D&D 5E [+] Converting WFRP to 5e

TheSword

Legend
I'm currently running the Horned Rat. I am not trying to poo on this idea, but WFRP is so simple a system why not just use that. I think you are going to really really over complicate things using 5e. WFRP and Empire in Ruins is a perfect match.

If you want to play 5e for this have at it, but the Enemy WIthin "remaster" is just so smooth. I am having a blast running this, and I think if I was to do this in 5e I'd really be having problems.

I love complexity and though WFRP is simple, it really covers its bases for the "3 pillars" extremely well, and that exploration and investigation abilities are going to be really important for this campaign. WFRP makes it that any character can really contribute to the investigation. I think you have to re-engineer 5e a bit to make some classes contribute well.
Interestingly I’m working on converting Ubersreik Adventures 1 & 2 and the starter set to 5e to teach my partner, my brother and his wife to play 5e. I’ve only really started on maps and tokens but about to start working on NPCs. I need to get my head around reduced encounter number days. That seems to be the toughest stumbling block for now.

As for WFRP 4e, we’re about 6 sessions into Enemy Within and I’ve dropped in The Oldenhaller Contract. I wouldn’t say it is simple, but I’m finding it very enjoyable.
 

log in or register to remove this ad

Mournblade94

Adventurer
Interestingly I’m working on converting Ubersreik Adventures 1 & 2 and the starter set to 5e to teach my partner, my brother and his wife to play 5e. I’ve only really started on maps and tokens but about to start working on NPCs. I need to get my head around reduced encounter number days. That seems to be the toughest stumbling block for now.

As for WFRP 4e, we’re about 6 sessions into Enemy Within and I’ve dropped in The Oldenhaller Contract. I wouldn’t say it is simple, but I’m finding it very enjoyable.
Yes! I did the Oldenhaller contract as an early adventure. You will meet an Oldenhaller later but it doesn't reference the adventure. I think in Middenheim part 3.

I weaved the parties past deeds into that section but there's no guidance. So make note of what they do and you can bring it up in power behind the throne if you like.
 

Mournblade94

Adventurer
Your experience and mine are completely different. WFRP 4e is probably the most complicated system I've played in the modern era (post-2000).
Why do you find it so? It clicked with me very quickly.

Actually come to think of it there are alot of ambiguities you just kind of figure out. For example the fact lots of talents add success levels but it's not always clear what talent adds to what skill.
 

Retreater

Legend
Why do you find it so? It clicked with me very quickly.
This is just my take (and two different tables of gamers):
1) Advantage is a beast to keep track of.
2) There's a plethora of conditions, with stacking bonuses, penalties, and effects.
3) Character creation is very nitpicking and the preferred method of creation (random rolling for a pittance of XP) is a beginner's trap.
4) Resolve, Resilience, Fate, Fortune are easy to mix up.
5) Success Levels, Opposed Checks, is a pretty tricky concept to get the hang of.
6) Hit locations, toughness, armour to factor into Wound damage.
7) Character advancement, bean counting and insignificant character growth, and confusing ways to increase ability
8) Coin conversation rates are funky for Americans (maybe it's ok in England?); Even the way prices are written don't make sense
 

TheSword

Legend
This is just my take (and two different tables of gamers):
1) Advantage is a beast to keep track of.
2) There's a plethora of conditions, with stacking bonuses, penalties, and effects.
3) Character creation is very nitpicking and the preferred method of creation (random rolling for a pittance of XP) is a beginner's trap.
4) Resolve, Resilience, Fate, Fortune are easy to mix up.
5) Success Levels, Opposed Checks, is a pretty tricky concept to get the hang of.
6) Hit locations, toughness, armour to factor into Wound damage.
7) Character advancement, bean counting and insignificant character growth, and confusing ways to increase ability
8) Coin conversation rates are funky for Americans (maybe it's ok in England?); Even the way prices are written don't make sense
Check out the new group advantage released in Up in Arms.
 

Retreater

Legend
Check out the new group advantage released in Up in Arms.
As an improvement? Or something new to add to my list? Haha
That might come in handy if I come back to WFRP, but we're taking a break from it for the time being. I need something a little more straightforward than WFRP (and TEW).
 

TheSword

Legend
As an improvement? Or something new to add to my list? Haha
That might come in handy if I come back to WFRP, but we're taking a break from it for the time being. I need something a little more straightforward than WFRP (and TEW).
Lol. Instead of having individual advantage tracking you have points that each side build up. Any person on that side can then spend those points, instead of them accumulating into an unstoppable wave.
 

Ancalagon

Dusty Dragon
This is just my take (and two different tables of gamers):
1) Advantage is a beast to keep track of.
2) There's a plethora of conditions, with stacking bonuses, penalties, and effects.
3) Character creation is very nitpicking and the preferred method of creation (random rolling for a pittance of XP) is a beginner's trap.
4) Resolve, Resilience, Fate, Fortune are easy to mix up.
5) Success Levels, Opposed Checks, is a pretty tricky concept to get the hang of.
6) Hit locations, toughness, armour to factor into Wound damage.
7) Character advancement, bean counting and insignificant character growth, and confusing ways to increase ability
8) Coin conversation rates are funky for Americans (maybe it's ok in England?); Even the way prices are written don't make sense
warhammer definitely has quirks that can be hard to master (... just think about the 5e rules for casting spells with bonus actions and all the resulting permutations), but I suspect you would have a better experience with warhammer 2nd edition.
 

eyeheartawk

#1 Enworld Jerk™
Your experience and mine are completely different. WFRP 4e is probably the most complicated system I've played in the modern era (post-2000).
There' some stuff I like about it, and some I don't. If you know 1st or 2nd edition, I'm not sure that learning all this new stuff is worth the effort. I think I'd rather just keep playing either of those editions.
Interestingly I’m working on converting Ubersreik Adventures 1 & 2 and the starter set to 5e to teach my partner, my brother and his wife to play 5e. I’ve only really started on maps and tokens but about to start working on NPCs. I need to get my head around reduced encounter number days. That seems to be the toughest stumbling block for now.

As for WFRP 4e, we’re about 6 sessions into Enemy Within and I’ve dropped in The Oldenhaller Contract. I wouldn’t say it is simple, but I’m finding it very enjoyable.
The Oldenhaller Contract is my favorite intro adventure to any roleplaying game of all time.
 

Level Up!

An Advertisement

Advertisement4

Top