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D&D 5E [Rules Question] Opportunity Attacks and Total Cover

jadrax

Adventurer
I think you could argue that your reach only extends its full distance if there is not an obstacle in the way. If you are stood next to a wall 2 foot away, thus your reach is only 2 foot and anything melding into the wall is leaving your reach, even if its only moving 3 foot from you.
 

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mcbobbo

Explorer
I would say engaged is a good way to put it. However, I would say that moving to a space the the enemy can't attack you is leaving the engagement and should provoke.
I agree, and I guess I would apply this to the rogue behind the desk as well.

Again I think the penalty attaches to the decision to move, not to where you wind up.
 

Joe Liker

First Post
I would say engaged is a good way to put it. However, I would say that moving to a space the the enemy can't attack you is leaving the engagement and should provoke.
It's not about what the enemy can or cannot do; it's about whether you have broken the momentum of combat to step backward. A rogue can do this because he or she is specially trained to direct that momentum in unexpected ways. Everyone else can only dodge sideways.

The enemy doesn't get an opportunity attack if it's about to become incapacitated or if you are about to teleport, so why should it get one just because you're about to become unattackable for some other reason? The only thing that matters is whether you've lowered your defenses by stepping away. In stepping away, you are considered to have turned your back, however briefly, and left yourself open to a quick jab.
 

Skyscraper

Explorer
I would say engaged is a good way to put it. However, I would say that moving to a space the the enemy can't attack you is leaving the engagement and should provoke.

This is a good point. I do not agree and would not interpret it that way, but I think that it makes perfect sense. I believe both interpretations are arguable.
 

Chocolategravy

First Post
I agree. By the book no provoke is the right answer, however I think provoking should happen when leaving a threatened square for a non-threatened square.

You're right on both counts, however changing the rules to match previous editions where there would be an OA in this case is adding complexity they intentionally removed.

It may not have just been simplicity either. The intent may have been to allow someone to step behind a wall or barrier and not provoke. The Xorn is the same thing just less obvious.
 

There is a difference. While readying an action to pop the rogue is valid, there are many other ways of dealing with the rogue.
1. Teleport next to him, on the other side of the corner or sideways to see around the corner.
2. Launch a fireball or other area of effect attack
3. Charge.
4. Others I haven't come up with.

With the Xorn, it seems like you are stuck with waiting.

Well, in that case you could:

1. Pour acid or alchemist's fire on the floor that the Xorn would have to attack through;
2. Cast a cloudkill or other persistent damage spell on the area that the Xorn would be exposed to on attacking;
3. Put a wall of force or iron across the floor to prevent the Xorn's attacks;
4. Cast passwall on the floor to expose the Xorn;
5. Set a mechanical trap on the floor to attack the Xorn when it attacks

... and so on.
 

Tormyr

Hero
Well, in that case you could:

1. Pour acid or alchemist's fire on the floor that the Xorn would have to attack through;
2. Cast a cloudkill or other persistent damage spell on the area that the Xorn would be exposed to on attacking;
3. Put a wall of force or iron across the floor to prevent the Xorn's attacks;
4. Cast passwall on the floor to expose the Xorn;
5. Set a mechanical trap on the floor to attack the Xorn when it attacks

... and so on.

These are some really inventive ideas, and they help you do something other than readying an action, but I think this process is highlighting that the Xorn is a tough one when played in this way.
1. The acid does 2d6 damage. The alchemist's Fire only does 1d4 because the Xorn descends under the earth again and puts out the fire on it.
2. The persistent spells would work well, but the Xorn has Tremorsense and is coming up next to a target. Cloadkill, Firestorm or other spells would be placed on top of allies as well.
3. Wall of force can cover 1000 sq ft. That will do a good job of keeping the Xorn out for 10 minutes. Nice.
4. Passwall would need to have a general sense of where the Xorn is. The party might get a round of attacks in. They need to make them count.
5. This is a great idea because it keeps the Xorn above ground. Unfortunately, the only mechanical trap we have at the moment is the Hunter's trap which requires someone to step on the pressure plate. Even if the Xorn did, it has a decent chance of breaking free.

Nice ideas, and you proved me wrong about not being able to do anything other than wait.
 

fjw70

Adventurer
This is a good point. I do not agree and would not interpret it that way, but I think that it makes perfect sense. I believe both interpretations are arguable.

I am not interpreting the rules just proposing an alternate rule. I would agree with your interpretation of RAW.
 

aramis erak

Legend
I agree. By the book no provoke is the right answer, however I think provoking should happen when leaving a threatened square for a non-threatened square.

If you can't hit something there, it's outside your reach... no matter how short the straight line distance.

At least, IMO and IMG.
 

fjw70

Adventurer
L
It's not about what the enemy can or cannot do; it's about whether you have broken the momentum of combat to step backward. A rogue can do this because he or she is specially trained to direct that momentum in unexpected ways. Everyone else can only dodge sideways.

The enemy doesn't get an opportunity attack if it's about to become incapacitated or if you are about to teleport, so why should it get one just because you're about to become unattackable for some other reason? The only thing that matters is whether you've lowered your defenses by stepping away. In stepping away, you are considered to have turned your back, however briefly, and left yourself open to a quick jab.

You don't need to lower your defenses or turn your back to step away from the enemy.
 

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