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5E Baldur's Gate 3 AMA

I'm with you on this one! People keep defending it like it's normal, but I've played a lot of CRPGs and I've never encountered this narration style before. I also find it weird and off-putting. I know they probably won't, but I hope they change it.
I've not seen it done before in a crpg, but I can see why it might be done that way and I'm not prepared to knee-jerk condemn it out of hand.

Game developers need to be encouraged to try different things, not trot out the same old same old.
 

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pukunui

Hero
I've not seen it done before in a crpg, but I can see why it might be done that way and I'm not prepared to knee-jerk condemn it out of hand.

Game developers need to be encouraged to try different things, not trot out the same old same old.
So why are you telling me I shouldn’t write my recaps in present tense? It’s different and, in my opinion, makes them read better. My players love them, and that’s all that matters to me.
 

fearsomepirate

Adventurer
Nope.

The DM voice (Kevin Michael Richardson, who also voices the main antagonist) narrates dream sequences and cut scenes in 2nd person present tense.

"You do not dream often, but tonight the visions are vivid, indeed. Long have you walked, but now you find yourself back amid the stones of Candlekeep. Your former home looms before you, but the gate is closed and barred. Over the walls, there is a candle in your old room, but as the light goes out, the brick surrounding the window closes together. The very walls conspire to keep you at bay."

Apart from a few combat grunts and selection responses the protagonist of BG1 and 2 has no voice.

then i guess the game is ruined
 



Well, then you should be able to empathize with me, since the past tense dialogue options in this game seem very odd to me.
It seem odd to me too. But "it seems odd" isn't a good reason to cry "doom" before knowing the context and seeing it work in practice.

Some CRPGs use icons for dialogue selection - click on the heart to say something nice etc. The dialogue selection menu isn't what you see and hear on screen - if it is, you have a repetition problem.

The original BG didn't have that issue, since it came from a time before the expectation of fully voiced protagonists, so the text you selected in the dialogue menu was exactly what your character says, and it wasn't repeated by some voice actor.
 

pukunui

Hero
It seem odd to me too. But "it seems odd" isn't a good reason to cry "doom" before knowing the context and seeing it work in practice.
I haven't been crying doom! Just complaining. There's a big difference.

I've just splurged out on an expensive new gaming computer so I can play this game (among others -- and also do graphic design more speedily than on my current machine).

I have to say, I've never played any CRPGs with icons for dialogue selection. Nor, to be perfectly honest, have I played any that I can remember that had fully voiced PCs. I'm used to games like Dragon Age: Origins and Neverwinter Nights and the like, where you just choose text and then the NPC continues talking but your own PC doesn't make any noise.
 

I have to say, I've never played any CRPGs with icons for dialogue selection.
Elder Scrolls: Morrowind is probably the best of those.
Nor, to be perfectly honest, have I played any that I can remember that had fully voiced PCs. I'm used to games like Dragon Age: Origins and Neverwinter Nights and the like, where you just choose text and then the NPC continues talking but your own PC doesn't make any noise.
I'm afraid fully voiced protagonists are industry standard these days. DA:O (10 years old now) was probably the last mainstream game not to have it. It would be a massive risk to do away with that for a mainstream game. (games like Pathfinder: Kingmaker are considered niche and don't make the big sales numbers). I'm not a huge fan myself, because of the repetition issue, and because I can read much faster than English is spoken. But if they want the big sales they pretty much have to have it.
 

Mirtek

Adventurer
Minsc and Boo are around, Viconia should be around, Edwin could be around, Coran is around, Aerie is around. Xan should be around, Jan should be around, Kivan should be around.

A fair number of characters could show up.
Actually the majority has been killed off in the official novels telling the canon version of how things went down. Now they could be ressurected though
 

pukunui

Hero
Elder Scrolls: Morrowind is probably the best of those.
Never got into Elder Scrolls. Haven’t played Skyrim.

I'm afraid fully voiced protagonists are industry standard these days. DA:O (10 years old now) was probably the last mainstream game not to have it. It would be a massive risk to do away with that for a mainstream game. (games like Pathfinder: Kingmaker are considered niche and don't make the big sales numbers). I'm not a huge fan myself, because of the repetition issue, and because I can read much faster than English is spoken. But if they want the big sales they pretty much have to have it.
I prefer to read myself. Can PC voices be turned off in these modern games?
 

Never got into Elder Scrolls. Haven’t played Skyrim.
I think Skyrim took a more conventional approach to dialogue. I haven't played ES much myself - I've always found them lacking in characterisation.
I prefer to read myself. Can PC voices be turned off in these modern games?
You can usually turn on subtitles then hit a "skip" button once you have read them to go to the next line of dialogue, but you can't turn the VO off, no. Characters tend to have an awful lot to say for themselves (not to mention actions: [walks to bookshelf, takes book of shelf and flicks through it]), even if it amounts to "Yes, I'll save the princess from the tower".
 
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MarkB

Legend
I think Skyrim took a more conventional approach to dialogue. I haven't played ES much myself - I've always found them lacking in characterisation.
Most Bethesda RPGs have had largely silent protagonists. Fallout 4 (which came out some time after Skyrim) was controversial for featuring a voiced protagonist.
 

Sabathius42

Bree-Yark
Why do you think that is?

Even though it isn't my preferred playstyle I think I understand why people like it when the DM picks treasure to place in D&D.

For a videogame to have the same and specific treasure though seems like a missed opportunity to have varied challenges.
Way back in the day when playing Pool of Radiance, when you killed 6 kobolds you knew you were going to find 6 shortswords, 6 sets of leather, 6 bucklers, and some pocket change. The treasure made sense for the creatures carrying it.

In modern videogame design you kill a giant wolf and find a magic crossbow.

I'll stick with the seeded treasures with some randomization for things like crates and barrels and similar.
 

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