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WotC Which releases do you own?

Which WotC 5E Products do you own?

  • Player's Handbook

    Votes: 173 98.3%
  • Dungeon Master's Guide

    Votes: 169 96.0%
  • Monster Manual

    Votes: 165 93.8%
  • Hoard of the Dragon Queen

    Votes: 66 37.5%
  • Rise of Tiamat

    Votes: 57 32.4%
  • Princes of the Apocalypse

    Votes: 73 41.5%
  • Out of the Abyss

    Votes: 77 43.8%
  • Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide

    Votes: 108 61.4%
  • Curse of Strahd

    Votes: 80 45.5%
  • Storm King's Thunder

    Votes: 69 39.2%
  • Volo's Guide to Monsters

    Votes: 135 76.7%
  • Tales of the Yawning Portal

    Votes: 91 51.7%
  • Tomb of Annihilation

    Votes: 78 44.3%
  • Xanathar's Guide to Everything

    Votes: 142 80.7%
  • Mordenkainen's Tome of Foes

    Votes: 119 67.6%
  • Waterdeep: Dragon Heist

    Votes: 71 40.3%
  • Waterdeep: Dungeon of the Mad Mage

    Votes: 72 40.9%
  • Guildmasters' Guide to Ravnica

    Votes: 59 33.5%
  • Tyranny of Dragons

    Votes: 36 20.5%
  • Ghosts of Saltmarsh

    Votes: 85 48.3%
  • Acquisitions Incorporated

    Votes: 32 18.2%
  • Baldur's Gate: Descent Into Avernus

    Votes: 68 38.6%
  • Eberron: Rising from the Last War

    Votes: 88 50.0%
  • Explorer's Guide to Wildemount

    Votes: 55 31.3%
  • Mythic Odysseys of Theros

    Votes: 31 17.6%
  • Starter Set

    Votes: 88 50.0%
  • Essentials Kit

    Votes: 67 38.1%

  • Total voters
    176

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AcererakTriple6

Adventurer
And were talking 5 tops? A couple at least being adventures and one a box set.

Still VERY slow.
This year should be slower no matter what their schedule was. The pandemic is definitely messing with the schedule. Normally they've announced their 3rd book of the year by now.
 

Mercurius

Legend
And were talking 5 tops? A couple at least being adventures and one a box set.

Still VERY slow.
Yep, that would be my guess. Above I suggested a slow, graduated increase: 3 books per year in 2015-17, 4 per year in 2018-20, and maybe 5 in 2021-23, with 2024 being the big anniversary. Of course it is possible that they max out at 4.
 

darjr

I crit!
4 hard backs per year, do you think Paizo’s thinner paperbacks count? Those seemed like collects rules and fluff for thier paths, with the significant rules ending up in hardbacks anyway. At least that’s how we treated them, mostly ignored unless the oath required it somehow.
 

prabe

Aspiring Lurker (He/Him)
Supporter
Well, this isn't a representative sample, either. But it is suggestive of how the current strategy may be working out for WotC...
I wonder if in this sample, DMs are overrepresented? That'd explain at least part of why the adventure books are as well-represented as they are. I know that I as a player wouldn't buy an adventure book someone I knew was planning to DM.
 



Sabathius42

Bree-Yark
My theory on the data...

5e had a massive growth spurt that is good for the brand in general...but the growth comes from a groundswell of new players who aren't as interested in creating their own world as much as using premade adventures and supplements. This is causing a bit of a rift from "old school" D&D players who want to see old rules and settings redone instead of new ground being covered. The slow pace of new books (it takes awhile to get through an adventure path) and the high ratio of setting and adventure books over generally useful crunch supplements contributes to this issue.

My theory on where this trend takes us...

Some players who like the 5e system in play are going to stray in search of the expanding crunch that they would like to see. They may turn to 3rd party or jump ship to another system. It won't be a major hit for the brand moneywise. <---this is my trajectory, waiting on the rest of the parts of my ship

The golden age of board/card/RPGs will eventually return to a normal churn and WotC is at some point going to have to make a choice between continually chasing the new blood or trying to keep their old fans happy. Good business says pick the side that pays the most cash. <----this happened to the Warhammer and Warhammer 40k tabletop

If 5e is truly determined to be "Evergreen" then a lot of people who jump ship aren't going to pop back in like they would with an entirely new experience of a new edition.
 

