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D&D General Things That Bug You

Reynard

Legend
This is just a thread for things about D&D -- any edition or simulacrum -- that kind of bug you. It isn't a place for an edition war or to attack other people for their opinions. And it isn't a place where we talk about real issues that might cause real harm to people. it's a place for grousing about the small stuff.

Okay.

In 5E, it really irks me that all of the summoning spells are described as calling form some spirit that then takes the form of the whatever-you-summoned. That is just DUMB. Why not summon the actual thing? It's magic? If I summon wolves -- I literally drag wolves from someplace in the woods to serve me for a short time and send the survivors back.

In pretty much all versions of the game: Charisma. It's a mess. It doesn't mean what they think it means.
 

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Emerikol

Adventurer
I would agree on Charisma and on Wisdom too. I think Willpower is a great stat.

I think some of the assumptions about what makes players happy in modern game design bug me.

I think adventures that can be placed in any number of places in a world is something valued in the old days and not really valued these days. I like a module that I can drop into any swamp or any foothills or any forest.
 

el-remmen

Moderator Emeritus
I feel like no edition of D&D that I can recall had a nice clean and easy and memorable system for grappling/wrestling. Some of them may have worked fine in practice, but every time it comes up it still feels like something we need to stop and look at the book to confirm it is being done right.
 

kenada

Hero
Supporter
Balance treadmills. Inevitably in discussions on balance or magic item economy or things like that, the conversation turns to what the system assumes and how you should itemize or build your character. It adds a bunch of complexity and places where players can screw things up for the equivalent of “you have a X% chance of succeeding at (some task)”.

Badly keyed adventures. There are good ones (in OSR adventures), but the ones for Pathfinder and 5e I have run were pretty bad. I get there are business reasons (to make them more appealing to those who read but not run them), but I inevitably have to put in extra work fixing or rekeying them to use them at the table.
 
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Mind of tempest

Adventurer
aside from the ideas above the lack of proper integration setting wise and the subpar implementation of monks and psionics or as I wish to describe them the internal magic classes.

also, they lack any race that loves them, who are in the player handbook, that live in the prime material and are reasonably iconic.
 
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vincegetorix

Jewel of the North
Oh yeah, the 6 stats are a mess! My wisdom increases my eyesight?

oh and: give me subclasses with passive features (champion, thief etc). Sometime I dont want 15 different buttons to press 2/per rest :p

With my table entirely composed of persons afflicted with ADHD, an active feature is a forgotten feature :p
 





It used to be the guy with all the crazy skills no one else had. Backstab used to come up very rarely in 1E & 2E - much, much harder to do back then as opposed to now. As I recall, at best you’d get it only if you got the drop on opponents before combat started.
Of course, then you need the dm to know what those skills are and how to incorporate them when a rogue is present but not when there isn't one, which makes dming that much harder, and also means that for some reason the barbarian can't learn how to climb.
 

Reynard

Legend
It used to be the guy with all the crazy skills no one else had. Backstab used to come up very rarely in 1E & 2E - much, much harder to do back then as opposed to now. As I recall, at best you’d get it only if you got the drop on opponents before combat started.
You can literally make a rogue that isn't any good at any of the rogueish stuff and is still the best fighter of the group. It is a really strange evolution.
 

Reynard

Legend
Of course, then you need the dm to know what those skills are and how to incorporate them when a rogue is present but not when there isn't one, which makes dming that much harder, and also means that for some reason the barbarian can't learn how to climb.
The philosophy was a lot different regarding who could try what before there were general skills. That the thief had hide in shadows and move silently did not mean that no one else could sneak into the castle, it meant that the thief could literally disappear in the shadows in a way others could not. The thief did not have "climbing" -- the thief could climb sheer surfaces.
 

Stormonu

Legend
Of course, then you need the dm to know what those skills are and how to incorporate them when a rogue is present but not when there isn't one, which makes dming that much harder, and also means that for some reason the barbarian can't learn how to climb.
Uh, the skills were pretty straightforward, and the barbarian DID have the climb ability back then.

However, the game has evolved and changed and I don’t think I’d want to go back to the old system.

(I have a feeling this thread is going to get very edition warry very quickly.)
 

Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
In 5E, I'd say it's going back to magical items that replace ability scores. It just never made sense to me that a toddler could pick up daddy's belt and suddenly be stronger than any human alive.

Dexterity being an uber-stat. I get that it's the trend that you don't need strength to use a war bow, but it's just dumb. There' really not much reason to make a strength based character outside of maybe barbarians. I'm not even sure the small plus to damage barbarians get to damage outweigh a high dex build depending on what you're shooting for. A high dex barbarian with rapier and shield would still do decent damage and could make an awesome tank.

Having the option to always use a quarterstaff one handed. I get that in real life certain strikes use one hand to get reach, but you can do the same with a two-handed sword. It's situational and you still return to two-handed after the strike. In any case, I blame the LOTR and Gandalf waving his staff around to distract the enemy for this.
 

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