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WotC Which releases do you own?

Which WotC 5E Products do you own?

  • Player's Handbook

    Votes: 173 98.3%
  • Dungeon Master's Guide

    Votes: 169 96.0%
  • Monster Manual

    Votes: 165 93.8%
  • Hoard of the Dragon Queen

    Votes: 66 37.5%
  • Rise of Tiamat

    Votes: 57 32.4%
  • Princes of the Apocalypse

    Votes: 73 41.5%
  • Out of the Abyss

    Votes: 77 43.8%
  • Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide

    Votes: 108 61.4%
  • Curse of Strahd

    Votes: 80 45.5%
  • Storm King's Thunder

    Votes: 69 39.2%
  • Volo's Guide to Monsters

    Votes: 135 76.7%
  • Tales of the Yawning Portal

    Votes: 91 51.7%
  • Tomb of Annihilation

    Votes: 78 44.3%
  • Xanathar's Guide to Everything

    Votes: 142 80.7%
  • Mordenkainen's Tome of Foes

    Votes: 119 67.6%
  • Waterdeep: Dragon Heist

    Votes: 71 40.3%
  • Waterdeep: Dungeon of the Mad Mage

    Votes: 72 40.9%
  • Guildmasters' Guide to Ravnica

    Votes: 59 33.5%
  • Tyranny of Dragons

    Votes: 36 20.5%
  • Ghosts of Saltmarsh

    Votes: 85 48.3%
  • Acquisitions Incorporated

    Votes: 32 18.2%
  • Baldur's Gate: Descent Into Avernus

    Votes: 68 38.6%
  • Eberron: Rising from the Last War

    Votes: 88 50.0%
  • Explorer's Guide to Wildemount

    Votes: 55 31.3%
  • Mythic Odysseys of Theros

    Votes: 31 17.6%
  • Starter Set

    Votes: 88 50.0%
  • Essentials Kit

    Votes: 67 38.1%

  • Total voters
    176

Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
Yeah. I agree. It's like a self parody of D&D.
Strangely, I typically don't like comedy mixing with my nerdom and sci-fi. Can't read Douglas Adams or Terry Pratchett and don't listen to They Might Be Giants, for example. I guess it's just a bad reaction to growing up in the American Bible Belt during the Satanic Panic and having to defend my interests against ridicule and bullies making fun of me.
I love both Adams and Pratchett. I even like playing parody games, when that's what I'm signing up to play. D&D isn't such a game for me. There was a game I played many years ago called It Came From the Late Late show, where you played B actors inside a B movie. The game even gave you points for being appropriately stupid. i.e. "I heard something outside. You guys stay here and I'll pick up this fireplace poker and go take a look."
 

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Fenris-77

Small God of the Dozens
Supporter
I also love both Pratchett and Adams and I also very much like Acquisitions Inc. However, why I like it is not because I want to run a full satire game all the time (at all), although I have run it and was a hoot. The book actually has some very cool mechanics in it, and is a wonderful source of idea for downtime and henchmen, as well as about Adventurer's Guilds generally. I find it pretty easy to strip off the parody when I need to.
 

cbwjm

I can add a custom title.
I also love both Pratchett and Adams and I also very much like Acquisitions Inc. However, why I like it is not because I want to run a full satire game all the time (at all), although I have run it and was a hoot. The book actually has some very cool mechanics in it, and is a wonderful source of idea for downtime and henchmen, as well as about Adventurer's Guilds generally. I find it pretty easy to strip off the parody when I need to.
That's the main reason why I like it. Though I will admit, the thought of running some sort of DnD parody does at times sound appealing.
 

I wasn't unhappy with Acquisitions Inc. once I bought it. There are some good things in the book including some NPCs written up in the back. If I hadn't found it for half price, I probably wouldn't have bought it even though it would have been the only 5e book I didn't have.

I have a visceral dislike for D&D games that try to be funny.
 

prabe

Aspiring Lurker (He/Him)
Supporter
I have a visceral dislike for D&D games that try to be funny.
I love Pratchett and Adams, but I don't make any effort to make the settings or the events funny in my games. Wisecracking and suchlike doesn't bother me.

My own strongest distaste is for games that aim at "funny" and hit "silly."
 


Marandahir

Crown-Forester
I'm one of those chumps that owns everything twice - once in physical, once in DDB.

I also have the second copies of the core rule books bc special edition covers.
 


Marandahir

Crown-Forester
DDB is not the tool of chumps.
Oh, I was being facetious. A lot of people have called us chumps for paying twice, and insist that DDB should be included in the price of the book or heavily discounted or something versus the books.

I like having the easy reference tool online (so much better than D&D Insiders' toolset last edition!) but I also love the feel of the physical books and they excite me. I mostly buy the special edition covers for that reason.

Sorry for my poor-mannered words.
 




ZeshinX

Explorer
Core rules, the "Monster Manuals" and the "splatbooks". I don't touch the adventure stuff (no need of them, I create my own) and will never go near the D&D/MtG crossover stuff (despise the crossing of those streams, but do understand people love it, so power to them and its great they get that itch scratched).

I'd buy campaign setting guides if they were to publish them (caveat being of established D&D settings akin to those of the past, a la FRCS of 3.x and the like). Don't care for their current mode of "Heinz 57" Adventure Modules with a little local flavour splashed in (cool for those that do).

