D&D 5E As a DM cleric spells to watch out for in 5e?

jgsugden

Legend
So I really like clerics thematically as buff, heal, divination, and some weird utility type spellcasters. Narratively I generally don't like clerical god laser blasting spells, though divine hammer flamestrike and holy word type things don't really rub me the wrong way. Generally I like zaps to be arcane and a lot of damage to come round to round from the martials. With the clerical daily access to anything on the spell list it is easy to find and load up on the rare spells that are arguably off theme or overpowered.

As a DM I have repeatedly been introduced to the PC cleric of my group's favorite 2nd 3rd level spell spirit guardians, the auto damage to enemies only in an area ongoing spell which is super effective. It seems to have significantly altered fights it gets deployed in, which is most of them. My games narratively rarely have large numbers of separate encounter fights per game day so it often gets deployed in combat.

My group is currently 5th level, any other clerical spells you think I should particularly be on the lookout for as he levels and I think about fight encounters? PHB, Xanathars, and Tashas are all books that I have.
You should not be concerned with these spells. There are no spells in any official product that should 'concern' you. They're all fine.

3rd level spells are a very intentional 'upgrade' in power over 2nd level spells. It is intended to be a significant jump. Hypnotic Pattern, Fireball, Fly, Spirit Guardians, Revivify - these open up new levels of power to PCs that were unavailable before. They are intended to change the way the game operates. They are one of the marks, along with abilities like Multi-attack for weapon PCs, that mark the transition to Heroic levels of play.

There is a very common mistake that many DMs make: They fail to realize that D&D is intended to change as PCs advance. The intent is for advancing magics to trivialize things that used to be a challenge to PCs at lower levels. Certain styles of challenge are intended to be too easy once the PCs gain access to powerful divinations, transmutations, etc... This change is what allows the players to see that their PCs are becoming more powerful. When the abilities of the PCs grow, it is something you should emphasize as a DM and celebrate - not something that should concern you.

My advice to you is to not plan for Spirit Guardians unless the NPC has a natural reason to plan for it. Contriving a reason for the enemy to be prepared for it tends to make it look like the DM is a bad sport, that the DM doesn't want the PCs to succeed, and that the DM is more interested in dictating how the game should go than sharing the journey with the players (by allowing them to shape the game with their decisions and character abilities). As a DM, you end up looking like that Fastfood Manager that spills grease on the floor because their clean up crew was cleaning too fast and the manager thought their regional manager needed to see their employees cleaning up more.

At levels 1 to 4 PCs should struggle a bit with mundane problems, and feel like the world is intimidating. From 5 to 10, they should feel like they've found their place and are effective. From 11 to 16 they should feel like they are starting to be real forces in their world - and are capable of making lasting changes to the regions they populate. From levels 17 and above they should feel like they are major players in the world.
 

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Voadam

Legend
By the way Moonbeam was written, we took it as not requiring actually seeing the creature (or even the space where the bottom would be) and it didn't require a too-hit. So it was used to get something behind cover and at another point something on a ledge. With a 5' radius (10' diameter) it could block an entire hallway, and at 40' high even something like a crevice.

I will need to check out Spiritual weapon.
Ahh, I had misread that in my quick lookover of the spell, it is a 5' radius and not a 5' square. That improves it a bit.
 

So if I were to pull the fingernails off an NPC, in an effort to gain information from them... in your game that's 'not torture?
What? Huh? What sort of freakshow D&D games are you running!? What did I say that could possibly make you think I'm running them like that???!!!
 
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ECMO3

Hero
So I really like clerics thematically as buff, heal, divination, and some weird utility type spellcasters. Narratively I generally don't like clerical god laser blasting spells, though divine hammer flamestrike and holy word type things don't really rub me the wrong way. Generally I like zaps to be arcane and a lot of damage to come round to round from the martials. With the clerical daily access to anything on the spell list it is easy to find and load up on the rare spells that are arguably off theme or overpowered.

