D&D General Are You Ready For A "New" D&D?

Are You Ready For A "New" D&D

  • No, I am Happy With The Choices I Have

    Votes: 71 55.5%
  • Yes, I Want a Truly "New" Version of D&D

    Votes: 25 19.5%
  • It's Complicated...

    Votes: 32 25.0%


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Show me what it does better. I'm not particularly wedded to 5e - but for the least bad D&D it does pretty well (others are better at being them - but 5e is good at being least bad)
 

FitzTheRuke

Legend
I am always ready for a new D&D. My only problem is, I always want the designers to only fix the things that I'd like fixed, not wholesale rebuild the game, like they tend to do. So usually when there's a new edition, there's things I like, and things I don't like about it.

Take 5e: great overall chassis, decent options. Boring monsters. Terrible equipment options (practically nothing to buy whatsoever!) I don't like the skills list and I really don't like how tools work. Too much magic, not enough mundane.

Otherwise, it's one of the better D&D editions, IMO. (My dislike list would be longer for all other editions - but different!)

So I'm always happy for a new edition, with the vain hope that they'll fix things I don't like without throwing out things that I do.
 

Minigiant

Legend
Supporter
I wouldn't say I'm "ready" in the context of being sick of 5e / d20 RPGs, but I would be open to trying out a brand new version of D&D that isn't just an iteration of what's come before. After what happened with 4e, though, I don't expect WotC to try it again any time soon. Perhaps if the D&D brand ever gets sold to / bought by another company we'll get something brand new.
This is what I mean. Pretty much all but one edition and D&D clone since 2000 is an iteration of a previous edition with different math and one innovation. It makes sense since it is easier to convert someone with something similar to what they liked. But it means innovation comes in drips and drabs. And It comes with the assumption that everyone loves what exists.

Well... unless your favorite is 0e, you couldn't love your favorite edition or clone until it was created. Right?
 

aco175

Legend
I was fine with 3e when 4e came out and then found that I liked 4e. I was fine with 4e when 5e came out and now I like 5e. I'm not ready, but would likely enjoy a new edition. I could still play this one for a few/several more yours though with some of the stuff I have.
 

Reynard

Legend
Supporter
This is what I mean. Pretty much all but one edition and D&D clone since 2000 is an iteration of a previous edition with different math and one innovation. It makes sense since it is easier to convert someone with something similar to what they liked. But it means innovation comes in drips and drabs. And It comes with the assumption that everyone loves what exists.

Well... unless your favorite is 0e, you couldn't love your favorite edition or clone until it was created. Right?
I don't think it is fair to call 5e an iteration of 3.5 (in the same way that 3.5 is an iteration of 3E, i mean). Of course they use the same core mechanic and hold on to a lot of legacy elements, but 5e and 3.5 play significantly differently. The devil is, as they say, in the details. They aren't the same game.
 

Minigiant

Legend
Supporter
I don't think it is fair to call 5e an iteration of 3.5 (in the same way that 3.5 is an iteration of 3E, i mean). Of course they use the same core mechanic and hold on to a lot of legacy elements, but 5e and 3.5 play significantly differently. The devil is, as they say, in the details. They aren't the same game.
I didn't say it was the same game. 5e, however, has 3e as its skeleton with a different math structure, a few 4eisms, and a new adv/diadv innovation. It's a whole new game but very little of it didn't come form a previous edition.

Most of the D&Dverse is mixing elements of previous editions,changing the core math, and adding one new cool mechanic. Sometimes... sometimes you'll get two new major mechanics.

There was one time we added a bunch of new ideas to D&D. And although it scared a lot of people, I think a game community built on hombrewing should embrace big experimentation from a major publisher sometimes.
 

Reynard

Legend
Supporter
There was one time we added a bunch of new ideas to D&D. And although it scared a lot of people, I think a game community built on hombrewing should embrace big experimentation from a major publisher sosometimes
I can only assume you are talking about Player's Option.
 



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