Here's The Official Wildemount Announcement!

After the various leaks over the weekend from Amazon and Barnes & Noble, the official announcement has just dropped! It's a different description to the one on Amazon, and contains a little bit more information about the contents of the upcoming setting book, which includes four introductory adventures!

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Create your own Critical Role campaigns with this sourcebook for the world's greatest roleplaying game!

Explorer’s Guide to Wildemount
provides everything you need to play Dungeons & Dragons on the continent of Wildemount (set within the world of Exandria)—a land of war, betrayal, and swashbuckling adventure.

Comprised of four regions, Wildemount provides endless potential for adventure in a land of brewing conflict and incredible magic. Rising tensions boil over into all-out war between the politically dubious Dwendalian Empire and the light-worshiping wastefolk of Xhorhas, supplying a vibrant backdrop for any D&D campaign to explore.
  • Uncover a trove of new options usable in any D&D game, featuring subclasses, spells, magic items, monsters, and more, rooted in the adventures of Critical Role—such as Vestiges of Divergence and the possibility manipulating magic of dunamancy.
  • Start a campaign in any of Wildemount’s regions using a variety of introductory adventures, dozens of regional plot seeds, and the heroic chronicle system—a way to create character backstories rooted in Wildemount.
  • Explore every corner of Wildemount and discover mysteries revealed for the first time by Critical Role Dungeon Master, Matthew Mercer.
WHERE CAN I BUY IT?
Pre-order at your local game store, book stores such as Barnes & Noble, or online at retailers like Amazon.

ITEM DETAILS
Price: $49.95
Release Date: 17 March, 2020
This book’s contents include the following:
  • An expansive Wildemount gazetteer.
  • Descriptions of the major factions of Wildemount.
  • Player options that include new subclasses, new spells, and a tool to help players deeply integrate their characters into the setting.
  • New magic items, including weapons that become more powerful to match their wielders.
  • New creatures native to Wildemount.
  • Four introductory adventures—one for each unique region of Wildemount.
Largely written and helmed by Matthew Mercer, the Dungeon Master of Critical Role and creator of the world of Exandria, this 304-page book features work by talented designers, writers, and artists from the D&D and Critical Role communities.
Explorer's Guide to Wildemount is an expansive, vivid campaign setting anyone can enjoy regardless of their familiarity with Critical Role, and an open invitation to make the mysteries and dangers of Wildemount your own.

--

This also dropped in my inbox, with a couple of quotes from those involved, such as Matt Mercer and WotC's Nathan Stewart:

RENTON, WA – January 13, 2020 – When Critical Role debuted in March 2015, no one predicted the success of a Dungeons & Dragons liveplay show starring prominent voice actors. Not only has the show inspired a vast fan community of “Critters” to create fan art, cosplay, and even musicals based on Critical Role’s adventures, but the stories crafted by Matthew Mercer and his friends have encouraged droves of new players to try D&D for the first time. The D&D Team at Wizards of the Coast is excited to officially collaborate with Mercer by publishing a brand new tabletop roleplaying book detailing the continent explored in the second campaign ofCritical Role, complete with player options such as subclasses, magic items, and more. Explorer’s Guide to Wildemount will be available in stores everywhere on March 17, 2020!

Critical Role is a great example of why Dungeons & Dragons has been popular for over 45 years: a group of friends getting together, telling stories, and making each other laugh. In this case, the friends are talented performers playing live on camera, but the fun’s the same. We’re thrilled D&D fans and Critters alike can now enjoy playing in Matt’s world, as brought to fifth edition in this lovingly-crafted book,” said Nathan Stewart, VP of Franchise for Dungeons & Dragons.

“I'm sincerely so honored and excited to be working directly with Chris Perkins and this team of talented D&D writers and designers to bring this book to not just our community, but to D&D players everywhere,” said Matthew Mercer, Chief Creative Officer and Dungeon Master of Critical Role, as well as lead writer on the guide. “Dungeons & Dragons has had such a massive, positive impact on nearly my entire life, and I am ever inspired by the endless creativity I see it spark in so many others across the world. To have been able to work with Wizards of the Coast to bring my world to life as an official campaign book is nothing short of surreal. I can't wait to see what other DMs and players create within my world to make it their own!”

The 304-page Explorer’s Guide to Wildemount invites DMs to start playing in any of Wildemount’s regions using introductory adventures, dozens of story-inspiring plot seeds, and the new heroic chronicle system. Adventurers can also expect to discover countless secrets revealed by Critical Role Dungeon Master Matthew Mercer for the first time. Players and DMs will find new character options available for play in any campaign, like the Echo Knight fighter subclass, spells of dunamancy, numerous new monsters, and more!
 
Last edited:
Russ Morrissey

Comments

This.

I've read a few people talk about how they want Spelljammer, Dark Sun, etc. to be re-released for 5th Edition. And I know that WotC has said they would entertain these campaign settings, I doubt they will ever release more than the campaign sourcebook. I mean, even if we do manage to get Planescape 5E, we probably won't see full updated releases of "A Guide to the Astral Plane," "Uncaged: Faces of Sigil", "The Eternal Bounty", "Well of Worlds," "In the Abyss," etc.