As a DM I have repeatedly been introduced to the PC cleric of my group's favorite 2nd 3rd level spell spirit guardians, the auto damage to enemies only in an area ongoing spell which is super effective. It seems to have significantly altered fights it gets deployed in, which is most of them. My games narratively rarely have large numbers of separate encounter fights per game day so it often gets deployed in combat.

My group is currently 5th level, any other clerical spells you think I should particularly be on the lookout for as he levels and I think about fight encounters? PHB, Xanathars, and Tashas are all books that I have.
Not sure what you mean by on the look out for.

If you are talking about mechanics, here are the most rules violations with cleric mechanics I have seen:
1. Not understanding or pretending not to understand action vs bonus action with healing word/aid/cure wounds etc. There are specifics for each.

2. Not paying attention to which spells have Somatic components and trying to cast these while holding a weapon and shield. Also trying to cast a spell with both S and M without first setting up your shield to be a focus. Finally if players get off-class spells through a feat or have racial spells, not getting the material components for such or trying to use your holy symbol or shield as the material component.

3. Casting healing word and trying to follow it up with a spell as an action.

4. Trying to use spare the dying from range.

In terms of offensive spells, the Cleric is generally outclassed by every other full caster so I would not worry about that from a power/balance point of view. Tier 2 their best combo is probably spiritual weapon-Spirit Guardians-attack/cantrip. That is pretty decent damage, but it is not OP as it takes three turns to come fully online and spirit guardians rarely lasts long because it is concentration and you need to be near the front for it to be effective. People rave about spirit guardians but generally I think Faerie Fire (which is not generally available to clerics) is usually a higher payoff than Spirit guardiansby enhancing every attack the entire party makes on affected enemies and it does it with a much lower slot cost.

From a thematic point of view if you demand Clerics stay in their "healing box" few players are going to want to play clerics. 5E is pretty flexible, you don't need a healer in the party at all and forcing the cleric to play a healer is going to cause problems with a lot of players.
 
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ECMO3

Hero
Cantrips. Guidance is a monumental nuisance. Literally every action anyone takes...ever...the cleric will shout out "I cast guidance!" Better banned.

I have never had a problem with this, either as a player or as a DM.

I think RAW discussion on actions is appropriate here and should fix this. If a person says "I look for secret doors", then the cleric says "I cast guidance" that is fine they can both do it, but guidance is an action to cast, not a reaction, so out of initiative the check happens before the spell is cast. In initiative guidance can only be cast on the cleric's turn unless he readies an action to cast it or has warcaster and the person he wants to cast it on caused an AOO.

Also keep in mind it is concentration, so things like Hex, Hunters Mark, Pass Without Trace will drop if you cast it out of combat and in combat spirit guardians, moonbeam, faerie fire spike growth etc are going to drop when you cast it.

In one of the games I am playing now my Ranger has guidance. When I do something I will often say "I cast guidance and then look for a secret door" When it is other players occasionally they will ask for it before they try something and if they do I will either give it to them or remind them "I am concentrating on pass without trace". I will also mention it before we decide on something if we are planning that is going to require checks "I can cast guidance on everyone as they climb across the rickety rope bridge one-by-one and then I can cast it on myself and go last"
 
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Cadence

Legend
Supporter
Not sure what you mean by on the look out for.

If you are talking about mechanics, here are the most rules violations with cleric mechanics I have seen:
1. Not understanding or pretending not to understand action vs bonus action with healing word/aid/cure wounds etc. There are specifics for each.

2. Not paying attention to which spells have Somatic components and trying to cast these while holding a weapon and shield. Also trying to cast a spell with both S and M without first setting up your shield to be a focus. Finally if players get off-class spells through a feat or have racial spells, not getting the material components for such or trying to use your holy symbol or shield as the material component.

