D&D General Planning a D&D editions tour

Orius

Legend
I'd recommend these:

0e: The original game didn't really do modules, but unless you're willing to go with a third party choice, B1 is probably your closest match. It was published for Holmes, but Holmes was an intro to 0e anyway.

1e: Hommlet or Saltmarsh are the big choices here, Hommlet is probably the more classic and iconic of the two.

Classic D&D: B2 of course. It you must insist on splitting it among B/X, BECMI, and RC, then B2 for B/X and possibly B10 for BECMI. For RC, Escape from Zanzer's Dungeon if it's available or one of the packs connected to Thunder Rift.

2e didn't have a lot of short, particularly low level generic adventures that were notable through most of its run. I think the best bet here is The Shattered Circle which was a late edition adventure. Alternatively, you could go with a combination of Wrath of the Minotaur and Eye of the Wyvern.

3e: The Sunless Citadel.

4e: Keep on the Shadowfell seems to be the iconic adventure here, though I've seen mixed reactions to it. Not familiar with 4e myself.

5e: Lost Mine of Phandelver.

If you're just looking for a taste of each edition, then low level adventures are your best bet. High level stuff will require more knowledge of each edition to run.
 
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Jacob Lewis

Ye Olde GM
The biggest advantage for running Keep on the Shadowfell for a 4th Edition game is that includes some basic rules and pregens so you don't need to purchase materials, or learn more rules than necessary. For a short term introduction game, it's fine.

Reavers of Harkenwold is a much more satisfying experience, starting characters at level 2 and completing the story by level 4. It's essentially a 32-page adventure contained in two booklets, and are included in the DM's Kit.

If you need more ready-to-play options for your group who might not be familiar with the rules, you can find plenty here. They are pregens from the Encounters seasons, most are level 1.
 

Lanefan

Victoria Rules
I'd recommend these:

0e: The original game didn't really do modules, but unless you're willing to go with a third party choice, B1 is probably your closest match. It was published for Holmes, but Holmes was an intro to 0e anyway.

1e: Hommlet or Saltmarsh are the big choices here, Hommlet is probably the more classic and iconic of the two.

Classic D&D: B2 of course. It you must insist on splitting it among B/X, BECMI, and RC, then B2 for B/X and possibly B10 for BECMI. For RC, Escape from Zanzer's Dungeon if it's available or one of the packs connected to Thunder Rift.
Be warned that B10 is a huge module, almost a mini-campaign in itself if you play it all the way through.
2e didn't have a lot of short, particularly low level generic adventures that were notable through most of its run. I think the best bet here is The Shattered Circle which was a late edition adventure. Alternatively, you could go with a combination of Wrath of the Minotaur and Eye of the Wyvern.

3e: The Sunless Citadel.

4e: Keep on the Shadowfell seems to be the iconic adventure here, though I've seen mixed reactions to it. Not familiar with 4e myself.

5e: Lost Mine of Phandelver.

If you're just looking for a taste of each edition, then low level adventures are your best bet. High level stuff will require more knowledge of each edition to run.
If it's to be the same characters all the way along, by the time they get to 3e-4e-5e they'll be far too high level for the intro adventures for those editions.
 

JohnSnow

Hero
If what you want is a good low-level adventure, my 2e recommendation is to run The Sword of the Dales, The Secret of Spiderhaunt, and The Return of Randall Morn, but that may just be my nostalgia speaking. I loved those adventures.
 

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