Parmandur

Legend
I wonder if in this sample, DMs are overrepresented? That'd explain at least part of why the adventure books are as well-represented as they are. I know that I as a player wouldn't buy an adventure book someone I knew was planning to DM.
My understanding is that DMs are overrepresented in the population of folks who buy any books...
 


Mercurius

Legend
I put this together real fast just to get a visual representation of release schedule of 5E. I've tried to include everything except for miniatures or dice sets (except for Laeral, because it stands alone) with hardcovers emphasized in green. Obviously the schedule has been busier the last couple years. Edit: I think miscellaneous stuff counts towards work-load, so them cutting back could simply mean less extraneous bits. Edit 2: I forgot the Tyranny of Dragons reissue. Oh well.

1590020182787.png
 
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Mercurius

Legend
4 hard backs per year, do you think Paizo’s thinner paperbacks count? Those seemed like collects rules and fluff for thier paths, with the significant rules ending up in hardbacks anyway. At least that’s how we treated them, mostly ignored unless the oath required it somehow.
Well it depends upon how you want to count them. Let's take 2011 as an example:

1 box set (Beginner's Box)
4 hardcovers (including Inner Sea Guide)
7 players companions
11 setting books
3 map folios
12 adventure path books (of three paths)
6 modules

(I could be missing something)

So that's 44 individual items. If we collapse the adventure paths, including the maps it reduces to 32.
 

Parmandur

Legend
Well it depends upon how you want to count them. Let's take 2011 as an example:

1 box set (Beginner's Box)
4 hardcovers (including Inner Sea Guide)
7 players companions
11 setting books
3 map folios
12 adventure path books (of three paths)
6 modules

(I could be missing something)

So that's 44 individual items. If we collapse the adventure paths, including the maps it reduces to 32.
That's why I never bought anything, right there...

I'd read the WotC previews of what was coming up, think it looked cool, but pass on everything due to analysis paralysis. Now, I buy everything, because there is only one big thing a Quarter(ish)
 

Mercurius

Legend
That's why I never bought anything, right there...

I'd read the WotC previews of what was coming up, think it looked cool, but pass on everything due to analysis paralysis. Now, I buy everything, because there is only one big thing a Quarter(ish)
I never played Pathfinder but being a setting junky, and mostly enjoying Paizo's output, I would buy about half of the Golarion books, and occasionally some of the hardcovers.
 

AcererakTriple6

Adventurer
There is definitely a sweet spot of the amount of content you release every year. If you release a book or product every month or more, that's too much and you're flooding the community with content. If you release 1-2 main products a year, that's probably too little, and makes people thirsty for more content. 3-5 books/products is probably the best balance of products over the course of a normal year.
 

Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
Of course I don't know, but let's look at the facts on the ground. D&D is thriving in an unprecedented way--they're selling far more books than their best hopes. What would lead you to believe that their strategy is holding back the game?

"Full potential" doesn't mean anything. There are merely different degrees of success, and 5E is a wild success.

So while I'm speculating, it is based on something actual, while your speculation is based on a hypothetical abstraction ("full potential").
Your speculation is equally hypothetical. Correlation does not equal causation. There's nothing to indicate that the wild success is due to the release rate. There is a lot of support for the idea that it's due to it being widely appealing, bringing back old players and bringing in new ones. You're assuming as much as I am.
 

Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
I don’t think so. I think it’s a very fine line, an invisible one. And the only defense is to stay well away.
You think there's a fine line between 63 books of crunch in the first 6 years and 6 books of crunch in the first 6 years? Really?
 


Parmandur

Legend
You think there's a fine line between 63 books of crunch in the first 6 years and 6 books of crunch in the first 6 years? Really?
The line is somewhere, and 2019 was pushing it. They released 4 major products in 2018, and I bought 4. They released 7 major products in 2019, and I bought 4.
 

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