3. Casting healing word and trying to follow it up with a spell as an action.

4. Trying to use spare the dying from range.

In terms of offensive spells, the Cleric is generally outclassed by every other full caster so I would not worry about that from a power/balance point of view. Tier 2 their best combo is probably spiritual weapon-Spirit Guardians-attack/cantrip. That is pretty decent damage, but it is not OP as it takes three turns to come fully online and spirit guardians rarely lasts long because it is concentration and you need to be near the front for it to be effective. People rave about spirit guardians but generally I think Faerie Fire (which is not generally available to clerics) is usually a higher payoff than Spirit guardiansby enhancing every attack the entire party makes on affected enemies and it does it with a much lower slot cost.

From a thematic point of view if you demand Clerics stay in their "healing box" few players are going to want to play clerics. 5E is pretty flexible, you don't need a healer in the party at all and forcing the cleric to play a healer is going to cause problems with a lot of players.

Several of us in our group missed how bonus actions work with healing word for a while. :-/
 

overgeeked

B/X Known World
I have never had a problem with this, either as a player or as a DM.

I think RAW discussion on actions is appropriate here and should fix this. If a person says "I look for secret doors", then the cleric says "I cast guidance" that is fine they can both do it, but guidance is an action to cast, not a reaction, so out of initiative the check happens before the spell is cast. In initiative guidance can only be cast on the cleric's turn unless he readies an action to cast it or has warcaster and the person he wants to cast it on caused an AOO.

Also keep in mind it is concentration, so things like Hex, Hunters Mark, Pass Without Trace will drop if you cast it out of combat and in combat spirit guardians, moonbeam, faerie fire spike growth etc are going to drop when you cast it.

In one of the games I am playing now my Ranger has guidance. When I do something I will often say "I cast guidance and then look for a secret door" When it is other players occasionally they will ask for it before they try something and if they do I will either give it to them or remind them "I am concentrating on pass without trace". I will also mention it before we decide on something if we are planning that is going to require checks "I can cast guidance on everyone as they climb across the rickety rope bridge one-by-one and then I can cast it on myself and go last"
My issue is that it's spammed constantly. If it were a leveled spell like bless it would be fine. But as it's a cantrip, the casters with it will literally not let a single action in the game happen without trying to shoe-horn guidance in somehow. Doesn't matter how ridiculous. If any character in the game tries to perform any action at all..."I cast guidance!" No PC can do anything without guidance. You want to haggle and the cleric's not there, stop the game, go find the cleric, or bring the cleric with you...so you can get a +1d4 to your check. You want to pick a lock...stop the game, go find the cleric, so you can get a +1d4 to your check. Literally every action that has a roll..."I cast guidance!" It's not that a +1d4 is wildly overpowered, it's not really. But as a spammable cantrip, it's a bit much. It mostly comes down to players being ridiculous with it. It's more annoying than it's worth.

ETA: Wait. How long do you have searching for secret doors take? According to the PHB, it takes a minute to search for traps, and 10 minutes to search a chamber. Searching for a secret door would more than likely be on the high end of that scale (1-10 minutes).
 
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My issue is that it's spammed constantly. If it were a leveled spell like bless it would be fine. But as it's a cantrip, the casters with it will literally not let a single action in the game happen without trying to shoe-horn guidance in somehow. Doesn't matter how ridiculous. If any character in the game tries to perform any action at all..."I cast guidance!" No PC can do anything without guidance. You want to haggle and the cleric's not there, stop the game, go find the cleric, or bring the cleric with you...so you can get a +1d4 to your check. You want to pick a lock...stop the game, go find the cleric, so you can get a +1d4 to your check. Literally every action that has a roll..."I cast guidance!" It's not that a +1d4 is wildly overpowered, it's not really. But as a spammable cantrip, it's a bit much. It mostly comes down to players being ridiculous with it. It's more annoying than it's worth.
See I'm fine with the spamability, what's annoying is the spamability combined with a player who can never seem to remember the constraints of it being a one minute, touch spell that REQUIRES CONCENTRATION and AN ACTION TO CAST IN ADVANCE. I don't object to the occasional reasonable "oh I'm sorry my character would have given him Guidance for that", or the silliness of wanting to go get the Cleric before every important ability check, but I do object to when it becomes a DM burden to police because someone can't quite manage to track their own concentration or wants to constantly give retroactive Guidance whether or not the spell could feasibly have been cast.
 

