D&D and the rising pandemic


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Zardnaar

Legend
What's that fancy term for people who think they're a lot smarter than they are? Dunning whatever.

A lot of conspiracy theorys are people thinking they're smarter than most because they're in on "the truth".

I've met a Holocaust denier, flat earther and a 9/11 that were otherwise intelligent people. The flat earther was quite funny as he also believed Mesa were fossilized ancient tree stumps.
He was also very good at a lot of life skills, and with his hands.he was a qualified cable installer in construction and maintained power tools and could reassemble almost anything. Also knew his way around a garden and seemed to be a bit of a prepper.
 

Eltab

Lord of the Hidden Layer
Yah.

So, we have had a statistical weirdness related to Covid-19. As you'd imagine, overall traffic volume is down. However, at least in my town, traffic accidents are up. Apparently, those idiots who are on the road are saying, 'Gee, the road's empty! I can go as fast as I want!' and they then smash into other cars and people, because they forget silly things like physics don't shut down during a pandemic.
Over the weekend I saw an article that CHiPs (CA Highway Patrol) has handed out twice as many tickets for driving 100+ MPH as usual. (Simultaneously, total tickets written is down.) I'm waiting to hear that somebody got pulled over for speeding and his speakers were blasting "I - CAN'T - DRIVE - 55 !"
 

Some conspiracy theories make sense. The labratory theory is a huuuuuuge stretch (and not true) but it's not outside the bounds of logic. But the G5 theory is just dumb and makes zero sense.
Ignoring the fact those frequencies have been used before and that micorwaves at those frequencies are non-ionizing and don't affect living tissue... 5G isn't worldwide. There's no 5G in Canada, but 63,000 cases of Covid-19.
Correlation doesn't equal causation... especially when there's not even any correlation.

Anyhoo, happy to hear some people are out of lockdown. Still ongoing here in Alberta but is mostly under control. A few more weeks.
Not that it matters to me. Schools are still closed for the year, so I'm laid off until September when they open up. It's going to be a looooong four months.
 


Levistus's_Leviathan

5e Freelancer
The city I live in in Washington has more cases than any other region in my state, because people aren't following stay at home orders. Then people justify the deaths by saying, "It's okay, they were old or had pre-existing health conditions". My town is filled with terrible people who are essentially killing people.
 


Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
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Mikeythorn

Explorer
The main thing that will help us be able to open back up is testing. We need more testing. There's a great new video by John Oliver on youtube on this subject, and why it's key that we get more testing if we want to save the economy.
Here in New Zealand the government’s position has been that three things are vital: testing; quarantine of those who test positive and close contacts; and rapid contact tracing. I am wondering how well contact tracing is going in countries with large numbers (eg over 100,000) of cases? Can anyone in one of those countries comment? I have a background in public health, and have done contact tracing myself in the past, and it is massively time-consuming.
 


Olrox17

Hero
Yah.

So, we have had a statistical weirdness related to Covid-19. As you'd imagine, overall traffic volume is down. However, at least in my town, traffic accidents are up. Apparently, those idiots who are on the road are saying, 'Gee, the road's empty! I can go as fast as I want!' and they then smash into other cars and people, because they forget silly things like physics don't shut down during a pandemic.
That’s insane. Here in Rome, ironically enough, overall deaths are 9% LOWER than last year. Why? First, covid 19 hasn’t hit Rome hard, so that’s not a factor. Second, no traffic accidents, which makes a big, big difference.
 







NotAYakk

Legend
I can't understand anyone who thinks that old people should have less a right to live.
So there is something called QLY -- quality of life years.

The idea is that if a medical intervention would generate 1 year of bedridden life on average, it is worth 0.9 QLY. If another medical intervention would generate an average of 60 years of fully mobile and 20 years of bedrest, it is worth 78 QLY.

This is used to pick where the medical system should throw resources. If someone is dying of 7 different things, and curing one means they die on average 1 month later, and they spend that month in a coma, should we do that intervention or should we cure the cancer in the 14 year old, whose prognosis is a 95% of a full lifespan with no side effects?

The easy answer is "do both", but resources are limited (and often represented by money). At some level you have to decide between them.

This leads to deciding that the age and health of the person does change the cost:benefit analysis of the medical intervention; or, in less abstract terms, that we "value the life" of an old person less.

What happens when you apply this rule to compare health care resources to non-health-care resources? How much GDP loss is saving X lives worth? X million dollars? X billion dollars? X trillion dollars?
 

NotAYakk

Legend

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