Given their current approach, I suspect I'll be buying one book every year and a half when they release a new splat of collected options from their storyline stuff (hopefully the MtG crossover stuff never find its way into those). Pretty much all of the rest offers zero appeal to me.
 
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Helldritch

Adventurer
It is unfortunate that you feel this way. The Acquisition inc book is full of good stuff for organisations and downtime rules and idea about downtime repercursions. The Ravnica book is a treasure for what a guild can bring your character. So much better than what was in the DMG. It was inspiring to say the least and I adapted a few of the Ravnica guilds to my campaign (five of these I adapted to be the factions of FR and all of a sudden, my players are eager to play the faction theme.) Some of the new races are so so, but some others are really good and are worth a shot at it. The same goes for adventures with the added monsters, background stories and other goodies. Even if you don't play them, they're a good read and can give you ideas for your own adventures.
 

ZeshinX

Explorer
It is unfortunate that you feel this way. The Acquisition inc book is full of good stuff for organisations and downtime rules and idea about downtime repercursions. The Ravnica book is a treasure for what a guild can bring your character. So much better than what was in the DMG. It was inspiring to say the least and I adapted a few of the Ravnica guilds to my campaign (five of these I adapted to be the factions of FR and all of a sudden, my players are eager to play the faction theme.) Some of the new races are so so, but some others are really good and are worth a shot at it. The same goes for adventures with the added monsters, background stories and other goodies. Even if you don't play them, they're a good read and can give you ideas for your own adventures.
'Tis good advice, certainly. All of which I long ago took (been playing/DMing since 1e). Those books offer me nothing of substantive value I haven't already been practising for a good 25+ years (certainly the concepts if not the presented specifics). Don't misunderstand me though, I'm not lamenting the existence of those books, and certainly not the value they hold for newer players to the game. They hold a valued and welcome place in the library of anyone who has recently started playing (or even those keen to simply add to their respective library as a good read, as you say). It's just not enough for me to find much use for them (my own ideas for adventures will obviously fit my tastes far better...all I'm looking for is the canvas, and what is present in their hodge podge adventure modules just doesn't cut it).

It sounds like I may be bitter about it, but honestly, I've got three and half editions worth of D&D product and one of Pathfinder to mess around with, so it's not like I'm stuck for content to enjoy, adapt and use. ;)
 

Helldritch

Adventurer
And I the same. With about 300 or 400 books of various RPGs (and a good chunk of it is from D&D, all editions mixed in) in additions of a lot of PDF worth several gigs it's not like I really need all the new stuff to get going. I could rely entirely on my own adventures that I have made over the years, adapt the old edition materials and zounds of other ideas.

But sometimes, seeing what the new generation of developers are coming with is worth every cents (ok, dollars...) that I put in. Two heads are better than one. Imagine several heads. (well... save the ettins. In their case one head would have sufficed.)

And no you do not sound bitter. Not even an ounce of it. Being realistic is far from being bitter. And buying something is not an obligation.
 

ZeshinX

Explorer
But sometimes, seeing what the new generation of developers are coming with is worth every cents (ok, dollars...) that I put in. Two heads are better than one. Imagine several heads. (well... save the ettins. In their case one head would have sufficed.)
This is why I buy the splats and monster books. Other than the canvas, I do enjoy seeing what mechanical ideas they come up with (minus the MtG stuff...it's a bit of an irrational hatred seeing them crossed, I'll admit, but it's something I hoped and prayed would never happen from the day WotC gobbled up TSR...also irrationally I suspect it's just a matter of time before combat becomes "Roll for who goes first...and break out your MtG decks...").

I dunno about the several heads...a hydra with migraines is a bad day for any adventurer. ;)
 

Helldritch

Adventurer
I do agree with you. Unfortunately, some features of the adventures and world books are not reprinted in the splat books. A lot the new backgrounds were not. The haunted background we had in CoS was a beauty that many of my players loved and some of them use it even if CoS is long gone behind us. Just the treatment the guilds of Ravnica gave to (well...) guilds could be applied to factions and I used them to adjust what the factions were giving to their members in the FR and they became a feature that the players were now longing to belong to and not just some RP shenanigan that would only give something at the DM whims. The codified version that Ravnica brought was a spring board that made factions quite appealing.

I really think that each book can bring unique things to a DM's campaign. Whatever their experiences and tastes. But sticking to the splat books is not a bad idea either.
 

darjr

I crit!
Huh.

I have to agree somewhat. The Meta-bloat outside of a particular edition or RPG can be very real. Like steam addicts buying lots of games on steam sales but hardly logging hours in proportion.

D&D has to fight against that as well, especially with long term fans and customers.
 

Helldritch

Adventurer
That is why I really love the rate at which the books are being printed. Not too fast, not too slow. It is both good for my wallet and for the quality of the material we get.

Previous editions were getting their books out at an alarming rate and unfortunately, the quality was not always there. In fact, it was often poor to barely acceptable. There were some gems but they were like true gems. Rare. Too rare for my taste. So far, I have yet to see a book in 5ed that I am truly and fully disappointed at. (SCAG was close but it did have some redeeming qualities.)
 

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