Voadam

Legend
Not sure what you mean by on the look out for.
New Spells to be aware of. New Mechanics to be aware of from changes in spells. New cleric capabilities from how spells are different in 5e. New top picks for cleric spells. New consequences to be aware of from how cleric spells are different in 5e.

Spirit guardians is a 3rd level area of effect damage spell that lasts round to round for concentration.

In 1e AD&D a 3rd level cleric combat spell could cause a ranged single target save or be blinded (continual light). Most of the good 1e cleric 3rd level spells were cure effect spells or dispel magic or utility type speak with dead or create permanent light or create food.

In 3e clerics could also do a ranged single target save or blindness deafness, and also inflict serious wounds touch attack for 3d8+ caster level damage (+15 max), and searing light single target ranged touch attach for 1d8/2 caster levels 5d8 max. This was a shift to more immediate combat damage options including god lasers, but it was one shot single target spells.

5e's spirit guardians is a shift to ongoing area damage at 3rd level core cleric spells.

I have played a bunch of 5e with some people who have played a lot of older D&D and are not big into mechanics specifics so a lot of stuff has played similarly to prior editions. My current group has more people focused on effective leveraging of mechanics. The impact of the new to 5e spell spirit guardians caught me by surprise a bit when calibrating the challenge of different encounters and the types of effects I generally expect from different classes.
 


Watch out for Cure Wounds. The PCs will be back up with just a touch. Woooooooooooooooooooo.

On a serious note, when dealing with death and resurrection, I'd recommend finding out what the PCs have as potential afterlives/worshipped deities, because there might be fun opportunities to roleplay out cool scenes like a PC meeting an angel of their deity, or seeing their lost loved one, or getting devoured by their Great Old One patron.
 

ECMO3

Hero
My issue is that it's spammed constantly. If it were a leveled spell like bless it would be fine. But as it's a cantrip, the casters with it will literally not let a single action in the game happen without trying to shoe-horn guidance in somehow. Doesn't matter how ridiculous. If any character in the game tries to perform any action at all..."I cast guidance!"

Like I said this is RAW. It is not a reaction to cast, it is an action. They can NOT cast it when someone tries a check, that is against the rules.

It really is that simple if you just enforce the rules of the game, this particular abuse will end.


No PC can do anything without guidance. You want to haggle and the cleric's not there, stop the game, go find the cleric, or bring the cleric with you...so you can get a +1d4 to your check. You want to pick a lock...stop the game, go find the cleric, so you can get a +1d4 to your check. Literally every action that has a roll..."I cast guidance!" It's not that a +1d4 is wildly overpowered, it's not really. But as a spammable cantrip, it's a bit much. It mostly comes down to players being ridiculous with it. It's more annoying than it's worth.

I think the problem here is you are mostly not actually following the rules if you allow this:

1. Haggle: If a player is trying to haggle, but before haggling that player stops to talk to a friend, and that friend casts a spell with V and S components and does not use subtle spell metamagic, then the person you are trying to haggle with knows for a fact you just cast a spell (this is RAW). If he makes an intelligence check at a DC 15 he even knows that guidance specifically was cast (again this is RAW). Either way, the DC probably just went up a lot more than the 4 he can get from the benefit.

Tell the PC, the merchant gets a +10 on his insight because he realizes you are using magic to affect this deal, or maybe he just throws him out. Do that once or twice and this will stop. This is not the DM being mean, it is the rules of the game.

Now they can still cast it at the end of the road before they approach his merchant, but that is really not the spontaneous sort of check you are talking about but rather a planned encounter in that case and the PCs should be allowed to "buff" for it.