But I've been wrong before. We should watch what happens with Eberron.
Regarding the Planescape books mentioned above, I bought most of them off DMsGuild in either PoD or PDF and there's very little there that needs converting. You can even buy a conversion of the Planescape monsters on DMsGuild. You want to play Planescape in 5e? There's very little stopping you. Most of the Planescape specific 2e rules mechanics are not needed in 5e; the 5e DMG takes care of things - I've chucked all the irrelevant 2e rules out the metaphorical window (or portal). The only thing that could use an update is rules for the factions but I'm personally not too bothered.

I'm pretty happy with my 5e Planescape; I already have the (new) books.
 

Parmandur

Legend
I figure selling campaign setting is like selling drugs in a TV shows, once they've had their first hit of a campaign setting, it will be easier and easier to get them to buy more campaign settings, like someone buying their first deck of Magic the Crackening.

Given that this book is already so successful, I wonder if it might get an MtG set eventually as well.
I think with Guildmasters Guide to Ravnica, they cracked the code for how to make a Setting product that works for fans of the Setting, and people who don't want to play in the Setting itself.
 

Demetrios1453

Adventurer
Regarding the Planescape books mentioned above, I bought most of them off DMsGuild in either PoD or PDF and there's very little there that needs converting. You can even buy a conversion of the Planescape monsters on DMsGuild. You want to play Planescape in 5e? There's very little stopping you. Most of the Planescape specific 2e rules mechanics are not needed in 5e; the 5e DMG takes care of things - I've chucked all the irrelevant 2e rules out the metaphorical window (or portal). The only thing that could use an update is rules for the factions but I'm personally not too bothered.

I'm pretty happy with my 5e Planescape; I already have the (new) books.
Heck, one of the best conversions of non-updated planar creatures was started right here and then ported over to the DMs Guild, the Planar Bestiary.

But, I can't see them not eventually doing a full conversion - the setting just fits too well with their now-established setting book format. Overview, setting specific classes and races, (planar) geography, major focus on important city (this case Sigil), Factions (of which Planescape's are the codifiers for the game), magic items, bestiary. It almost writes itself! And as the Great Wheel Outer Planes are back to being the default, it still will have lots of use for people not directly interested in the setting...
 

Mournblade94

Adventurer
So, after "Acquisitions Inc" and "Rick & Morty vs D&D" were published, it was no longer possible to have non-silly games?

D&D has a long history of silliness in places like Dragon Magazine and various Greyhawk and Mystara products from back in the day. Acquisitions Inc itself grew out of this playstyle. If silly D&D is your thing, awesome! If silliness in your games grates on your nerves, the existence of silly things like AI and R&MvsD&D isn't going to force it.
Not at all. But I realize I'm not the target audience for 5e any longer, so back to 3rd edition and Pathfinder. I vote with my wallet.
 

Parmandur

Legend
Heck, one of the best conversions of non-updated planar creatures was started right here and then ported over to the DMs Guild, the Planar Bestiary.

But, I can't see them not eventually doing a full conversion - the setting just fits too well with their now-established setting book format. Overview, setting specific classes and races, (planar) geography, major focus on important city (this case Sigil), Factions (of which Planescape's are the codifiers for the game), magic items, bestiary. It almost writes itself! And as the Great Wheel Outer Planes are back to being the default, it still will have lots of use for people not directly interested in the setting...
Yeah, Planescape would fit their current model perfectly, to a T.
 

volanin

Explorer
If you had no idea that this book was not going to be for you... why the heck did you pre-order it in the first place?
While I understand the reasoning behind your question, pre-ordering from Amazon only brings advantages without any downsides at all. I might even say it's silly NOT to pre-order. Just like @realmprotector, I also had the book pre-ordered since it was up, and now that it is revealed, I also don't know yet if this book is for me. I still haven't cancelled my preorder, but I might... I have until March to decide.

The very best thing is that Amazon has pre-order lower price guarantee. The book is $34 right now, but since I pre-ordered early on, it's only $29 for me as the price dropped to this value at some point after I pre-ordered.
 

Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
I'll admit that if I got to pick a new setting, I wouldn't pick Wildemount... but it's not terrible either. I'm getting Eastern Europe/Romanian vibes, much like the Witcher, which I can always use more of!
 

R_J_K75

Adventurer
The very best thing is that Amazon has pre-order lower price guarantee. The book is $34 right now, but since I pre-ordered early on, it's only $29 for me as the price dropped to this value at some point after I pre-ordered.
Same here. I pre-ordered it when everyone thought it was a FR book knowing that I can always cancel the order a few days before it ships. A lot of people would be surprised how often Amazons prices change, sometimes hourly, sometimes even every few minutes. Chances are I will cancel the order because from what Ive seen about this book and after reading Mercers message I don't think this is something I'll use, but there is still two months to be convinced otherwise.
 

teitan

Adventurer
A someone who don't watch the show, I am sorely missing any information what makes this setting unique and special compared to the classics.

