D&D 5E 5e isn't a Golden Age of D&D Lorewise, it's Silver at best.

Levistus's_Leviathan

5e Freelancer
the Oath of Conquest Paladin is one of my favorite things
Agreed. That whole subclass is built around the idea of "okay, what if we did a Paladin, but they're lawful evil, like how people played 3.X paladins?"

And they're awesome. Nothing feels better than scaring all of the BBEG's henchmen so much that they're paralyzed by their fear and take psychic damage every round until they die. They're evil, and it's awesome.
 

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Hussar

Legend
Agreed. That whole subclass is built around the idea of "okay, what if we did a Paladin, but they're lawful evil, like how people played 3.X paladins?"

And they're awesome. Nothing feels better than scaring all of the BBEG's henchmen so much that they're paralyzed by their fear and take psychic damage every round until they die. They're evil, and it's awesome.
I based my Oath of Conquest paladin around Lucifer from the TV show. Kept offering deals to NPC's. :D Tons of fun.
 


Zardnaar

Legend
Well, you know, cats. Sneaky little bastards, I didn't see him.

Still a pretty obscure reference, and just an example of skimpy lore. Basically boils down to "Created by a being that almost no one knows, tabaxi are humanoid cats. Except when they aren't."

Yet people don't care, they're just happy to play a purring furry.

Mentioned in 2E and maybe 3E.
 


Maybe to prepare people for if the lore is "messed up" in the D&D movie or Baldur's Gate 3? Because the D&D community is filled with rabid nitpickers that won't stop talking about how Owlbears are Monstrosities and not Beasts so neither Wild Shape nor Polymorph would allow the Druid in the D&D movie to turn into it? Because of how much backlash they got for doing a soft-retcon on the Forgotten Realms with the Spellplague in 4e and wanted to make it clear to D&D pedants that things would be handled differently now than they had in the past? And maybe to try and make the lore less overwhelming for DMs that are just starting to get into D&D and want to research the most popular settings, but are intimidated by the sheer quantity of lore from the nearly 50-year-history of D&D?

It can be a combination of reasons. Primarily to make the "canon" for licensing deals clear to both the companies they're working with and their rabid fanbase but also to make it slightly easier for new DMs. That's my guess.

I've seen folks notice the Owlcat thing, but also be okay with it as it's within reasonable and would only take an extreme minor shift in rules to fix things.
 

5E has an official stance on canon, and it's definitely not "pick and choose." It's "every edition of the roleplaying game has its own canon" and "beyond [the] core rulebooks, we don’t have a public-facing account of what is canonical." 5E canon does not include older-edition canon unless they specifically include it in 5E material, and even then it's only a maybe if it's not in a core rulebook. (This latter point was recently underscored by them moving VGTM and MTOF into a non-canon "Legacy Content" status, replaced by MOTM.)

Now, you can certainly pick and choose anyway - I do - but 5E isn't providing explicit support for this. It's something you just have to do on your own. Same as if you wanted to run a Greyhawk game under 4E rules, or an Eberron game using BECMI.

The funny thing is, tapping into the "vast back catalogue" seemed very much to be the plan for 5E at the beginning, which had references galore to specific older settings in the core rules (mainly in the DMG). They even included novels and video games in the lore. This continued into early adventure modules, with their guidance for adapting them to out-of-print settings. But something changed by 2021, as the new policy discourages that in favor of only 5E's material being canon for 5E.


I assume this is a reference to Klorr? That's more of an Easter egg, a sop to veteran fans, than encouragement to use older material. And even then you'd be expected to use it within Klorr, in the context of them all being "lost and failed domains" slowly sinking into the void. The "real" Ravenloft for 5E is the versions of the domains outside Klorr; the old versions are intended to be out of the picture.

That blog post on canon made no sense and should be ignored as the none sense it was.
 




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