2. Pick a lock - if you are in a dungeon, unlocking a chest after killing the BBEG, well this is exactly what the spell is designed for. There is nothing wrong with this. If you are trying to pick the lock on a door to the princess' room without alerting the guards at the end of the hall, well this is impossible if you cast the spell unless you use subtle spell (again this is RAW).

Note many of the cases above require subtle spell. That means either a feat or a multiclass and makes it non-spammable.
 
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overgeeked

B/X Known World
Like I said this is RAW. It is not a reaction to cast, it is an action. They can NOT cast it when someone tries a check, that is against the rules.
No, it’s not. If a character tries something and the cleric shouts guidance, the character trying something stops, waits for guidance to be cast, then resumes their action.
It really is that simple if you just enforce the rules of the game, this particular abuse will end.
No, it doesn’t. You have to twist the game and not let the players have control over their characters to prevent it. Once or twice and suddenly everyone is constantly asking for guidance prior to trying things instead of the cleric shouting it out. It’s still annoying.
I think the problem here is you are mostly not actually following the rules if you allow this:

1. Haggle: If a player is trying to haggle, but before haggling that player stops to talk to a friend, and that friend casts a spell with V and S components and does not use subtle spell metamagic, then the person you are trying to haggle with knows for a fact you just cast a spell (this is RAW).
Two things. First, Xanathar’s is all optional content. It’s not RAW in the same sense as the PHB. Second, guidance is an action to cast with concentration of 1 minute. Cast it before you enter then negotiate. Negotiate for a minute or two, step outside, get another guidance, go back inside and negotiate some more. Overcoming the “roadblocks” you suggest are trivial.
If he makes an intelligence check at a DC 15 he even knows that guidance specifically was cast (again this is RAW). Either way, the DC probably just went up a lot more than the 4 he can get from the benefit.
Again, not RAW, optional rules presented in Xanathar’s. Also, it’s an Arcana check. And if there was ever an instance for proficient-only use of skills, identifying a specific spell being cast is it. Unless you think literally everyone in the entire world is so casually familiar with magic they can all…down to the youngest child…identify specific spells being cast just from the components on sight.

But you’re also skipping this line. “This Intelligence (Arcana) check represents the fact that identifying a spell requires a quick mind and familiarity with the theory and practice of casting.” So you’re giving everyone in your setting the Arcana skill for free if you let anyone and everyone ID spells on sight.
Tell the PC, the merchant gets a +10 on his insight because he realizes you are using magic to affect this deal, or maybe he just throws him out. Do that once or twice and this will stop. This is not the DM being mean, it is the rules of the game.
This is the DM making a call. Nowhere in the rules does it say anything about a +10 to Insight or tossing the character.
Now they can still cast it at the end of the road before they approach his merchant, but that is really not the spontaneous sort of check you are talking about but rather a planned encounter in that case and the PCs should be allowed to "buff" for it.
Not really. The entire game’s already stacked ridiculously in favor of the PCs just winning most things. They don’t need guidance on top of it.
2. Pick a lock - if you are in a dungeon, unlocking a chest after killing the BBEG, well this is exactly what the spell is designed for. There is nothing wrong with this. If you are trying to pick the lock on a door to the princess' room without alerting the guards at the end of the hall, well this is impossible if you cast the spell unless you use subtle spell (again this is RAW).
This is your interpretation of the rules, not RAW. There’s a difference. Verbal components don’t need to be screamed or shouted. And again, you’re conveniently forgetting that it’s a 1 minute concentration spell. Cast it before you’re in the hall with the guards.
Note many of the cases above require subtle spell. That means either a feat or a multiclass and makes it non-spammable.
No, they don’t. You just think they do. World of difference.

Again, it’s simpler to ban the most annoying spell in 5E rather than constantly rehash these tired old arguments. If you’d rather jump through all those hoops, knock yourself out.
 

