PH?

I have a question. If in 2025 you invited someone to in your home game, and they wanted to play a "half-elf" but they had the stats of an elf or a human, would you allow that?
 

Yup. There are plenty of individual rules expressions that aren't compatible with each other, and no amount of marketing spin will make them so.
Lets see, how realistic is that scenario?

Not very much. That is the answer.

People will decide which PHB they use at a table and then can use any supplement with it. Mixing and matching two books that should clearly be mutually exclusive seems like tryharding to make a point.

They always say: every book besides the other PHB should play nice with both of them.
 

Incenjucar

Legend
With the half-x erasure concern, I really think that would be better served with a full species descended from a handful of different ancestries, rather than half-x. That would better represent long-term mixing and emerging unique culture.
 

With the half-x erasure concern, I really think that would be better served with a full species descended from a handful of different ancestries, rather than half-x. That would better represent long-term mixing and emerging unique culture.
Are you talking about a melting-pot species? Like mongrelfolk?
 


Gorck

Prince of Dorkness
The very first UA (Character Origins) listed 18 sample backgrounds:

Acolyte
Artisan
Charlatan
Criminal
Cultist
Entertainer
Farmer
Gladiator
Guard
Guide
Hermit
Laborer
Noble
Pilgrim
Sage
Sailor
Soldier
Urchin

If this 9x16 formula is correct, I wonder which 2 will be dropped?
 
Last edited:


mamba

Legend
I'm fairly certain the official rule will be that if you use a 2014 class, you also use 2014 feats, backgrounds and spells, and a 2024 class uses 2024 feats, backgrounds and spells. Tasha's and Xanthar's options will be available to both.
Not sure, I lean towards anyone using the 2024 spells, as they are supposedly better balanced for their level, just like monsters get tweaked to more accurately reflect their CR
 

Remove ads

AD6_gamerati_skyscraper

Remove ads

Upcoming Releases

Top