D&D General What rule do you hate most from any edition? (+ Thread)

teitan

Legend
True enough. I got carried away and lost my thread there for a minute.

I love 1E, but there are so many dumb rules I wouldn't know where to begin.
By ignoring them? LOL SO much of 1e was ignoring what didn't make sense and just making it up as you went along, like 5e, but more flavorful. 5e is like that fruit stripe gum, so much flavor at first then it just goes downhill into bland town. 1e was flavor for a while, like Teakberry gum or Licorice, you acquire the taste for it and it's amazing but not enough have the patience to acquire that taste.
 

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JediSoth

Semi-Professional Author
Epic
I don't want to get too nitpicky about every edition, so I'll just present the ONE thing that has caused me more angst than any other rule: Interrupts.

I hate 'em. I have a hard enough time keeping track of all the monsters'/NPCs' abilities without having my train of thought interrupted by a player butting in while I'm taking their actions and "Nope-ing" me. Decades of "you've had your turn now it's MY turn" has been difficult for me to purge from my brain.
 

Matt in the Wheel of Time, Sparhawk in the Elenium, some instances of it in Terry Goodkind books, lots of it in George R.R. Martin books, Harry Dresden in The Dresden Files, Luke in Star Wars, James Bond, Corwin in Nine Princes in Amber, and the list goes on.
The difference is really that they only get injured near the end of the current adventure (or they can power through until then) and then have time to recover.

To make his work in DnD, you'd need to give enough hit points that pc's can avoid injury until the very end reliably, and make recovery take more than just rest. Which is possible, but not how DnD has ever really worked.

(13th Age tries to do this, but does so in a really metagamey way.)
 


Faolyn

(she/her)
LIke in BIG RED LETTERS
Used pink to differentiate from Moderators. We went from an Edition put back in the hands of DM's to an edition of... confusion?
<color pedant> That's scarlet lake, not pink. </color pedant>

(The color picker for this site is quite limited. This is pink. I hadta use a hexcode to get it.)
 

Vaalingrade

Legend
I didn't really like 4e's AEDU structure for some classes, I mean it worked fine mechanically, but I wanted my warriors to have techniques that they could use more than once a day or once per encounter. Like, why was I only able to menace a villain once per day?
Kind of what 'A' stood for, no?

I mean, I hate daily abilities at all, but At-will powers were there and encounter powers are in genre as the power that requires set-up or timing.
 

cbwjm

Legend
Kind of what 'A' stood for, no?

I mean, I hate daily abilities at all, but At-will powers were there and encounter powers are in genre as the power that requires set-up or timing.
Yeah and those were fine but the E and D, and usually the U were annoying for some classes. I was fine for magic classes, it was similar to the fire and forget spells of previous editions, but for the martial classes I really didn't like it.
 

Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
The difference is really that they only get injured near the end of the current adventure (or they can power through until then) and then have time to recover.
No.

Matt in the Wheel of Time was laid out for days in the middle of the story due to the dagger and healing. Harry Dresden was in rehab for weeks or months in the book at the beginning of the story. Luke had to spend time in the bacta tank healing from his injuries at the beginning of Empire Strikes Back. James Bond has had to recover at the beginning of the movie. Corwin in Nine Princes in Amber has to recover more than once from injuries at the beginning or middle of books, as does his son Corwin in the middle of books. Important members in the Sparhawk books had to be left behind on occasion to heal.

Heroes healing in the middle of books isn't as rare as you guys want to make it out to be. I think it's in the minority of stories, but it's not particularly rare.
To make his work in DnD, you'd need to give enough hit points that pc's can avoid injury until the very end reliably, and make recovery take more than just rest. Which is possible, but not how DnD has ever really worked.
Yeah. I'm not saying this is very feasible in D&D. I'm refuting the claim that it was rare in fantasy stories.
 

Yardiff

Adventurer
3.x Icon magic items that were reduced to a shadow of their coolness. Examples: Gauntlets of Ogre Power and Girdles of Giant Strength.

PF1 Trip maneuver and Trip Weapon trait.

5e Attunement. Global Dex bonus to damage. 'Small' PC races being able to be as strong as a hill giant without use of magic, also the same for medium PC races. SO many spells requiring concentration. No ability score requirement to be a class. Long rest full healing...and lots more that I cant think of at this time
 

robemm

Villager
1e/2e: Inconsistent dice roll objectives. If you're attacking, you need to roll HIGH. Same if you're making a saving throw. But if you want to make an ability check, you want to roll LOW. Oh, also initiative, roll LOW. A LOW Thac0 is good, and the lower your armor class is, the better. But HIGH ability scores are good. It's like playing a bizarre golf/basketball hybrid.

I was OK with 2e level drains in concept, but rarely applied them. At low levels, it didn't matter much (if your 4th level PC gets drained to 3rd level, she'll get back to 4th before the others get to 5th, and will be something like 5% behind the others by 7th level) and at high levels, it just became a way to relieve PCs of extra cash/treasure (find an amenable NPC priest and have her cast restoration in return for a 'donation')

1e racial level limits were too low. They seldom if ever came into play in any 2e game I played or DMed.

Didn't play 3e and 4e.

5e: Insta-healing. When the going gets tough, the tough... take a short rest? No matter how oppressive the environment is, all it takes is a good night's sleep and everyone is ready to go? Totally takes away long term tension in an adventure when healing is that easy to come by.
 

Lanefan

Victoria Rules
1e/2e: Inconsistent dice roll objectives. If you're attacking, you need to roll HIGH. Same if you're making a saving throw. But if you want to make an ability check, you want to roll LOW. Oh, also initiative, roll LOW. A LOW Thac0 is good, and the lower your armor class is, the better. But HIGH ability scores are good. It's like playing a bizarre golf/basketball hybrid.
The advantage of this is that bringing loaded dice to the game becomes pointless... :)
 

The advantage of this is that bringing loaded dice to the game becomes pointless... :)
Not that I suspect them of using loaded dice, but I've seen enough people with dice set aside for specific types of rolls in my AD&D days to know that wouldn't stop someone if they were inclined to try.
 

I had never read the PhB straight through with 5e before jumping in and just making the characters I wanted. I've been reading the Level-Up A5E Adventurers Guide... and holy F. Everything does have Darkvision!?!?!
I think 5e that has darkvision only raising illumination by one step makes darkvision a double edged sword. You can miss a lot including hidden creatures.
 

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