Zubatcarteira

Now you're infected by the Musical Doodle
In my experience, it's more that the check is asked, they roll, fail, then ask for Guidance. If they're managing to shout it before anyone rolls, just let them, then the world can react to the weird dude casting spells on his friends every 30 seconds. It's also a cantrip, so very reasonable to be common knowledge, so people can know that they're doing.

For other spells to watch out for, they do get Scrying later, so with downtime they can be spamming that a lot, can be rough to keep the antagonist's actions hidden.

Planar Binding as well, especially upcast and with someone who can summon creatures, they can get quite an army.
 

jgsugden

Legend
I honestly think Guidance is not a balance issue, but an annoyance issue. I don't find that being able to spam a +d4 bonus to ability checks is all that powerful, but I do find that it is disruptive to storytelling to have the cleric suddenly stopping the action to say, "Can I cast guidance before the ability check?"

In my setting I have a mechanic for spells called "rune incantations". These are spells that have a duration of "until dispelled, dismissed as an action, or you become incapacitated", but when it is part of a leveled spell, you cannot regain the spell slot used to cast it while the spell is active. However, when a cantrip is a rune incantation, you can recast it at will. These have been used sparingly, but they have not been a problem when used. Examples of the cantrips:

  • Guiding Aura - All ability checks using a skill bonus performed by you or allies in a 10' radius are at +2.
  • Buffer - When you would take bludgeoning, piercing, and slashing damage dealt by a weapon attack less than or equal to 1 plus your proficiency bonus, take no damage instead.
  • Radiant Halo - A bright halo of light comes into existance above your head. It shines bright light in a 20 foot radius, and dim light in a 40 foot radius.
  • Rune Weapon - A nonmagical weapon becomes magical and gains a +1 to the damage it deals.
  • Float - You float 3 inches above solid ground (but sink into liquids). Your movement speed is not effected.
  • Simple Homonculous - A 1 foot tall create (there is a stat block) comes into existence and follows you around. You may use an action to give it a command. If it is given no commands, during a round it attempts to move within 30 feet of you (and does nothing else). This spell has a casting time of 10 minutes, and also ends if the creature (which has 1 hp) is destroyed or moves more than 60 feet away from you.
 

Jacob Lewis

Ye Olde GM
2nd. Prayer of Healing takes 10 minutes to cast. My cleric players really seem to think it's 1 action.
There was one campaign I joined with my players from another game where I got to play a very melancholy and overly-dramatic dwarf cleric of Jergal. (He was based off the dwarf cleric npc in Pathfinder-Kingmaker CRPG.) I played him for comic effect, but everyone had fun with him.

Anyway, I specifically took this spell because of the 10 minute casting time. Nobody wanted to give him the time of day, much less listen to his doom-n-gloom sermons. After a rough battle, everyone was pretty beat up. I offered a healing for the group if they could around him. They did. And he started into his 10 minute sermon/ verbal somantic. It was going to be a literal 10 minutes of me talking in character, in real time.

All the players took the cue and had their characters leave almost immediately, willing to deal with their wounds on their own than having to listen to the dwarf.
 

ECMO3

Hero
No, it’s not. If a character tries something and the cleric shouts guidance, the character trying something stops, waits for guidance to be cast, then resumes their action.

No, it doesn’t. You have to twist the game and not let the players have control over their characters to prevent it. Once or twice and suddenly everyone is constantly asking for guidance prior to trying things instead of the cleric shouting it out. It’s still annoying.

If a player says "I sneak down the hallway" then that is what he is doing. If the cleric's player says I run up and grab his shoulder then that too happens. If it is worded a little differently "Guys I can sneak down the hallway....sure I will cast guidance" that is fundamentally different.

If you are letting your cleric change what another character is doing by shouting "I cast guidance" before he does it you are actually taking control AWAY from the first player.

Let you players tell you what their characters are doing and then let them face the ramifications for such. Also as DM you call for checks instead of letting them roll checks automatically.




