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D&D 5E How many house rules?

How many house rules is too many?

  • 0 (RAW only)

    Votes: 1 1.7%
  • 1-2 (short and sweet)

    Votes: 6 10.3%
  • 3-5 (only if they're short)

    Votes: 16 27.6%
  • 6+ (keep 'em coming)

    Votes: 16 27.6%
  • None

    Votes: 6 10.3%
  • A few sentences

    Votes: 5 8.6%
  • A few paragraphs

    Votes: 14 24.1%
  • A few pages

    Votes: 18 31.0%

  • Total voters
    58

overgeeked

B/X Known World
This poll is specifically for 5E as I'm wondering specifically about 5E players responses.

5E is great because it moved back to the rulings not rules notion from some of the earlier editions of D&D, but I've noticed a distinct resistance to house rules amongst 5E players. Maybe it's that WotC has hammered rules not rulings for so long in D&D that it's going to take time before the reverse really seeps into the broader culture. But then, there's also a huge influx of new players with 5E so that is likely not an issue for those new to the hobby.

So, for the 5E players out there, how many house rules before you're out? I get that it depends on the house rule, but as a general thing, how many and how detailed can house rules get before you check out and don't want to bother playing?

Please vote for one option from the # section and one option from the length section.
 

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Magister Ludorum

Adventurer
We use slower healing, 3 saving throws, no level based ASIs (feats only, which means half them needed rewriting to take out +1 ASI), changes to concentration, changes to many spells, alternate death rules, and a few others.
 


iserith

Magic Wordsmith
As many as are needed to achieve the group's vision for the theme of the game. In my experience of D&D 5e, this hasn't been very many, perhaps less than half a dozen, including variant rules. At a certain point, enough house rules would encourage me to just use another system more suited for the vision of the adventure or campaign.
 

Fanaelialae

Legend
I voted none, but my actual intent is that the appropriate number of house rules is whatever you need to accomplish the game you intend to run. House ruling for the sake of itself is generally... less than ideal.

A friend of mine is running a Mad Max style post apocalyptic campaign (using 5e). He has an entire wiki devoted to this campaign. He threw out the races and classes, and made his own, and also added on a system of perks and companions and vehicles and a bunch of other stuff. The campaign is a lot of fun, so it's all good.

Whereas for my most recent campaign, which was for two experienced players and two players who'd never played a TTRPG before, I only had a single house rule (it was fairly minor). At the request of the more experienced players (and with the consent of the newbies) I eventually added in some of the house rules I'd used in prior campaigns, but to start it was just the one.
 

loverdrive

Makin' cool stuff
Publisher
I have a couple.

1) A PC can die only if the player decides so, and always goes in a splash. Nothing can bring them back, though.
2) ASI is both an actual ASI and taking a feat
3) Attack bonusi and spell DCs are decoupled from stats (+5/13 at Tier 1, +7/14 at Tier 2, and so on)
 


loverdrive

Makin' cool stuff
Publisher
A friend of mine is running a Mad Max style post apocalyptic campaign (using 5e). He has an entire wiki devoted to this campaign. He threw out the races and classes, and made his own, and also added on a system of perks and companions and vehicles and a bunch of other stuff. The campaign is a lot of fun, so it's all good.
This sounds like something that deserves to be published...
 


Magister Ludorum

Adventurer
My younger players (17-21) prefer games with a higher chance of death. They also like save-or-die and save-or-suck spells. I played 2e with them for a while (after 3.5/PF1 and before 5e). They liked many things about earlier editions. We just edited the things they didn't like back to an earlier model that they preferred.

The "adult game" (45-70 year olds) play without houserules.
 


MatthewJHanson

Registered Ninja
Publisher
I haven't run into a situation yet where I've felt like it's too much, and I've had some pretty significant amounts of house rules.
 

aco175

Legend
I said 3-5, but cannot think of that many off hand. We play with flanking, but that may be more an optional rule. We use the average for the die on rolling HP if you roll bad. We just adopted the bonus action to administer a healing potion, and you roll that and if you use your action, you get full HP. I'm sure there are a couple more smaller ones.
 

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen
I love coming up with house rules and homebrew, but when it comes to actually playing, I only use a few at a time and try to keep them fairly unobtrusive. I want the players to be able to count on pretty close to a by the book experience, maybe with some small tweaks to suit the particular campaign.
 


delericho

Legend
I have a small number of player-facing house rules, but a much larger set that I use behind the screen to try to help smooth gameplay. Some of the latter are completely invisible to the players, while some (such as how I give out XP) are made known so that they can factor them into how they play the game (if they want).
 

Laurefindel

Legend
Quality matters far more than quantity, I'm afraid. A small number of bad house rules can make me rethink participating, but a large number of good ones doesn't bother me at all.
this

also, the "depth" of said houserules are also important. Deep houserules that affect a variety of factors and forces us to rethink or recalculate everything takes a lot of tolerance "room" toward being considered one too many. And as people said, the more the houserule supports or enhances specific style of play, the more tolerable it becomes.

So for me, too much houseruling is not measured in numbers (or word count).
 
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