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Critical Role Could Critical Role launch their own RPG?


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There is some parallel with creating the animated show though.

They aren't actually creating the animated show. They are hiring folks to do all the animation and actual production, even if they are providing the voices.

Could they not do the same thing to design an RPG? Hire some of the bigger names in game design to build a CR RPG? Who says that they have to be the designers.

Heck, it's not like everyone at WotC is a designer.
Sure.
But what's the benefit?

They'd lose their D&D Beyond sponsorship. And the players would have to learn new rules and remake their characters.
Yeah, it would make them some money from Critters. But they're already doing that with art books, dice, pencils, T-shirts, hoodies, press on nails, miniatures, comic books, and now a cartoon.

It would cost them a lot of money (paying someone to design and test a game for a year or two) for a very moderate return on investment. While they're huge, they'd be competing with a known name, and not all of their fans would change editions. Because, while Critical Role has brought a lot of gamers into the community, not every member of a D&D group is likely to be a critter. Getting a group to swap RPG systems is a tricky business.
Such a product would be likely to sell well, but unlikely to make much inroads into play.

Because, while...
One rather hopes the rising tide and all that.
Roll20's numbers of games being played have shown that D&D is growing rapidly, but most other RPGs are only increasing at a trickle, if at all. There's a lot of new gamers being added to tabletop RPGs but most haven't started spreading out into other systems yet.

A Critical Role RPG would be a "shelf game". A product you buy to read and then just sits on your gaming shelf...
 

I haven't observed this happening, but it doesn't surprise me. The prevailing attitude in certain corners of the Internet is that the success of others is a threat to your own.

But what I can tell you is this: Last week, at the top of their show, Matt Mercer urged his fans to support other projects.
Matt Mercer's comments to that effect were partially the result of some people getting upset at their success.
There's a lot of growing criticism of Critical Role:

https://www.polygon.com/2019/3/11/18256668/critical-role-kickstarter-animated

But, really, this is just because it's successful. And some people are always going to be jealous and angry when other people find success, and lots of people want to see things fail. They want to see the big name creators stumble and fail, because that completes the narrative.
 

robus

Lowcountry Low Roller
Supporter
But, really, this is just because it's successful. And some people are always going to be jealous and angry when other people find success, and lots of people want to see things fail. They want to see the big name creators stumble and fail, because that completes the narrative.

Hmm - that gives me a show idea for them: Critical Boost. Once a month have the cast talk about geek culture things they're excited about. Whether it's a new game, animated show, or a new kickstarter or book or whatever. Basically share their enthusiasm for the wider geek culture (and give a signal boost to deserving things).
 


Dessert Nomad

Adventurer
The plan seems like a way to spend a lot of effort to turn a popular, money making show that they really enjoy being a part of into a less-popular show that makes less money and involves more work that they don't like, but allows them to say they're playing their own game instead of D&D. I really don't see why they'd opt to put in the effort to go from a large fortune to a small fortune, it just doesn't make sense on any level.
 

CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing (He/They)
Matt Mercer's comments to that effect were partially the result of some people getting upset at their success.
There's a lot of growing criticism of Critical Role:

https://www.polygon.com/2019/3/11/18256668/critical-role-kickstarter-animated

But, really, this is just because it's successful. And some people are always going to be jealous and angry when other people find success, and lots of people want to see things fail. They want to see the big name creators stumble and fail, because that completes the narrative.
I don't think they are supporting others in response to criticism. Matt Mercer has been plugging #FundDiverseGames on Twitter months before the Kickstarter went live, and the Critical Role show has been raising money for local charities for years.

Don't get me wrong, I don't believe Critical Role should be above criticism...I don't think any public figure should be. And between you and me? I'm okay with it. If online criticism truly does motivate Critical Role to do even more great things for worthy causes, then let's pile it on.
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
The plan seems like a way to spend a lot of effort to turn a popular, money making show that they really enjoy being a part of into a less-popular show that makes less money and involves more work that they don't like, but allows them to say they're playing their own game instead of D&D. I really don't see why they'd opt to put in the effort to go from a large fortune to a small fortune, it just doesn't make sense on any level.

Nothing lasts forever. Start future-proofing early. And an RPG book isn't that big a hurdle.
 

robus

Lowcountry Low Roller
Supporter
Don't get me wrong, I don't believe Critical Role should be above criticism...I don't think any public figure should be. And between you and me? I'm okay with it. If online criticism truly does motivate Critical Role to do even more great things for worthy causes, then let's pile it on.

Well let’s avoid a pile on! Constructive criticism is great, but just endless moaning that they haven’t supported this or that pet project is just going to end badly. It’s way too easy to form social media hit squads!

These appear to be good people dealing with unexpected success and visibility, let’s not be an angry mob making unreasonable demands.
 

CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing (He/They)
Hmm - that gives me a show idea for them: Critical Boost. Once a month have the cast talk about geek culture things they're excited about. Whether it's a new game, animated show, or a new kickstarter or book or whatever. Basically share their enthusiasm for the wider geek culture (and give a signal boost to deserving things).
It wouldn't even need to be a separate show. It could be a one-minute plug at the top of the show, right after Sam's "D&D Beyond" bit and Laura's merchandise update. Maybe Liam or Taliesin could spend just a minute talking about one or two projects from the FundDiverseGames hashtag or something. "This week, I'd like to boost the signal for Tiny RPG Project," Taliesin might say. "Their Kickstarter just went live, and it's a wonderful little game written by a small group of awesome folks in Kansas. Let's get the word out with hashtag Tiny RPG Project, everyone...let's help them get off the ground."

Hm. On second thought...

I can already hear the internet comment section howling with outrage. "Oh sure, Tiny RPG Project...how much money did you have to give Critical Role to get them to say that? You guys are such sell-outs. And those guys in Kansas are roommates with the uncle of the cousin of the former paperboy of a wealthy oil baron, so they already have enough money" and so on, right down the toilet. And no matter which project they announce, it would be the wrong choice according to 99% of the Internet and would alienate more than it would unite. It's sad, but we really do eat our own.

Maybe social media and hashtags is the best approach after all? I'm not really sure. I'm an engineer, not a promoter or publicist.
 
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