Two things. First, Xanathar’s is all optional content. It’s not RAW in the same sense as the PHB. Second, guidance is an action to cast with concentration of 1 minute. Cast it before you enter then negotiate. Negotiate for a minute or two, step outside, get another guidance, go back inside and negotiate some more. Overcoming the “roadblocks” you suggest are trivial.

No it only lasts 1 minute, not 2 minutes. You need to cast it in the middle of the negotiation to keep it up for more than a minute. You would need to use extend spell metamagic (when you cast it) to get 2 minutes out of it.

So you cast it out of sight/sound of the merchant, then you walk up to him and you probably have about 40 seconds left before the spell ends.


Again, not RAW, optional rules presented in Xanathar’s. Also, it’s an Arcana check. And if there was ever an instance for proficient-only use of skills, identifying a specific spell being cast is it. Unless you think literally everyone in the entire world is so casually familiar with magic they can all…down to the youngest child…identify specific spells being cast just from the components on sight.

It is an Intelligence (Arcana) check, which means it is intelligence if the person in question is not proficient. It is a DC 15, which makes it probably about as hard as hitting a baseball thrown by a 13 year old.

Any proficiency requirement is typically due to a DC that would be impossible without it and 15 is not high enough to be that. For example if it was a 26 DC it would be impossible without proficiency. There is no rules (optional or not) that I am aware of that state only someone proficient can attempt a skill check.

So yes according to the [optional] rules anyone can attempt to identify the spell down to the smallest child. If you want to homebrew that then fine, but that is homebrew.

Further identifying the spell is not nearly as big a deal as knowing someone just cast a spell.



But you’re also skipping this line. “This Intelligence (Arcana) check represents the fact that identifying a spell requires a quick mind and familiarity with the theory and practice of casting.” So you’re giving everyone in your setting the Arcana skill for free if you let anyone and everyone ID spells on sight.
No that is why it is a DC check. That is what the 15 to identify the spell, but there is no check to identify someone is casting a spell. Being practiced at casting spells gives you advantage on the check (if it is from your spell list), so casters are more likely to succeed, but the basic knowledge comes from your intelligence score (and proficiency if you have it).

Magic is a like a helicopter, everyone knows what it is and knows it when they see it. Identifying a spell is like identifying a helicopter when it quickly flys by overhead. Few are going to be able to know that unless they have knowledge of such things. That knowledge could be from general knowledge (intelligence) or it could be from specific knowledge like if he is a Pilot, Engineer or Soldier (proficiency), but everyone can look up and see if he knows what kind of helicopter it is.


This is the DM making a call. Nowhere in the rules does it say anything about a +10 to Insight or tossing the character.

Absolutely it is. It is role playing the merchant who just witnessed someone cast a spell on himself before the negotiation started.

Do whatever you think is reasonable as the DM, but doing nothing is hardly reasonable. Maybe he responds with a counterspell or dispel magic instead. Maybe he does nothing.


This is your interpretation of the rules, not RAW. There’s a difference. Verbal components don’t need to be screamed or shouted. And again, you’re conveniently forgetting that it’s a 1 minute concentration spell. Cast it before you’re in the hall with the guards.

According to the rules designer casting a spell gives away your location if hidden unless you use subtle spell. Further according to him, verbal components must be loud enough to be heard (unless you use subtle spell).

No, they don’t. You just think they do. World of difference.

Yes they do. That is what the subtle spell metamagic is intended for and if you are letting characters cast without being noticed all the time then you are nerfing that metamagic and greatly increasing the propensity to use spells in social situations.
 
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Exactly, the fights were scattered, we were having to drop the spell to arrive in a timely manner.
In one campaign, a player commissioned a Holy Mitten that let them hold the Spiritual Weapon as they moved around. They could only attack with it using a bonus action as normal, but they could hold it and run around with it at their normal speed.
 


To be fair, hearing the word "Guidance" so often has an eye twitching quality of its own. But there are some constructive ways to handle that, like giving the guiding player a Harry Potter wand and letting them wave it around at players frantically whenever they want to use it. :ROFLMAO:
 

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