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D&D Movie/TV Bridgerton Star Regé-Jean Page Joins D&D Movie

Regé-Jean Page has joined the cast of the upcoming Dungeons & Dragons movie - which currently has Chris Pine, Michelle Rodriguez, and Justice Smith attached - in a leading role, according to Hollywood Reporter. He played the Duke of Hastings in the period drama which is Netflix's biggest ever show.

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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey

Zardnaar

Legend
Sure, but that was wrong. So now even though it may be historically inaccurate we do let women take those roles.

Yeah but any period piece set during that time frame could do that.

Women actors did exist even then but people thought they were whores. Which was true in some cases apparently.

More of a social more. Here 50 years ago women didn't really go to bars except ladies of the night. Maybe in the big cities but not towns. Rough parts of town maybe idk just going by what my mother said.
 

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TheSword

Legend
Supporter
Yeah but any period piece set during that time frame could do that.

Women actors did exist even then but people thought they were whores. Which was true in some cases apparently.

More of a social more. Here 50 years ago women didn't really go to bars except ladies of the night. Maybe in the big cities but not towns. Rough parts of town maybe idk just going by what my mother said.
If you’re making a point it flew over my head. Women goes into a bar... people assume she’s a prostitute. Sounds a pretty sad state of affairs. Luckily we’ve moved on.

Shakespeare in Love plays around with the issue. A Woman pretending to be a man, pretending to be a woman. It’s both funny and clever, making a play on twelfth night simultaneously as the play on stage.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
If you’re making a point it flew over my head. Women goes into a bar... people assume she’s a prostitute. Sounds a pretty sad state of affairs. Luckily we’ve moved on.

Shakespeare in Love plays around with the issue. A Woman pretending to be a man, pretending to be a woman. It’s both funny and clever, making a play on twelfth night simultaneously as the play on stage.

Yeah that's quite funny. I'm sure it happened as well.

If you want to make the distinction of it being unfair you can do that from a characters pic in the movie/show.

My classics teacher had an interesting way of explaining things in the Roman world.

I think it's more effective if it's just business as usual though as it kind of drives home the point just as hard.
 

My classics teacher had an interesting way of explaining things in the Roman world.

I think it's more effective if it's just business as usual though as it kind of drives home the point just as hard.
The point is, if you made a point about every point in which the past differed from the present, you would never get any storytelling done. Most of them would pass unnoticed by the people who are native to that time zone, and so "making a point of it" would in itself be anachronistic.

Consider Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare. Although set in Ancient Rome, all the characters speak English rather than Latin. Shakespeare even makes an in-joke about it "it's all Greek to me" (educated Romans would have known Greek). There is also a reference to a chiming clock (not invented). And, of course, all the actors would have been white, English and male, rather than diverse and Mediterranean.
 
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Zardnaar

Legend
The point is, if you made a point about every point in which the past differed from the present, you would never get any storytelling done. Most of them would pass unnoticed by the people who are native to that time zone, and so "making a point of it" would in itself be anachronistic.

Consider Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare. Although set in Ancient Rome, all the characters speak English rather than Latin. Shakespeare even makes an in-joke about it "it's all Greek to me" (educated Romans would have known Greek). There is also a reference to a chiming clock (not invented). And, of course, all the actors would have been white, English and male, rather than diverse and Mediterranean.

Makes sense for Rome though. Some of the Emperors were from Armenia and the eastern part of the Empire.

It was very cosmopolitan.
 

CubicsRube

Adventurer
Supporter
Also, are all four humans? Or Drow,half orc, firbolg, tiefling?
That's a good question, and actually related to the original post (can we take the other conversation off thread please?)

What do you think? I wonder if they'd go a "safe" elf, dwarf, human etc.

Might be a more interesting take for them to put the unusual races like you said.

Maybe, tiefling, dragonborn, human, and ?
 

Makes sense for Rome though. Some of the Emperors were from Armenia and the eastern part of the Empire.

It was very cosmopolitan.
Rome was cosmopolitan, Tudor London less so. Shakespeare's cast would have reflected the time and place where it was performed, not the time and place where it was set.
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
It’s not racist on the viewers point to despise this new genre of false period pieces. The show has the trappings of a historic film but is in fact not, which bothers some viewers. The same viewers would enjoy a proper period piece in sub Saharan Africa. But not if actors were inserted from Asia to play African roles. I find this genre of mixing actual history with an alternate whim of history to be intellectually dishonest and insulting to the viewer. Many feel as I do. The distaste has more to do with an intolerance of lies than racial prejudice imo.
I gotta say, fiction doesn't sound like a genre you should be watching. It's full of 'lies'.

As for D&D... yikes! Some of that isn't real either, I hear!
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
And on that note, folks, this forum is not the place for discussion of whether you feel that people of a certain skin colour should be allowed to star in particular types of TV show. There are plenty of places on the web where you can rant about that to your heart's content, but this isn't one of them. Let's talk about the D&D movie, please.
 





Nice casting news, but I'd frankly have a lot more faith in the film if they began referring to it as, say, The Crystal Shard or Dragons of Autumn Twilight or similar. Those are the names of successful, interesting, and popular stories.

"Dungeons & Dragons," on the other hand, is quite the opposite. As a movie, anyway.
Meepo: a Dungeons & Dragons Story

Actually that reminds me of a fantastic Story Hour from long, long ago, in which the characters were making their way through the Sunless Citadel. The Story Hour was written from the perspective of Meepo, who was pulling a Gollum / Smeagol and acting nice while planning on how he would kill the adventurers and feed them to his dragon!
 


ART!

Adventurer
What the hell is a firbolg?
A playable race in D&D 5E.

I always notice hair in period-piece tv series and movies that were made in different decades. Choose any consistently popular literary work, and you can probably find tv/film adaptations from every decade of the last 80-100 years or so, and in every case the hair and costumes will be heavily influenced by the fashions of when that adaptation was made. And what the adaptation chooses to stress from the original work will change based on the norms of the time, the film-makers' interests, etc. I'm reminded of what someone said about the original Star Trek series once: it's not about people in the future, it's about people from the U.S in the 1960s in the future. ;)
 

Also I think I'm in the minority for this one, but I would love it if the movie had a framing device in which all these celebrities, playing themselves, were gathering together for a casual D&D game at one of their houses. Start the movie with them catching up, ordering pizza (I'll give you my Wand of Magic Missile if we can have anchovies on the pizza!), sharing baby pictures... And then the movie ends with them looking forward to next week's game!
 



Mistwell

Legend
Does there need to be a distinction of character classes in the game? Does it need a call-out to class and race and sub-class and feats and ability scores and such to be a good D&D movie?

I mean, if a character throws a fireball and fights with a sword and heals someone with a spell and rages and casts a ritual and turns undead and backstabs someone and changes shape into an animal, will people freak out that it's too many class abilities stuffed into one character for a D&D movie?
 

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