To the Fan's of the Show. Can anyone tell the rest of us what makes this Setting great and interesting?
So for me, I love the Tal'dorei book and it is more straightforward fantasy. If it is in Tomes of Foes, it applies etc. It takes some of the best aspects of 4e, like the Dawn War Pantheon, the PoLand approach and exemplifies it pretty well. The Vestiges of Divergence are pretty cool artifacts that slowly unveil themselves as the PC's figure them out and level up. The factions are cool and the book is filled with more seeds than almost any setting I've read in years and only a few of them played out on the show but not only are those on display as something you can latch onto but other seeds that Vox Machina didn't pick up on are present for you to develop as well.

Then with Wildemount you get a setting that is to Tal'dorei what Taladas is to Ansalon. It is a very different setting. Drow don't live underground, they rule a surface kingdom called the Krin Dynasty. They aren't necessarily evil either. This is the part of the world where the Calamity happened so large swaths of the continent are scarred from the conflict. Also, unlike other settings, this is not a world where the war just happened, this is a world where the war is starting to break out. A lot of the intrigue of the setting is in how the PCs can play each side, the grey areas of the conflict etc. It's also where the "monsters" come from. The Menagerie Coast is a great area to play pirate campaigns.

Overall the setting is about 1/3 of the way between Greyhawk and the Realms in the darkness factor. It isn't quite as "good always wins" as the Realms but not as "holy crap IUZ is going to overtake the world" as Greyhawk looked to be with From the Ashes.

To get even cooler... the big bad of Campaign 1 turned out to be a certain Lich God and campaign 2 is hinting very much at a certain chained up force of chaos. It has those classic D&D villains and it makes them cool again.
 

teitan

Adventurer
Wasnt this already done in 13th Age? Sounds very similar iirc.
Well it isn't a new concept, some variation of it has been in every edition via Dragon Mag or supplements. I distinctly recall a 3e era Dragon article on the concept and how magic items would gain XP with the player.
 

teitan

Adventurer
I wonder if one of the subclass will be that Ocean themed (Kraken?) Warlock I heard about?



Actually sounds pretty cool. Even if it's more Magic Fighters :p
Fjord is a Hexblade Warlock. Pact of the Blade. Nothing special, his patron is Uk'otoa


So it wasn't some special new class. He was just a patron.
 

teitan

Adventurer
2003, 3 years in. Forgotten Realms got serious support, Greyhawk and Planescape got...something...and Dragonlance, Ravenloft and maybe another had been licensed out.
FR got updated. Greyhawk had a sourcebook. Planescape got jack all. Dragonlance was released. Also Ghostwalk. Ravenloft was released by White Wolf. Dragonlance received continued support from Margaret Weis Productions. It was pretty much just FR and Eberron through 3.5 from WOTC.
 

Mecheon

Explorer
While I understand the reasoning behind your question, pre-ordering from Amazon only brings advantages without any downsides at all. I might even say it's silly NOT to pre-order.
My leg as deep into the video game side of thing as it is, pre-ordering still makes me very, very, VERY hesitant given the issues that's all come up with in the past few years, but, well, different genre.

I've come up with a hilariously dark realisation though: Critical Role is this decade's Dragonlance. Popular story turned official setting.
 

DEFCON 1

Legend
While I understand the reasoning behind your question, pre-ordering from Amazon only brings advantages without any downsides at all. I might even say it's silly NOT to pre-order. Just like @realmprotector, I also had the book pre-ordered since it was up, and now that it is revealed, I also don't know yet if this book is for me. I still haven't cancelled my preorder, but I might... I have until March to decide.

The very best thing is that Amazon has pre-order lower price guarantee. The book is $34 right now, but since I pre-ordered early on, it's only $29 for me as the price dropped to this value at some point after I pre-ordered.
I see. So the point of coming onto ENWorld to let everyone know they've cancelled their pre-order is to send a message to WotC stating "Hey... I'm not going to give the very least amount of discounted money possible to just ANY product... only to the ones I care about!" I'm sure WotC will take that view into account when deciding on products to make in the future. ;)
 

realmprotector

Explorer
If you had no idea that this book was not going to be for you... why the heck did you pre-order it in the first place?
amazon preorder is less money when you first order an item like this before the announcement. It’s all about saving money. If you want to pay more that’s great but I don’t.
 
My leg as deep into the video game side of thing as it is, pre-ordering still makes me very, very, VERY hesitant given the issues that's all come up with in the past few years, but, well, different genre.

I've come up with a hilariously dark realisation though: Critical Role is this decade's Dragonlance. Popular story turned official setting.
That's not at all what Dragonlance was. Dragonlance was produced in house as a campaign setting meant to highlight dragons, and during the playtest process they realized it would make some pretty good novels, too. Then it took off like a rocket and became a primarily fiction line.
 

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